Tag Archives: world

Russian Dental Clinic N2 – Probably The Scariest Dental Clinic In The World

Do you have any scary dentist memories from your childhood? Believe Julia Kalinina, you’re all good, after seeing this you will understand you had nothing to fear of. Recently a batch of photos of the Dental Clinic N2 in Moscow, Russia was released by Julia Kalinina and it went viral.

More info: Facebook (h/t: slavforum)

It is actually a fully functioning (public) dental clinic, but from the outside you might get an impression it is a abandoned homeless shelter. Julia said equipment inside is not any better, it is probably older than she is.

There are only two drugs used in the clinic: dental cement and Lidocaine. Clinic is in ruined conditions, which she witnessed as the cement was falling out of the walls, but the regional health care can’t afford to repair right now.

Your dentist childhood fears on a whole new level!



Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Dickens World, The Defunct Theme Park Dedicated To Live Action Re-Enactments Of Charles Dickens Novels

They theme park had life-sized replicas of the streets where Oliver Twist and Company picked pockets, poorhouses and the ghost chamber where you get haunted by the ghosts of the Marley Brothers from the classic A Christmas Carol. The website is still live even though it closed in 2016.

More info: Dickens World (h/t: messynessychic)










Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Stunning Photos Of American Women At Work During World War II


Woman working on an airplane motor at North American Aviation Inc, plant in California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


This girl in a glass house is putting finishing touches on the bombardier nose section of a B-17F Flying Fortress navy bomber, Long Beach, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)>


Portrait of Assembly and Repairs Department senior supervisor Eloise J. Ellis as she stands near the tail of a Navy plane at Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi, Texas, August 1942. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Getty Images)


Virginia Davis, a riveter in the assembly and repair department of the Naval air base, supervises Chas. Potter, a NYA trainee from Michigan, Corpus Christi, Texas, 1942. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


Women at work on bomber, Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


The careful hands of women are trained in precise aircraft engine installation duties at Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


Drilling on a Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp, Fort Worth, Texas, 1942. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


An A-20 bomber being riveted by a woman worker at the Douglas Aircraft Company plant at Long Beach, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


Girl worker at lunch also absorbing California sunshine, Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


An unidentified lathe operator machines parts for transport planes at the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation plant, Fort Worth, Texas, October 1942. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Getty Images)


Drilling a wing bulkhead for a transport plane at the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation plant, Fort Worth, Texas, 1942. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


A young woman employee of North American Aviation Incorporated, working over the landing gear mechanism of a P-51 fighter plane, Inglewood, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


Heil and Co. employee Lucile Mazurek works on black-out lamps to be used on Air Force gasoline trailers, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, February 1943. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Getty Images)


Operating a hand drill at Vultee-Nashville, woman is working on a Vengeance dive bomber, Tennessee, 1943. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


One of the girls of Vilter Manufacturing Co. filing small gun parts, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1943. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


A gist inspector for the Chain Belt Co. looks over one of the 25 cutters for burrs before inserting it in the inside of a 105mm howitzer at the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1943. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Stunning Photos Of American Women At Work During World War II


Woman working on an airplane motor at North American Aviation Inc, plant in California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


This girl in a glass house is putting finishing touches on the bombardier nose section of a B-17F Flying Fortress navy bomber, Long Beach, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)>


Portrait of Assembly and Repairs Department senior supervisor Eloise J. Ellis as she stands near the tail of a Navy plane at Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi, Texas, August 1942. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Getty Images)


Virginia Davis, a riveter in the assembly and repair department of the Naval air base, supervises Chas. Potter, a NYA trainee from Michigan, Corpus Christi, Texas, 1942. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


Women at work on bomber, Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


The careful hands of women are trained in precise aircraft engine installation duties at Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


Drilling on a Liberator Bomber, Consolidated Aircraft Corp, Fort Worth, Texas, 1942. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


An A-20 bomber being riveted by a woman worker at the Douglas Aircraft Company plant at Long Beach, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


Girl worker at lunch also absorbing California sunshine, Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


An unidentified lathe operator machines parts for transport planes at the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation plant, Fort Worth, Texas, October 1942. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Getty Images)


Drilling a wing bulkhead for a transport plane at the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation plant, Fort Worth, Texas, 1942. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


A young woman employee of North American Aviation Incorporated, working over the landing gear mechanism of a P-51 fighter plane, Inglewood, California, 1942. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


Heil and Co. employee Lucile Mazurek works on black-out lamps to be used on Air Force gasoline trailers, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, February 1943. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Getty Images)


Operating a hand drill at Vultee-Nashville, woman is working on a Vengeance dive bomber, Tennessee, 1943. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


One of the girls of Vilter Manufacturing Co. filing small gun parts, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1943. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


A gist inspector for the Chain Belt Co. looks over one of the 25 cutters for burrs before inserting it in the inside of a 105mm howitzer at the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1943. (Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Buyenlarge/Getty Images)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

A Vibram Materials Competition, A Theme Park for Designers and The World of Charles and Ray Eames

Jumpstart your week with our insider’s guide to events in the design world. From must-see exhibitions to insightful lectures and the competitions you need to know about—here’s the best of what’s going on, right now.

