Tag Archives: Workbench

2018 Chevy Corvette ZR1 hints appear in GM Ordering Workbench

GM's internal Ordering Workbench lists ZR1 Blue brake calipers and a ZR1-specific gas guzzler tax in the order books for the 2018 Chevy Corvette.

Continue reading 2018 Chevy Corvette ZR1 hints appear in GM Ordering Workbench

2018 Chevy Corvette ZR1 hints appear in GM Ordering Workbench originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 17 Apr 2017 18:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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How to Make a Passive Concrete Speaker, Build a Tabletop Workbench, Forge a Damascus Steel Chisel & More

Forging a Damascus Steel Chisel

The aptly-named Andy Steele is an enthusiastic, improbably-young-looking 21st-Century blacksmith and the latest addition to our Makers Roundup. Here he forges Damascus steel into a Japanese-style chisel for The Samurai Carpenter:

How to Make a Large Bluetooth Scoreboard

Bob Clagett walks you through how he made this Arduino-based remote-controlled scoreboard. Along the way he runs into a couple of issues and solves them on the fly:

The GluBot, and a Discount

Ron Paulk runs down his favorite glue bottle, his sponsor FastCap’s GluBot, and also offers a discount code:

Concrete Passive Speaker Cube

Linn from Darbin Orvar creates a no-electricity-required passive speaker for her phone out of concrete and wood:

Mini Tabletop Workbench

Laura Kampf builds a nifty benchtop mini workbench, complete with dog holes and a tailvise:

Drill Press Depth Stop And Key Holder

This one reminds me of prototyping class at ID school. Here John Heisz creates a more ergonomic depth stop and chuck key holder for his drill press:


Core77

How to Make a Passive Concrete Speaker, Build a Tabletop Workbench, Forge a Damascus Steel Chisel & More

Forging a Damascus Steel Chisel

The aptly-named Andy Steele is an enthusiastic, improbably-young-looking 21st-Century blacksmith and the latest addition to our Makers Roundup. Here he forges Damascus steel into a Japanese-style chisel for The Samurai Carpenter:

How to Make a Large Bluetooth Scoreboard

Bob Clagett walks you through how he made this Arduino-based remote-controlled scoreboard. Along the way he runs into a couple of issues and solves them on the fly:

The GluBot, and a Discount

Ron Paulk runs down his favorite glue bottle, his sponsor FastCap’s GluBot, and also offers a discount code:

Concrete Passive Speaker Cube

Linn from Darbin Orvar creates a no-electricity-required passive speaker for her phone out of concrete and wood:

Mini Tabletop Workbench

Laura Kampf builds a nifty benchtop mini workbench, complete with dog holes and a tailvise:

Drill Press Depth Stop And Key Holder

This one reminds me of prototyping class at ID school. Here John Heisz creates a more ergonomic depth stop and chuck key holder for his drill press:


Core77

How to Make a Passive Concrete Speaker, Build a Tabletop Workbench, Forge a Damascus Steel Chisel & More

Forging a Damascus Steel Chisel

The aptly-named Andy Steele is an enthusiastic, improbably-young-looking 21st-Century blacksmith and the latest addition to our Makers Roundup. Here he forges Damascus steel into a Japanese-style chisel for The Samurai Carpenter:

How to Make a Large Bluetooth Scoreboard

Bob Clagett walks you through how he made this Arduino-based remote-controlled scoreboard. Along the way he runs into a couple of issues and solves them on the fly:

The GluBot, and a Discount

Ron Paulk runs down his favorite glue bottle, his sponsor FastCap’s GluBot, and also offers a discount code:

Concrete Passive Speaker Cube

Linn from Darbin Orvar creates a no-electricity-required passive speaker for her phone out of concrete and wood:

Mini Tabletop Workbench

Laura Kampf builds a nifty benchtop mini workbench, complete with dog holes and a tailvise:

Drill Press Depth Stop And Key Holder

This one reminds me of prototyping class at ID school. Here John Heisz creates a more ergonomic depth stop and chuck key holder for his drill press:


