Tag Archives: weekly

Weekly Roundup: Intel buys Mobileye for $15.3B, Uber’s navigation for drivers improves

 This week four people were accused of hacking at least 500 million Yahoo accounts, Spotify partnered with Waze and Intel bought computer vision company Mobileye. These are the top stories of the week, and you can also get this post as a weekly newsletter in your inbox, if you prefer. 1. The U.S. Department of Justice accused of two Russian FSB officers and two criminal hackers of… Read More


TechCrunch

Rain’s Weekly Design Minutiae: Environmental Disaster, Neatly Packaged

I ordered two items from Staples and they arrived today. Here they are, the boxes laid on a grid of inches for scale.

Inside the first box are paper towels that fit the dispenser in my photo studio. The box is perfectly sized to the amount of paper towels within, there’s not a wasted inch.

Opening the second box, we see a strip of plastic air pockets…

…protecting the cargo within.

Below is the amount of materials required to ship me this SR44 battery for my digital calipers.

The battery is small enough that I could swallow it but the box it came in is larger than my head.

So why is it packaged this way, because Staples loves wasting cardboard and plastic? No. Either they or whomever they’ve subcontracted their fulfillment out to undoubtedly has some warehouse system in place, a series of pickers, packagers, conveyor belts, automatic labelers, scanning machines and vehicle-loading infrastructure, that is designed to handle cardboard boxes of sizes common to the majority of their wares.

At some point a Staples bean counter undoubtedly realized that the above-depicted scenario would take place. And realized that because of the scale that they’re operating at, it doesn’t matter. With their expensive and efficient systems in place, it would cost them more money to have someone pop the battery in a small padded envelope, write my address on it with a Bic pen, slap a couple stamps on it and walk it over to a U.S.P.S. mailbox. And their protocols prevent them from opening the paper towel box, dropping the battery in there and taping the box back up.

I’m sure they’ve figured out the macro stuff, and that their system is somehow the least wasteful when viewed from 10,000 feet. At least, that’s what I want to believe. It’s just hard to swallow that wasting this much material in this individual case is somehow logical.


Core77

Rain’s Weekly Design Minutiae: How the Red & Blue Chair Seat/Back are Connected to the Frame

This is the second piece of furniture I ever built. It’s a duplicate of Gerrit Rietveld’s Red & Blue Chair, designed in 1919. I built mine in the early ’90s, before the internet, and I found a book in the library that had a drawing very similar to the one below:

From that I broke out an architect’s scale and was able to reverse engineer the dimensions, then construct the chair. I was shocked at how comfortable it is, being made out of hard wood; the ergonomics are just perfect.

For the frame Rietveld used beech, which I couldn’t get my hands on, so I milled some Poplar down. For the seat and backrest I used the same material he had, plywood (1/2″ in my case). I painted mine blue and purple because I thought it looked better.

When I was building it, one thing I couldn’t tell by looking at the diagram was how the seat and backrest were connected to the frame. I ended up drilling directly through them and into the crossmembers, then gluing in dowels. It was a real hack job; not only ugly, but they broke when a heavyset friend of mine sat in the chair and I had to reglue them.

I recently did some online searches to find out how they were originally joined, and could find nothing. In every photo I see, the seat/back joinery is obscured.

But the other day I passed the Cassina showroom in SoHo. They’ve licensed the chair and have one on the floor. I went inside and the staff ignored me while I got down on my hands and knees to peer under it and see how both were connected. I was dying to know what wondrous, magical joinery technique Rietveld had employed.

I was surprised to find it was nothing more than L-brackets, the kind you get for a few cents at your local hardware store, that were slightly bent to suit the angle. Here’s what I mean:

Anyways, I couldn’t find this information online, so now I’m posting it in the hopes that the next person who searches for it will find this. I cannot legally recommend that you knock the chair off, but if you want to build one for your own edification it’s fun and you will be surprised at how comfy the chair is to sit in, even for long stretches.


Core77

Rain’s Weekly Design Minutiae: How the Red & Blue Chair Seat/Back are Connected to the Frame

This is the second piece of furniture I ever built. It’s a duplicate of Gerrit Rietveld’s Red & Blue Chair, designed in 1919. I built mine in the early ’90s, before the internet, and I found a book in the library that had a drawing very similar to the one below:

From that I broke out an architect’s scale and was able to reverse engineer the dimensions, then construct the chair. I was shocked at how comfortable it is, being made out of hard wood; the ergonomics are just perfect.