Monday

Call for Entries: Vibram Rubber Skin Attitude

Vibram is relying on the international design community to explore new applications, products and shapes for their exclusive Luxury Rubber material, on the occasion of the 80th anniversary of the renowned Carrarmato design. The winner will take home a hefty cash prize and have the opportunity to attend a workshop in the Vibram Technological Center in China.

Online competition open through May 16, 2017.

Tuesday

IDeal: Hacking Healthy Soil

The City of Chicago doesn’t have a public facility to treat and manage organic waste, therefore, any organic material that isn’t used is transferred to landfills. Hacking Healthy Soil participants will join teams to design tangible solutions to this issue. Each team will use design methodologies to tackle a specific task with the goal of creating meaningful outcomes based on sustainable principles.

Chicago, IL. March 7, 2017 at 8:30 AM.

Wednesday

Design Shanghai

Design Shanghai is the leading design event in Asia, and it has set a precedent in China’s ever-growing design community. The festival provides a unique and exciting platform to network and establish long-term business relations with Asia’s top architects, interior designers, property developers, retailers and private buyers.

Shanghai, China. March 8 through 11, 2017.

Thursday

IXDS Amusement Park of Connectedness

During Munich Creative Business Week, join IXDS for a party to remember at their Munich studio. Marvel at the good, the bad, and the ugly of our connected world, as IXDX transforms their studio into an interactive theme park. Enjoy interactive carnival games with a twist and enlightening talks from design leaders.

Munich, Germany. March 9, 2017 at 5:30 PM.

Friday

The World of Charles and Ray Eames

From personal letters, photographs, drawings and artwork, to their products, models, multi-media installations and furniture, The World of Charles and Ray Eames includes not only the designs for which the design couple is best known, but provides insight into the lives of the Eameses, the Eames Office and the breadth of their pioneering work. 

Genk, Belgium. On view through May 28, 2017.

Saturday/Sunday

Image via The Next Web.

UX Design Course for Startups, Developers and Designers

A short, practical and affordable weekend course on user experience design lead by professional designers that covers an entire design process: from how to do user research, information architecture and experience maps to user testing, accessibility practices and working with developers.

London, UK. March 11, 2017 at 2:00 PM.

Check out the Core77 Calendar for more design world events, competitions and exhibitions, or submit your own to be considered for our next Week in Design.


Core77

Sony World Photography Awards 2017 Shortlist


Nature category, open shortlist. “Diamond-dust”. A picture taken in Nagano-ken, Japan, at an altitude of about 1,700 metres. Diamond dust can be seen on only a few occasions during the cold season. (Photo and caption by Masayasu Sakuma/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Daily life category, professional shortlist. “Inhabitants of the empty”. Syuzanna sits in a shelter made from an old car in front of the abandoned building where she lives in Gyumri, Armenia. (Photo and caption by Yulia Grigoryants/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Daily life category, professional shortlist. “A country doctor and her calling”. Family doctor Floarea Ciupitu visits a house in the village of Gângiova in south-west Romania, where she has worked for the past three decades. (Photo and caption by Ioana Moldovan/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Culture category, open shortlist. “Georgian baptism”. An infant is baptised according to the Orthodox rite in a church in Tbilisi, Georgia. (Photo and caption by Beniamino Pisati/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Culture category, open shortlist. “Mourning ceremony”, pictured in Iran. (Photo and caption by Emrah Karakoç/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Wildlife category, open shortlist. “Buffaloes and stars”. This picture, taken at Zimanga game reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, used an in-camera multiple exposure, with the first lit for the buffaloes and the second focused on the stars. (Photo and caption by Andreas Hemb/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, professional shortlist. “Hamza & Shukra”, from the series Racism in India: the African Portraits. (Photo and caption by Mahesh Shantaram/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, open shortlist. “Present and past” shows 85-year-old Carmen Sajeras, born in Cuba from a family of Spanish immigrants. (Photo and caption by Anisleidy Martínez Fonseca/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, professional shortlist. “Raul Rodrigues Jr” in Apple Valley, California, US. Photographers Edoardo Delille and Giulia Piermartiri went on the road to meet Latinos pledging their vote to Donald Trump. (Photo and caption by Giulia Piermartiri & Edoardo Delille/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Current affairs and news category, professional shortlist. “Caught in the crossfire”. Iraqi men from the Hawija region wait to be questioned by Kurdish security personnel at a base near Kirkuk, Iraq. (Photo and caption by Ivor Prickett/2017 Sony World Photography Awards/Panos Pictures)