Core77

How to Make a Passive Concrete Speaker, Build a Tabletop Workbench, Forge a Damascus Steel Chisel & More

Forging a Damascus Steel Chisel

The aptly-named Andy Steele is an enthusiastic, improbably-young-looking 21st-Century blacksmith and the latest addition to our Makers Roundup. Here he forges Damascus steel into a Japanese-style chisel for The Samurai Carpenter:

How to Make a Large Bluetooth Scoreboard

Bob Clagett walks you through how he made this Arduino-based remote-controlled scoreboard. Along the way he runs into a couple of issues and solves them on the fly:

The GluBot, and a Discount

Ron Paulk runs down his favorite glue bottle, his sponsor FastCap’s GluBot, and also offers a discount code:

Concrete Passive Speaker Cube

Linn from Darbin Orvar creates a no-electricity-required passive speaker for her phone out of concrete and wood:

Mini Tabletop Workbench

Laura Kampf builds a nifty benchtop mini workbench, complete with dog holes and a tailvise:

Drill Press Depth Stop And Key Holder

This one reminds me of prototyping class at ID school. Here John Heisz creates a more ergonomic depth stop and chuck key holder for his drill press:


Core77

How to Make a Passive Concrete Speaker, Build a Tabletop Workbench, Forge a Damascus Steel Chisel & More

Forging a Damascus Steel Chisel

The aptly-named Andy Steele is an enthusiastic, improbably-young-looking 21st-Century blacksmith and the latest addition to our Makers Roundup. Here he forges Damascus steel into a Japanese-style chisel for The Samurai Carpenter:

How to Make a Large Bluetooth Scoreboard

Bob Clagett walks you through how he made this Arduino-based remote-controlled scoreboard. Along the way he runs into a couple of issues and solves them on the fly:

The GluBot, and a Discount

Ron Paulk runs down his favorite glue bottle, his sponsor FastCap’s GluBot, and also offers a discount code:

Concrete Passive Speaker Cube

Linn from Darbin Orvar creates a no-electricity-required passive speaker for her phone out of concrete and wood:

Mini Tabletop Workbench

Laura Kampf builds a nifty benchtop mini workbench, complete with dog holes and a tailvise:

Drill Press Depth Stop And Key Holder

This one reminds me of prototyping class at ID school. Here John Heisz creates a more ergonomic depth stop and chuck key holder for his drill press:


Core77

How to Make a Passive Concrete Speaker, Build a Tabletop Workbench, Forge a Damascus Steel Chisel & More

Forging a Damascus Steel Chisel

The aptly-named Andy Steele is an enthusiastic, improbably-young-looking 21st-Century blacksmith and the latest addition to our Makers Roundup. Here he forges Damascus steel into a Japanese-style chisel for The Samurai Carpenter:

How to Make a Large Bluetooth Scoreboard

Bob Clagett walks you through how he made this Arduino-based remote-controlled scoreboard. Along the way he runs into a couple of issues and solves them on the fly:

The GluBot, and a Discount

Ron Paulk runs down his favorite glue bottle, his sponsor FastCap’s GluBot, and also offers a discount code:

Concrete Passive Speaker Cube

Linn from Darbin Orvar creates a no-electricity-required passive speaker for her phone out of concrete and wood:

Mini Tabletop Workbench

Laura Kampf builds a nifty benchtop mini workbench, complete with dog holes and a tailvise:

Drill Press Depth Stop And Key Holder

This one reminds me of prototyping class at ID school. Here John Heisz creates a more ergonomic depth stop and chuck key holder for his drill press:


Core77

How to Make a Passive Concrete Speaker, Build a Tabletop Workbench, Forge a Damascus Steel Chisel & More

Forging a Damascus Steel Chisel

The aptly-named Andy Steele is an enthusiastic, improbably-young-looking 21st-Century blacksmith and the latest addition to our Makers Roundup. Here he forges Damascus steel into a Japanese-style chisel for The Samurai Carpenter:

