Tag Archives: Yields

SCAD’s Ambitious Multidisciplinary Student Collaboration Yields VR Film

When I was in design school, we ID students had little interaction with the other departments. Few of us ever visited the Architecture department, where the students all reportedly behaved like Colonel Kurtz from Apocalypse Now. But it might’ve been nice to have some creative crossover.

SCAD is a design school that does foster creative crossovers, creating multidisciplinary projects that harness the school’s various departments to create things greater than the sum of their parts. A recent course at their Collaborative Learning Center, for instance, involved students from multiple programs: Animation, Costume Design, Dramatic Writing, Film & Television, Motion Media Design, Sound Design, Themed Entertainment Design, Production Design, and Visual Effects, all collaborating on a single massive project.

That project was “Say it with Music,” a virtual reality film that debuted at this year’s Savannah Film Festival. Take a look behind the scenes and see what these students cooked up:

I like how they shot it all in one take, like Scorcese dong the club entry scene from GoodFellas. The project looks like it was a lot of fun—even if, it appears, there weren’t any ID students involved. Speaking of which, current ID students at SCAD or elsewhere: 

Does your school have collaborative interdepartmental projects? And if not, do you have any ideas for what those could be, and what departments they’d involve?


Core77

SCAD’s Ambitious Multidisciplinary Student Collaboration Yields VR Film

When I was in design school, we ID students had little interaction with the other departments. Few of us ever visited the Architecture department, where the students all reportedly behaved like Colonel Kurtz from Apocalypse Now. But it might’ve been nice to have some creative crossover.

SCAD is a design school that does foster creative crossovers, creating multidisciplinary projects that harness the school’s various departments to create things greater than the sum of their parts. A recent course at their Collaborative Learning Center, for instance, involved students from multiple programs: Animation, Costume Design, Dramatic Writing, Film & Television, Motion Media Design, Sound Design, Themed Entertainment Design, Production Design, and Visual Effects, all collaborating on a single massive project.

That project was “Say it with Music,” a virtual reality film that debuted at this year’s Savannah Film Festival. Take a look behind the scenes and see what these students cooked up:

I like how they shot it all in one take, like Scorcese dong the club entry scene from GoodFellas. The project looks like it was a lot of fun—even if, it appears, there weren’t any ID students involved. Speaking of which, current ID students at SCAD or elsewhere: 

Does your school have collaborative interdepartmental projects? And if not, do you have any ideas for what those could be, and what departments they’d involve?


Core77

Combining Holograms with Visual Presentation Technique from 1892 Yields Stunning Film Trick

In the late 19th Century, French inventor Charles-Émile Reynaud developed a way to project primitive moving images onto a painted background scene. He called his invention the Théâtre Optique (Optical Theater) and began wowing Parisian crowds with it in 1892.

Here in 2016, film director and visual artist Jeff Desom is taking a page out of Reynaud’s book—and going 3D with it. Desom has modelmaker Oli Pesch create miniature sets, into which Desom projects carefully-rotoscoped holograms to create these:

HOLORAMA: An Optical Theatre from Jeff Desom on Vimeo.

Desom calls the resultant presentation The Holorama.

For those interested in the influence Desom cites, here’s a video of Walt Disney himself explaining and demonstrating Reynaud’s invention:


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Better Design Yields a Smarter Scanner

This is one of my most prized possessions, a first-print edition of Burton Stevenson’s The Home Book of Proverbs, Maxims and Familiar Phrases from 1948.

(Please ignore the dogs, they like the smell of old books and I couldn’t shoo them out of the photo.)

The book is filled with nothing but short snippets, making it the perfect thing to flip through while you’re waiting in line, on the subway or at the airport. But at nearly 3,000 pages it’s too unwieldy to carry around and certainly too delicate to throw into a backpack.

Several years ago I looked into having the book digitized and put into my smartphone, but none of the book-scanning options I could find were good. One service told me they could only do it by destroying the book in the process, ripping the pages out of the spine to scan it flat; another service featured an absurdly huge machine with two glass platens to keep the pages flat, two overhead cameras set at angles and a special lighting set-up—and the price they quoted me was attendantly horrific.

Now it’s just a few years later and those big machines are about to become obsolete. The pages of scanned books needn’t be held flat any longer, as software can correct for irregular geometry, OCR software is getting better and tiny, cheap, powerful cameras are becoming ubiquitous. It’s just a matter of time before something like the Czur, billed as “The world’s first true smart scanner,” becomes the standard. Look at how it works, how easy the UI is and how it can be used for more than just books:

I do wish the video demonstration didn’t feature a short story (Faulkner’s “That Evening Sun”) that prominently features the N-word twice on the same page. But developer Kang Zhou hails from Shenzhen, so English not being his first language, I guess we’ve gotta give the guy a pass.

(By the bye, sharp-eyed readers: If you freeze-frame on the story snippet, there’s a telltale sign that they’re actually scanning a pirated version of the short story. Can you spot the giveaway?)

The Czur is currently taking pre-orders on Indiegogo (it’s already been nearly 800% funded) for $ 199, and that price includes a foot pedal not shown in the video. It’s expected to retail for $ 399 and will ship in January. I’m tempted to order one so I can finally scan the Stevenson tome, but I know that the second I do, someone will finally release a digital version of it.


Core77