Current affairs and news category, professional shortlist. “We are taking no prisoners”. Libyan forces affiliated to the Tripoli government walk around a huge chandelier at the Ouagadougou congress complex in Sirte, Libya. (Photo and caption by Alessio Romenzi/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Sport category, professional shortlist. “Pumping iron in Russia”. Participants wait backstage during a regional bodybuilding championship in Stavropol, southern Russia. (Photo and caption by Eduard Korniyenko/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Travel category, open shortlist. “Lady in red”, shot with a drone on the eastern part of the Luštica peninsula in Montenegro. (Photo and caption by Placido Faranda/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Street photography category, open shortlist. “Metropolis”. A reflection in a window interrupts a street scene. (Photo and caption by Tavepong Pratoomwong/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Still life category, open shortlist. “Palm trees routine” was shot during a visit to the Muralla Roja residential complex in Alicante, Spain. (Photo and caption by Andrés Gallardo Albajar/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Sony World Photography Awards 2017 Shortlist


Nature category, open shortlist. “Diamond-dust”. A picture taken in Nagano-ken, Japan, at an altitude of about 1,700 metres. Diamond dust can be seen on only a few occasions during the cold season. (Photo and caption by Masayasu Sakuma/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Daily life category, professional shortlist. “Inhabitants of the empty”. Syuzanna sits in a shelter made from an old car in front of the abandoned building where she lives in Gyumri, Armenia. (Photo and caption by Yulia Grigoryants/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Daily life category, professional shortlist. “A country doctor and her calling”. Family doctor Floarea Ciupitu visits a house in the village of Gângiova in south-west Romania, where she has worked for the past three decades. (Photo and caption by Ioana Moldovan/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Culture category, open shortlist. “Georgian baptism”. An infant is baptised according to the Orthodox rite in a church in Tbilisi, Georgia. (Photo and caption by Beniamino Pisati/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Culture category, open shortlist. “Mourning ceremony”, pictured in Iran. (Photo and caption by Emrah Karakoç/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Wildlife category, open shortlist. “Buffaloes and stars”. This picture, taken at Zimanga game reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, used an in-camera multiple exposure, with the first lit for the buffaloes and the second focused on the stars. (Photo and caption by Andreas Hemb/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, professional shortlist. “Hamza & Shukra”, from the series Racism in India: the African Portraits. (Photo and caption by Mahesh Shantaram/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, open shortlist. “Present and past” shows 85-year-old Carmen Sajeras, born in Cuba from a family of Spanish immigrants. (Photo and caption by Anisleidy Martínez Fonseca/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, professional shortlist. “Raul Rodrigues Jr” in Apple Valley, California, US. Photographers Edoardo Delille and Giulia Piermartiri went on the road to meet Latinos pledging their vote to Donald Trump. (Photo and caption by Giulia Piermartiri & Edoardo Delille/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Current affairs and news category, professional shortlist. “Caught in the crossfire”. Iraqi men from the Hawija region wait to be questioned by Kurdish security personnel at a base near Kirkuk, Iraq. (Photo and caption by Ivor Prickett/2017 Sony World Photography Awards/Panos Pictures)


Current affairs and news category, professional shortlist. “We are taking no prisoners”. Libyan forces affiliated to the Tripoli government walk around a huge chandelier at the Ouagadougou congress complex in Sirte, Libya. (Photo and caption by Alessio Romenzi/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Sport category, professional shortlist. “Pumping iron in Russia”. Participants wait backstage during a regional bodybuilding championship in Stavropol, southern Russia. (Photo and caption by Eduard Korniyenko/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Travel category, open shortlist. “Lady in red”, shot with a drone on the eastern part of the Luštica peninsula in Montenegro. (Photo and caption by Placido Faranda/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Street photography category, open shortlist. “Metropolis”. A reflection in a window interrupts a street scene. (Photo and caption by Tavepong Pratoomwong/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Still life category, open shortlist. “Palm trees routine” was shot during a visit to the Muralla Roja residential complex in Alicante, Spain. (Photo and caption by Andrés Gallardo Albajar/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Can Photographs Change The World? Somalia Tragedy Through The Lens Of Jean-Claude Coutausse

Photographs have the capacity to transcend politics, in the times of war, natural disasters and perpetrated crimes. The written and verbal perspectives of media figures and scholars can at times diminish the causalties of victims. One of the below photographs by Jean-Claude Coutausse displays Somali men running the opposite way a United Nations convoy is driving towards and the other photograph depicts a Somali boy protesting “against the presence of foreign troops” with two bloody corpses and a crowd dissembling behind him. As a native of Somalia and as an American, these two photographs represent volumes of irony in politics where causalities can not be ignored. Thus as Jonathan Klein has stated “images have the impact of touching people.”