How to Make a Large Bluetooth Scoreboard

Bob Clagett walks you through how he made this Arduino-based remote-controlled scoreboard. Along the way he runs into a couple of issues and solves them on the fly:

The GluBot, and a Discount

Ron Paulk runs down his favorite glue bottle, his sponsor FastCap’s GluBot, and also offers a discount code:

Concrete Passive Speaker Cube

Linn from Darbin Orvar creates a no-electricity-required passive speaker for her phone out of concrete and wood:

Mini Tabletop Workbench

Laura Kampf builds a nifty benchtop mini workbench, complete with dog holes and a tailvise:

Drill Press Depth Stop And Key Holder

This one reminds me of prototyping class at ID school. Here John Heisz creates a more ergonomic depth stop and chuck key holder for his drill press:


Core77

How to Determine the Proper Dimensions For Your Own Workbench

Building your own workbench, or modifying an existing one, to better suit your specific dimensions, can pay huge dividends in terms of ergonomics. And this is one instance where consulting ergonomics manuals and diagrams to come up with a height isn’t going to help you, because those are made for the 95th percentile, and this bench is made specifically for you.

Therefore the best starting point is to consider what type of work you often do, what tools you use, what operations you perform, and where things will be stowed during your workflow. Here Jim Tolpin, the proponent of working out dimensions By Hand & Eye, explains how he determines the correct dimensions of his own workbenches:


Core77

The WorkMo Portable Workbench System

In the post on tool van organization systems, you saw how the traveling craftsperson can transport all of their equipment. But once they arrive on site, they need to set up some sort of station where they can execute the work. Once upon a time a dusty pair of beat-up sawhorses, a board and some banged-up toolboxes would do, but in modern-day Germany, appearances are as important as function. Hence Sortimo has intelligently designed a neater-looking system called WorkMo (for “work mobility”) that enables a craftsperson to efficiently set up a multifunctional workstation, one that incorporates the storage cases we looked at here.

In its folded-up mobile state it’s got a compact footprint that makes it easy to get into an elevator.

On location the worksurface, which can be something as simple as a sheet of plywood, is detached. There are only legs on one side; in the interest of minimalism, the unit holding the stack of storage containers serves as the other support.

That’s the kit in its most basic form. But for greater functionality, one can use a perforated top like what you’d see on Festool’s MFT (multi-function table).

This provides a variety of clamping options for working on pieces of various shapes.

A vise can be affixed to the side, providing the functionality of the traditional face vise you’d see on a proper workbench.

The aluminum extrusions used for the side rails are sized so that clamps can slide into them, for holding taller workpieces at the appropriate height.

The base cabinet features a powerstrip and storage on one side. On the other side is a slotted rack on which to hang tool holders.

And talk about loyalty—you’ve gotta love how the tool selection in the promo shots is all-German. In the shots above and below we see gear from Bessey, Bosch, ECE and Wera.

I can’t place the brand of the unusual handplane you see in the photo directly above, but I know the type and spotted one at the show. We’ll have an entry on that shortly.

Lastly, here’s a video look at the system:

More from Core77’s coverage of this year’s Holz-Handwerk Show!


Core77

The WorkMo Portable Workbench System

In the post on tool van organization systems, you saw how the traveling craftsperson can transport all of their equipment. But once they arrive on site, they need to set up some sort of station where they can execute the work. Once upon a time a dusty pair of beat-up sawhorses, a board and some banged-up toolboxes would do, but in modern-day Germany, appearances are as important as function. Hence Sortimo has intelligently designed a neater-looking system called WorkMo (for “work mobility”) that enables a craftsperson to efficiently set up a multifunctional workstation, one that incorporates the storage cases we looked at here.

In its folded-up mobile state it’s got a compact footprint that makes it easy to get into an elevator.

On location the worksurface, which can be something as simple as a sheet of plywood, is detached. There are only legs on one side; in the interest of minimalism, the unit holding the stack of storage containers serves as the other support.