North Kenya, Liboi. A young Somali refugee crosses a field filled with marabous storks in July 1992:

Although the above photos have changed the world, Operation Restore Hope has traces of obscurity from our U.S. nation’s standpoint as well as my native Somalia. Censorship is a great contributor to this obscurity as Ted Rall put it “Dead and wounded Afghans, Iraqis, Pakistanis, Somalis, Yemenis and Libyans have been expunged from American popular culture as well. Other factors are the 6 corporations which control 90% of the media in America” which “constrict the flow of information”
as Professor Nordell stated.

More info: Jean-Claude Coutausse

North Kenya, Liboi. Somali refugee camp in July 1992:

Operation Restore Hope began as a mission by the United States to assist Somalia in the Civil War, which was a war between two previously allied tribes that were responsible for overthrowing the Somali President, Said Baare. However is it is necessary to revisit the history of the United States in relation to war to fully understand Operation Restore Hope.

North Kenya, Liboi. Somali refugee camp in July 1992:

The United States of America is one of the most powerful countries in the world mainly for its role in wars since 1776 until 2011 and thereafter in “unannounced wars”, drone strikes. As a result its involvement in wars, the United States’ abundance of resources (food, clean water, shelter, hospitals, etc.) and security (border protection of land, marine, air and cyber security) exceeds that of any other developed nation around the globe. When the United Nations pleaded for humanitarian assistance in Somalia from allied countries, the United States volunteered. Finally Somalia had a beacon of hope to help bring an end to the Civil War.

North Kenya, Liboi. Somali refugee camp in July 1992:

The heroic attempts of the United States’ to restore peace in Somalia would ultimately end as a failed mission. Hence, the above photographs changed the world by transcending politics and “showing man’s destructive power over man” as Jonathan Klein stated.

North Kenya, Liboi. Somali refugee in July 1992:

North Kenya, Liboi. Kitchen in Somali refugee camp in Hagadera in July 1992:

Somalia. Ruins of the Mogadishu port in July 1992:

North Kenya, Liboi. Feeding center in Somali refugee camp in Dagahaley in July 1992:

North Kenya, Liboi. Hospital in Somali refugee camp in July 1992:

Somalia, Kurtun Warey. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Kurtun Warey. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Kurtun Warey. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Bur Akaba. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Kurtun Warey. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Kurtun Warey. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Mogadishu. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Kurtun Warey. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Baidoa. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Baidoa. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Baidoa. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Baidoa. Feeding center for the persons displaced by the civil war in July 1992:

Somalia, Mogadishu. Somalians and Pakistani soldiers under UN mandate in July 1993:

Somalia, Mogadishu. Pakistani soldiers under UN mandate open fire on protestors against the presence of foreign troops in July 1993:

Somalia, Mogadishu. Pakistani soldiers under UN mandate in July 1993:

Somalia, Mogadishu. July 1993:


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

The Most Diabolically Evil-Looking Buildings In The World

Sometimes you have to wonder if architects secretly want to take over the world. Maybe it’s the planes of black-tinted glass, the jutting angles, or the sweeping archways that differentiate a “headquarters” and a “compound” but sometimes you look at a building and it just plain gives you the WILLIES. Over on reddit’s r/evilbuildings they are dedicated to archiving and collecting each and every nefarious shelter mankind was twisted enough to erect, this is but a mere sampling of their findings.

More info: Reddit (h/t: dorkly)

France’s Polygone Riviera
Big frère is watching you.

MahaNakhon Tower in Bangkok
The corruption is spreading.

Art Nouveau House in Brussels, Belgium
Parties here are BYOB: Bring Your Own Blood.

The University of Toronto’s Robarts Library
Didn’t the Power Rangers pilot one of these in 2002?

The Tommorow Square Building in Shanghai
You may fire the laser when ready, Overlord Gorlox!

Saint Petersburg’s infamous “Fort Plauge” in Russia
This was actually a government germ warfare facility, that’s spooky.

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia’s Kingdom Centre
The eye of Sauron got a makeover for the digital age.

This Swedish ISP’s office in a granite atomic bomb shelter
Now THAT’S what protecting your data looks like.

The Max Planck Research Institute for Experimental Medicine in Berlin, Germany
When you’re a medical facility but you have to engage in navel warfare at 7.

Philadelphia City Hall
You know Ben Franklin’s ghost is throwing crazy parties in there.

Italian Fire Station, or Hydra Headquarters?
Style, Sex, Safety.

The Temple Expiatori del Sagrat Cor in Barcelona
Pictured: Jesus of Nazareth telling a bunch of Demons to chill the fuck out.

Reiyukai Shakaden Temple, Tokyo
Who knew that the Galactic Empire was into new-age Bhuddism?

Al Tijaria Tower in Kuwait City
This will come in handy when we have to sacrifice a giant virgin to a volcano.

Velasca Tower, Venice
The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror, but real.


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Astonishing And Unusual Homes From Around The World

6
A suspected illegal construction is seen covered by green plants atop a 19-storey residential building in Guangzhou, Guangdong province April 11, 2014. (Photo by Reuters/China Daily)

1
An airplane house is pictured in the village of Miziara, northern Lebanon May 12, 2015. Miziara prides itself on building residential homes that resemble ancient Greek temples and Egyptian ruins, one is even built in the shape of an Airbus A380. (Photo by Aziz Taher/Reuters)

2
A view shows an airplane house in the village of Miziara, northern Lebanon May 12, 2015. (Photo by Aziz Taher/Reuters)

3
A model of a shark is seen in the roof of a house in Oxford, Britain October 26, 2013. The rooftop sculpture is 25 feet (7.6 m) long, made of fiberglass and was erected on the 41st anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Nagasaki. (Photo by Eddie Keogh/Reuters)

4
A statue is pictured in front of a pyramid house in the village of Miziara, northern Lebanon May 12, 2015. (Photo by Aziz Taher/Reuters)

5
A house under construction which is in the shape of an ancient Greek temple like the one in Baalbek, eastern Lebanon, is pictured in the village of Miziara, northern Lebanon May 12, 2015. (Photo by Aziz Taher/Reuters)

7
A house built on a rock is seen on the river Drina near Bajina Basta, Serbia May 22, 2013. The house was built in 1968 by a group of young men who decided that the rock on the river was an ideal place for a tiny shelter, according to the house’s co-owner, who was among those involved in its construction. (Photo by Marko Djurica/Reuters)

8
Houses are seen on the rooftop of a factory building in Dongguan, Guangdong province, China September 10, 2013. (Photo by Reuters/China Daily)

9
A Tumbleweed brand Cypress 24 model Tiny House is towed down the highway near Boulder, Colorado August 4, 2014. The Tiny House Movement started some years ago with people around the world building really small living spaces and loving their new simplified lives. These tiny houses can range from 1,000 square feet (93 square meters) down to less than 100 square feet (9.3 square meters), and are certainly not ramshackle shacks. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)

10
Liu Lingchao, 38, carries his makeshift dwelling as he walks along a road in Shapu township of Liuzhou, Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region, China May 21, 2013. Five years ago, Liu decided to walk back to his hometown Rongan county in Guangxi from Shenzhen, where he once worked as a migrant worker. With bamboo, plastic bags and bed sheets, Liu made himself a 1.5-metre-wide, 2-metre-high, “portable room” weighing about 60 kg (132 lb), to carry with him as he walks an average of 20 kilometers everyday. To support himself, Liu collects garbage all the way during the journey and he is now 20 miles away from his hometown, according to local media. (Photo by Reuters/Stringer)

11
The Heliodome, a bioclimatic solar house is seen in Cosswiller near Strasbourg, eastern France, August 4, 2011. The house is designed as a giant three-dimensional sundial, set on a fixed angle in relationship to the sun’s movements to provide shade during the summer months, keeping the inside temperature cool. During fall, winter and spring, sunlight enters the large windows as the sun’s position is lower in the sky, thus warming the living space. (Photo by Vincent Kessler/Reuters)

12
Girls play on a trampoline near a home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The “Rock” as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. (Photo by Jim Urquhart/Reuters)

13
A Bulgarian woman looks inside her wine vat home in Socuellamos, central Spain, October 2, 2007. About 40 people living in this makeshift camp are ethnic Turks from Bulgaria who came to the vineyards of Socuellamos to pick grapes during the six-week annual harvest. At night they sleep in 20 or so overturned wine vats – car-sized concrete barrels dumped on the outskirts of Socuellamos, a farming community in the hot and dusty region of Castilla-La Mancha. (Photo by Andrea Comas/Reuters)

14
Bohumil Lhota, a 73-year-old builder, turns the house he built in Velke Hamry, Czech Republic August 7, 2012. Lhota conceptualized the idea to create the unique house and started to build it in 1981, building it close to nature to benefit from the cooler ground temperature. Lhota’s house, which is built in 2002, is able to move up and down and rotate on its sides, which allows him to adjust to his preferred window view. (Photo by Petr Josek/Reuters)

15
Benito Hernandez stands outside his home near San Jose de Las Piedras in Mexico’s northern state of Coahuila January 16, 2013. For over 30 years, Hernandez, his wife Santa Martha de la Cruz Villarreal and their family have lived in an odd sun-dried brick home with a huge 40 meter (131 feet) diameter rock used as a roof. (Photo by Daniel Becerril/Reuters)

16
Hong Kong architect Gary Chang rests in a hammock inside his 32-square-metre apartment in Hong Kong January 28, 2010. After three decades in the same boxy dwelling Chang grew up in, he came up with an innovative answer to the increasingly cramped lives of many urban dwellers – the science fiction-like “domestic transformer”. (Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters)