That’s the kit in its most basic form. But for greater functionality, one can use a perforated top like what you’d see on Festool’s MFT (multi-function table).

This provides a variety of clamping options for working on pieces of various shapes.

A vise can be affixed to the side, providing the functionality of the traditional face vise you’d see on a proper workbench.

The aluminum extrusions used for the side rails are sized so that clamps can slide into them, for holding taller workpieces at the appropriate height.

The base cabinet features a powerstrip and storage on one side. On the other side is a slotted rack on which to hang tool holders.

And talk about loyalty—you’ve gotta love how the tool selection in the promo shots is all-German. In the shots above and below we see gear from Bessey, Bosch, ECE and Wera.

I can’t place the brand of the unusual handplane you see in the photo directly above, but I know the type and spotted one at the show. We’ll have an entry on that shortly.

Lastly, here’s a video look at the system:

More from Core77’s coverage of this year’s Holz-Handwerk Show!


Core77

The WorkMo Portable Workbench System

In the post on tool van organization systems, you saw how the traveling craftsperson can transport all of their equipment. But once they arrive on site, they need to set up some sort of station where they can execute the work. Once upon a time a dusty pair of beat-up sawhorses, a board and some banged-up toolboxes would do, but in modern-day Germany, appearances are as important as function. Hence Sortimo has intelligently designed a neater-looking system called WorkMo (for “work mobility”) that enables a craftsperson to efficiently set up a multifunctional workstation, one that incorporates the storage cases we looked at here.

In its folded-up mobile state it’s got a compact footprint that makes it easy to get into an elevator.

On location the worksurface, which can be something as simple as a sheet of plywood, is detached. There are only legs on one side; in the interest of minimalism, the unit holding the stack of storage containers serves as the other support.

That’s the kit in its most basic form. But for greater functionality, one can use a perforated top like what you’d see on Festool’s MFT (multi-function table).

This provides a variety of clamping options for working on pieces of various shapes.

A vise can be affixed to the side, providing the functionality of the traditional face vise you’d see on a proper workbench.

The aluminum extrusions used for the side rails are sized so that clamps can slide into them, for holding taller workpieces at the appropriate height.

The base cabinet features a powerstrip and storage on one side. On the other side is a slotted rack on which to hang tool holders.

And talk about loyalty—you’ve gotta love how the tool selection in the promo shots is all-German. In the shots above and below we see gear from Bessey, Bosch, ECE and Wera.

I can’t place the brand of the unusual handplane you see in the photo directly above, but I know the type and spotted one at the show. We’ll have an entry on that shortly.

Lastly, here’s a video look at the system:

More from Core77’s coverage of this year’s Holz-Handwerk Show!


Core77

Lee Valley Releases Special “VOUBO” Workbench Design as Elaborate April Fools Gag

Is the famous Roubo workbench not for you, with its traditional floor-standing ways? Well, today a select group of lucky buyers can plunk down $ 1,200 for the Veritas VOUBO, or Vertically Oriented Utility Bench Offering. Check out the features of this innovation-packed design:

All I can say is, you have to be impressed at the length some folks will go to for a one-day gag.


Core77

Choosing a Table Saw, Workbench Porn and an April Fool’s Woodworking Technique 

The Joy of Woodworking

Who knew Matthias Wandel was a Bob Ross fan? In this April Fools video, Wandel channels Ross to show off his magical woodworking techniques:

Reclaimed Wood Bench

A quick, efficient build: This week La Fabrique DIY knocks out a bench made from reclaimed wood. At the end there, you can see them sealing up the holes for the lag bolts; do you reckon they’re actually using hot glue, as it looks like, or do you think they used something resinous in stick form?

Tabletop Fastening Hardware

This week Izzy Swan gives us a more in-depth demo of his new fastening invention, the Izzy Skirt Washers. To refresh your memory, these allow you to affix a tabletop to the apron in such a way that you no longer need worry about wood movement. Also, in the last video, he cut the holes with a two-step process; but here he shows you a faster way using a countersink bit.