17
A man takes a picture of the one of the world’s narrowest buildings, built as an artistic installation, wedged between two existing buildings, in Warsaw, Poland October 23, 2012. The building, just 92 cm (36 inches) wide at its narrowest point, will be a part-time home to Israeli writer Edgar Keret. Keret, who told media he would live there when he visits Warsaw twice a year, said he conceived the project as a kind of memorial to his parents’ family who died in the World War II Holocaust. (Photo by Kacper Pempel/Reuters)

18
A view of about 70 domes houses, which were built by U.S.-based Domes for the World, for villagers who lost their houses due to an earthquake in Sumberharjo village, near Yogyakarta, Indonesia May 8, 2007. (Photo by Dwi Oblo/Reuters)

19
Brazilian artists Tiago Primo (top) and his brother Gabriel hang out at a wall in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil July 8, 2009. The bizarre vertical “house” was built on a climbing wall. (Photo by Bruno Domingos/Reuters)

20
Workers demolish a privately-built villa, surrounded by imitation rocks, on the rooftop of a 26-storey residential building in Beijing, China August 26, 2013. (Photo by Reuters/Stringer)

21
Potential buyers stand with an agent on the balcony of a three-bedroom home made from four old shipping containers in Sydney August 1, 2005. The two-storey mobile home includes two bathrooms, timber floors, air conditioning, a kitchen, laundry, balcony and sewage treatment tank, which can be pulled apart in less than a day for ease of transportation. (Photo by David Gray/Reuters)

22
A general view of a treehouse in Le Pian Medoc, southwestern France, April 24, 2009. (Photo by Regis Duvignau/Reuters)

23
Thierry Atta sweeps the courtyard of his house built in the shape of a crocodile in Abidjan, Ivory Coast September 11, 2008. (Photo by Thierry Gouegnon/Reuters)

24
A house partially built in the shape of an airplane is seen in Abuja, Nigeria November 24, 2009. (Photo by Goran Tomasevic/Reuters)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Astonishing And Unusual Homes From Around The World

6
A suspected illegal construction is seen covered by green plants atop a 19-storey residential building in Guangzhou, Guangdong province April 11, 2014. (Photo by Reuters/China Daily)

1
An airplane house is pictured in the village of Miziara, northern Lebanon May 12, 2015. Miziara prides itself on building residential homes that resemble ancient Greek temples and Egyptian ruins, one is even built in the shape of an Airbus A380. (Photo by Aziz Taher/Reuters)

2
A view shows an airplane house in the village of Miziara, northern Lebanon May 12, 2015. (Photo by Aziz Taher/Reuters)

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A model of a shark is seen in the roof of a house in Oxford, Britain October 26, 2013. The rooftop sculpture is 25 feet (7.6 m) long, made of fiberglass and was erected on the 41st anniversary of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Nagasaki. (Photo by Eddie Keogh/Reuters)

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A statue is pictured in front of a pyramid house in the village of Miziara, northern Lebanon May 12, 2015. (Photo by Aziz Taher/Reuters)

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A house under construction which is in the shape of an ancient Greek temple like the one in Baalbek, eastern Lebanon, is pictured in the village of Miziara, northern Lebanon May 12, 2015. (Photo by Aziz Taher/Reuters)

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A house built on a rock is seen on the river Drina near Bajina Basta, Serbia May 22, 2013. The house was built in 1968 by a group of young men who decided that the rock on the river was an ideal place for a tiny shelter, according to the house’s co-owner, who was among those involved in its construction. (Photo by Marko Djurica/Reuters)

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Houses are seen on the rooftop of a factory building in Dongguan, Guangdong province, China September 10, 2013. (Photo by Reuters/China Daily)

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A Tumbleweed brand Cypress 24 model Tiny House is towed down the highway near Boulder, Colorado August 4, 2014. The Tiny House Movement started some years ago with people around the world building really small living spaces and loving their new simplified lives. These tiny houses can range from 1,000 square feet (93 square meters) down to less than 100 square feet (9.3 square meters), and are certainly not ramshackle shacks. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)

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Liu Lingchao, 38, carries his makeshift dwelling as he walks along a road in Shapu township of Liuzhou, Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region, China May 21, 2013. Five years ago, Liu decided to walk back to his hometown Rongan county in Guangxi from Shenzhen, where he once worked as a migrant worker. With bamboo, plastic bags and bed sheets, Liu made himself a 1.5-metre-wide, 2-metre-high, “portable room” weighing about 60 kg (132 lb), to carry with him as he walks an average of 20 kilometers everyday. To support himself, Liu collects garbage all the way during the journey and he is now 20 miles away from his hometown, according to local media. (Photo by Reuters/Stringer)

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The Heliodome, a bioclimatic solar house is seen in Cosswiller near Strasbourg, eastern France, August 4, 2011. The house is designed as a giant three-dimensional sundial, set on a fixed angle in relationship to the sun’s movements to provide shade during the summer months, keeping the inside temperature cool. During fall, winter and spring, sunlight enters the large windows as the sun’s position is lower in the sky, thus warming the living space. (Photo by Vincent Kessler/Reuters)

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Girls play on a trampoline near a home blasted from a rock wall at the Rockland Ranch community outside Moab, Utah, November 2, 2012. The “Rock” as it is referred to by the approximately 100 people living there in about 15 families, was founded about 35 years ago on a sandstone formation near Canyonlands National Park. (Photo by Jim Urquhart/Reuters)

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A Bulgarian woman looks inside her wine vat home in Socuellamos, central Spain, October 2, 2007. About 40 people living in this makeshift camp are ethnic Turks from Bulgaria who came to the vineyards of Socuellamos to pick grapes during the six-week annual harvest. At night they sleep in 20 or so overturned wine vats – car-sized concrete barrels dumped on the outskirts of Socuellamos, a farming community in the hot and dusty region of Castilla-La Mancha. (Photo by Andrea Comas/Reuters)

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Bohumil Lhota, a 73-year-old builder, turns the house he built in Velke Hamry, Czech Republic August 7, 2012. Lhota conceptualized the idea to create the unique house and started to build it in 1981, building it close to nature to benefit from the cooler ground temperature. Lhota’s house, which is built in 2002, is able to move up and down and rotate on its sides, which allows him to adjust to his preferred window view. (Photo by Petr Josek/Reuters)

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Benito Hernandez stands outside his home near San Jose de Las Piedras in Mexico’s northern state of Coahuila January 16, 2013. For over 30 years, Hernandez, his wife Santa Martha de la Cruz Villarreal and their family have lived in an odd sun-dried brick home with a huge 40 meter (131 feet) diameter rock used as a roof. (Photo by Daniel Becerril/Reuters)

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Hong Kong architect Gary Chang rests in a hammock inside his 32-square-metre apartment in Hong Kong January 28, 2010. After three decades in the same boxy dwelling Chang grew up in, he came up with an innovative answer to the increasingly cramped lives of many urban dwellers – the science fiction-like “domestic transformer”. (Photo by Bobby Yip/Reuters)

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A man takes a picture of the one of the world’s narrowest buildings, built as an artistic installation, wedged between two existing buildings, in Warsaw, Poland October 23, 2012. The building, just 92 cm (36 inches) wide at its narrowest point, will be a part-time home to Israeli writer Edgar Keret. Keret, who told media he would live there when he visits Warsaw twice a year, said he conceived the project as a kind of memorial to his parents’ family who died in the World War II Holocaust. (Photo by Kacper Pempel/Reuters)

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A view of about 70 domes houses, which were built by U.S.-based Domes for the World, for villagers who lost their houses due to an earthquake in Sumberharjo village, near Yogyakarta, Indonesia May 8, 2007. (Photo by Dwi Oblo/Reuters)

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Brazilian artists Tiago Primo (top) and his brother Gabriel hang out at a wall in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil July 8, 2009. The bizarre vertical “house” was built on a climbing wall. (Photo by Bruno Domingos/Reuters)

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Workers demolish a privately-built villa, surrounded by imitation rocks, on the rooftop of a 26-storey residential building in Beijing, China August 26, 2013. (Photo by Reuters/Stringer)

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Potential buyers stand with an agent on the balcony of a three-bedroom home made from four old shipping containers in Sydney August 1, 2005. The two-storey mobile home includes two bathrooms, timber floors, air conditioning, a kitchen, laundry, balcony and sewage treatment tank, which can be pulled apart in less than a day for ease of transportation. (Photo by David Gray/Reuters)

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A general view of a treehouse in Le Pian Medoc, southwestern France, April 24, 2009. (Photo by Regis Duvignau/Reuters)

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Thierry Atta sweeps the courtyard of his house built in the shape of a crocodile in Abidjan, Ivory Coast September 11, 2008. (Photo by Thierry Gouegnon/Reuters)

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A house partially built in the shape of an airplane is seen in Abuja, Nigeria November 24, 2009. (Photo by Goran Tomasevic/Reuters)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

“Vote With Your Feet:” A Way to Announce Your Views to the World

Is there one belief you hold, one mannerism you were raised with, that 99% of people don’t seem to share? For me it is the old Emily Post notion, instilled in me during childhood, that it is impolite to discuss politics or religion outside of your home. As someone who has friends on both sides of the political fence, out in public my instinct is to steer conversation towards what we have in common, keeping well clear of the edge of the road.

These days, it seems that all people talk about is politics and religion. Many are eager to trumpet their opinions on various topics. A tongue-in-cheek art installation called “Vote With Your Feet” capitalizes on this urge:

“Vote With Your Feet” is a public installation that asks questions for citizens, and get answers from citizens. Two doorways stand in the middle of the sidewalk, with a question displayed on a sign above them. Each door stands for an answer. Walk through the door, and your vote will be counted, viewable both at the door and on our website.

If you’d like to make one of these for yourself, here’s an Instructable on how to do it.