The Samurai Carpenter’s Workbench Features and Specs

Last time Jesse de Geest gave us a porntastic look at his heirloom-quality workbench. This time he runs through its functions and features, showing us that it’s not only beautiful, but cleverly designed:

Chainsawing Slabs

What do you do when your friend’s neighbor has a maple tree on their property that needs to be removed? If you’re Frank Howarth, you drive over there with a couple of chainsaws to get some slabs out of it. Also, for you Howarth fans who are chainsaw-savvy, here’s your chance to help the man out: He’s got some tool-specific questions for you at the end.

The One-Year Easter Egg

Here’s a second one from Frank Howarth, because he’s a maniac. This one was fun to watch because he started it a year ago, became sidetracked by his kitchen remodel, then returned to the half-finished box of parts and had to remember what he was trying to do.

Upgrading the Air Quality in Your Shop

Marc Spagnuolo’s back, this time discussing a shop issue that old-timers might ignore: Air quality. You only need to read one or two stories about folks that can no longer work wood because they’ve developed respiratory problems before you start thinking about this too. Here Spagnuolo shows you the steps he’s taken to ensure he’s breathing in clean air rather than sawdust:

Shop Hardware Storage

April Wilkerson needs to upgrade an earlier solution she’s outgrown, so this week she builds a higher-capacity hardware storage system. It features removable bins on French cleats for convenience, and to keep the system out of the way when it’s not being accessed, she’s found a handy place to put it:

Workbench Upgrades

No build video this week from Jay Bates, instead it’s about something equally important: Workstation optimization. Here Bates shows you the small but crucial modifications he’s made to his self-built workbench in order to ensure a smooth, efficient workflow:

Quiz Game Buttons

Bob Clagett continues his recent run of combining woodworking and electronics to create items his kids can enjoy. This time around, he’s worked up game-show-style buzzers that his kids can press during quiz games. (There’s no actual buzzing sound, but they illuminate to indicate who hit the button first.)

What Kind of Table Saw Do You Need?

Here Linn from Darbin Orvar goes over her choice of table saw, a contractor-style model. She highlights the design feature that sold her on it and explains why you don’t necessarily need a cabinet saw to do work:


Core77

An Epic Workbench, Complicated Joinery Made Simple, a New Hardware Invention and More

The Workbench to End All Workbenches

WOW. Jesse de Geest finally shows the video of him building his epic workbench, and it’s every bit as awesome as it was hyped to be. For those of you who haven’t been following, de Geest was determined to build his workbench like a fine piece of furniture, an heirloom that would be passed down to subsequent generations of his family. And his intention shows:

A New Type of Hardware for Fastening Tabletops

Pretty cool: Izzy Swan has invented a piece of hardware that is now being manufactured and sold by FastCap. As Swan walks you through an end table build, he shows you how his Izzy Skirt Washers can be used to securely affix a tabletop while the slotted design allows for wood movement, permitting your tabletop to seasonally expand and contract without warping or cracking.

Experimental Lathe-and-CNC-Made Bowl

In order to become good at making things, you need to develop a mastery of skills through repetition. But it’s also equally important to explore techniques you’ve never tried before. Hence Frank Howarth experiments here with cutting concentric rings out of a single board, then glueing it up into a bowl he can turn on the lathe before adding some details on his new CNC tilting end table:

Mallet Madness

Depending on the kind of work you do you’ll find a mallet either handy, for the occasional persuasion-fit, or indispensable, for driving chisels. Here Jay Bates shows you two methods for making your own. The first method relies primarily on hand tools, while the second method is for those that prefer power tools:

Making Elaborate Joinery Simple

Another from Jay Bates: In this one he demonstrates a classic joinery technique for keeping tabletops flat over time, while still allowing for expansion and contraction: The breadboard end. Bates adds his own twist by incorporating a through-mortise, and we get to see the meticulous nature that makes Jay Bates, Jay Bates as he agonizes over an error that resulted in a visible wedge being 1/16th of an inch off. (Bates, no one will notice, the piece is beautiful!)

Wood and Steel Bathroom Cabinet

Using nothing but common big-box hardware store materials, Steve Ramsey builds an improbably handsome bathroom cabinet. Just goes to show you what some stain and spraypaint can accomplish. He also recovers from a mid-project error, and has a piece of good luck with the final distance of the door swing:

Angle-Top Cabinet Install

Being able to use the awkward space where an angled ceiling meets a low wall, as in an attic, is often challenging. Here Sandra Powell, a/k/a Sawdust Girl, shows us how she got the most out of it by designing and installing angle-topped cabinets to fill the void:

Lego Build Table

Jeez Louise. Bob Clagett already had our Father of the Year award for his epic arcade cabinet build, but here he goes the distance again, this time crafting a well-designed Lego Build Table for the Clagett brood:

Ipe-Topped Media Cabinet

Here Linn from Darbin Orvar bangs out a mightily impressive media cabinet, with an Ipe top and self-turned legs and knobs. As always, she helpfully highlights which products and tools she’s using, and why. (I’ve gotta say though, watching her using the doweling jig made me want to call Festool up and beg them to give her a Domino!)


Core77

Yea or Nay? The Plank-Topped English-Style Workbench

Given current trends in woodworking, every single solid-wood workbench I’ve seen features a top consisting of boards glued face-to-face, with the side grain pointing up. (See: Jay Bates’ workbench build in our Weekly Maker’s Roundup.) This is believed to be a French convention, and the design relies on mass for stability. It also requires a lot of wood.

The traditional English workbench, in contrast, is far more parsimonious in its use of materials. With the English style the stability comes from engineering rather than mass, with massive stretchers but a relatively lightweight top. In the video below Richard Maguire, a/k/a The English Woodworker, shows you his simple plank-top design:

What surprised me, and what is not obvious from viewing the video, is that the top uses no glue at all and is instead affixed by nails. Writes Maguire,

…The boards which make the top are all independent of each other. They’re not glued together, but instead laid on to the frame of the bench and fixed down with a gap between each of the boards.

As a rule they’re going to be thin boards 2? and under and faily wide, 6? to 12? or so….

How do we do it? Nail it down. Straight through the top.

Reason one – timber movement.
Nails will flex and bend allowing the boards to expand and contract in to those gaps we’ve left. Screws are hard and brittle so require elongated holes to achieve the same, but we want our boards fixed down here.

Reason two – consider your plane irons. Nailing through the top might sound strange, but I’d rather see the enemy and be able to punch it down than screw from underneath and encounter a stealth demon later on. Remember the top’s quite thin.

The idea makes me a bit queasy, as klutz that I am, I’m certain I’d eventually run a plane iron over a nailhead while reflattening. However, I don’t have anything like Maguire’s experience, so I have to assume there are benefits to the design. Speaking of which:

Why a planked top? We’ve already explained that it’s simple, but thin softwood tops can be one of the big turn offs for the English style bench. In 10 – 15 years of hard use and regular flattening you might not actually have much top left.

With a planked top the solution is easy as you can simply rip off an individual board and replace it quickly and cheaply. I still don’t belive that the majority of benches built will ever require the top replacing, but it’s good peace of mind for the over thinkers. Also having this in mind will allow you to use your bench top in ways that you would never dream to do with a fully fledged hardwood top.

So, makers: What say you? I can’t deny that the design makes far more economical use of materials than what I’ve seen, but I’m curious to hear what you all think of the pluses and minuses.

Lastly, Maguire’s video above is a promo for an online course he’s running, where he will show you how to make the bench in a five-hour, eight-chapter format complete with PDF plans. The price of entry is £26.00 (USD ~$ 40), a steal when you consider the price of a traditional brick-and-mortar woodworking class. We’re curious: How many of you would pay for detailed, project-based online instruction? It does seem to be the way things are going these days.


Core77