Core77

The Fascinating World of Japanese Videogame Arcades

This is hilarious, and a prime example of how Japan is able to perfectly blend old and new things to create unique experiences: They’ve got a virtual reality videogame called “Fear of Heights” where your sole mission is to rescue a cat that has crawled onto the edge of a plank protruding from a skyscraper. Here’s what the player sees:

Here’s what they’re actually doing:

Note the stuffed cat

If it’s not clear from the photo, the board isn’t quite fixed, but is laid atop unsteady supports that provide wobble. Coupled with the VR, it’s as low-tech and as hi-tech as you can get.

Now imagine you’re the designer of a virtual reality videogame with more action, like a first-person zombie shooter set in a hospital. The issue is that players can get so wrapped up in the action that they can lose their balance, get nauseous, fall and possibly injure themselves. How do you solve this?

In this case, the designers’ brilliant solution was to safely relegate the players to a wheelchair that they self-control with a joystick. For the able-bodied person unaccustomed to such limitations, this increases the terror factor of the zombie setting. And it means that wheelchair users that have the use of their hands get to play the game, too.

These are just a couple of the innovations enjoyed by attendees of videogame arcades in Japan. In the following video, George Weldman of the Super Bunnyhop channel runs through a bunch of them and explains some of the cool interfaces. He also puts on his sociologist hat and puts forth a theory for why arcades in Japan enjoy a popularity not seen elsewhere, based on the existence of both a comprehensive train system and a cash economy:


Core77

The Fascinating World of Japanese Videogame Arcades

This is hilarious, and a prime example of how Japan is able to perfectly blend old and new things to create unique experiences: They’ve got a virtual reality videogame called “Fear of Heights” where your sole mission is to rescue a cat that has crawled onto the edge of a plank protruding from a skyscraper. Here’s what the player sees:

Here’s what they’re actually doing:

Note the stuffed cat

If it’s not clear from the photo, the board isn’t quite fixed, but is laid atop unsteady supports that provide wobble. Coupled with the VR, it’s as low-tech and as hi-tech as you can get.

Now imagine you’re the designer of a virtual reality videogame with more action, like a first-person zombie shooter set in a hospital. The issue is that players can get so wrapped up in the action that they can lose their balance, get nauseous, fall and possibly injure themselves. How do you solve this?

In this case, the designers’ brilliant solution was to safely relegate the players to a wheelchair that they self-control with a joystick. For the able-bodied person unaccustomed to such limitations, this increases the terror factor of the zombie setting. And it means that wheelchair users that have the use of their hands get to play the game, too.

These are just a couple of the innovations enjoyed by attendees of videogame arcades in Japan. In the following video, George Weldman of the Super Bunnyhop channel runs through a bunch of them and explains some of the cool interfaces. He also puts on his sociologist hat and puts forth a theory for why arcades in Japan enjoy a popularity not seen elsewhere, based on the existence of both a comprehensive train system and a cash economy:


Core77

Amazing Travel Photos From Around The World By Travis Bruke

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Responsibilities, time, money these are the three most important things in our life that hold us back. We always dream about a life of adventure. But Travis Burke is living proof that the only thing stopping you is you, and that all you need to live the dream is a camper van, a camera, and a burning desire for adventure. He is a photographer and traveler. He enjoys traveling in his grandma’s old van, he converted into a fully habitable home. He funds his travels via a combination of photography, product testing, writing reviews, and general freelancing work, and as he writes on his website.

More info: Travis Bruke, Instagram

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

The Fascinating World of Japanese Videogame Arcades

This is hilarious, and a prime example of how Japan is able to perfectly blend old and new things to create unique experiences: They’ve got a virtual reality videogame called “Fear of Heights” where your sole mission is to rescue a cat that has crawled onto the edge of a plank protruding from a skyscraper. Here’s what the player sees:

Here’s what they’re actually doing:

Note the stuffed cat

If it’s not clear from the photo, the board isn’t quite fixed, but is laid atop unsteady supports that provide wobble. Coupled with the VR, it’s as low-tech and as hi-tech as you can get.

Now imagine you’re the designer of a virtual reality videogame with more action, like a first-person zombie shooter set in a hospital. The issue is that players can get so wrapped up in the action that they can lose their balance, get nauseous, fall and possibly injure themselves. How do you solve this?

In this case, the designers’ brilliant solution was to safely relegate the players to a wheelchair that they self-control with a joystick. For the able-bodied person unaccustomed to such limitations, this increases the terror factor of the zombie setting. And it means that wheelchair users that have the use of their hands get to play the game, too.

These are just a couple of the innovations enjoyed by attendees of videogame arcades in Japan. In the following video, George Weldman of the Super Bunnyhop channel runs through a bunch of them and explains some of the cool interfaces. He also puts on his sociologist hat and puts forth a theory for why arcades in Japan enjoy a popularity not seen elsewhere, based on the existence of both a comprehensive train system and a cash economy:


Core77