For the frame Rietveld used beech, which I couldn’t get my hands on, so I milled some Poplar down. For the seat and backrest I used the same material he had, plywood (1/2″ in my case). I painted mine blue and purple because I thought it looked better.

When I was building it, one thing I couldn’t tell by looking at the diagram was how the seat and backrest were connected to the frame. I ended up drilling directly through them and into the crossmembers, then gluing in dowels. It was a real hack job; not only ugly, but they broke when a heavyset friend of mine sat in the chair and I had to reglue them.

I recently did some online searches to find out how they were originally joined, and could find nothing. In every photo I see, the seat/back joinery is obscured.

But the other day I passed the Cassina showroom in SoHo. They’ve licensed the chair and have one on the floor. I went inside and the staff ignored me while I got down on my hands and knees to peer under it and see how both were connected. I was dying to know what wondrous, magical joinery technique Rietveld had employed.

I was surprised to find it was nothing more than L-brackets, the kind you get for a few cents at your local hardware store, that were slightly bent to suit the angle. Here’s what I mean:

Anyways, I couldn’t find this information online, so now I’m posting it in the hopes that the next person who searches for it will find this. I cannot legally recommend that you knock the chair off, but if you want to build one for your own edification it’s fun and you will be surprised at how comfy the chair is to sit in, even for long stretches.


Core77

Rain’s Weekly Design Minutiae: How the Red & Blue Chair Seat/Back are Connected to the Frame

This is the second piece of furniture I ever built. It’s a duplicate of Gerrit Rietveld’s Red & Blue Chair, designed in 1919. I built mine in the early ’90s, before the internet, and I found a book in the library that had a drawing very similar to the one below:

From that I broke out an architect’s scale and was able to reverse engineer the dimensions, then construct the chair. I was shocked at how comfortable it is, being made out of hard wood; the ergonomics are just perfect.

For the frame Rietveld used beech, which I couldn’t get my hands on, so I milled some Poplar down. For the seat and backrest I used the same material he had, plywood (1/2″ in my case). I painted mine blue and purple because I thought it looked better.

When I was building it, one thing I couldn’t tell by looking at the diagram was how the seat and backrest were connected to the frame. I ended up drilling directly through them and into the crossmembers, then gluing in dowels. It was a real hack job; not only ugly, but they broke when a heavyset friend of mine sat in the chair and I had to reglue them.

I recently did some online searches to find out how they were originally joined, and could find nothing. In every photo I see, the seat/back joinery is obscured.

But the other day I passed the Cassina showroom in SoHo. They’ve licensed the chair and have one on the floor. I went inside and the staff ignored me while I got down on my hands and knees to peer under it and see how both were connected. I was dying to know what wondrous, magical joinery technique Rietveld had employed.

I was surprised to find it was nothing more than L-brackets, the kind you get for a few cents at your local hardware store, that were slightly bent to suit the angle. Here’s what I mean:

Anyways, I couldn’t find this information online, so now I’m posting it in the hopes that the next person who searches for it will find this. I cannot legally recommend that you knock the chair off, but if you want to build one for your own edification it’s fun and you will be surprised at how comfy the chair is to sit in, even for long stretches.


Core77

Weekly Makers Roundup Special

Linn from Darbin Orvar is back with another three-person, three-video tips series, this time featuring Laura Kampf and Cris from Get Hands Ditry. In the first video Linn covers measuring tools, Cris demonstrates a drawer installation fix and Laura shares masking tips:

In the second Cris tals about what motivates her and can motivate you, Linn talks magnets and Laura offers marking tips:

And in the third Laura covers lifehacks including a quick-and-dirty sketchbook pen holder and her safety glasses alternative, Linn talks about the effectiveness of shellac for finishing and even sealing out bad smells and Cris offers a tip for how to easily create a larger hole, as a countersink, around a smaller hole.


Core77

Weekly Makers Roundup Special

Linn from Darbin Orvar is back with another three-person, three-video tips series, this time featuring Laura Kampf and Cris from Get Hands Ditry. In the first video Linn covers measuring tools, Cris demonstrates a drawer installation fix and Laura shares masking tips:

In the second Cris tals about what motivates her and can motivate you, Linn talks magnets and Laura offers marking tips:

And in the third Laura covers lifehacks including a quick-and-dirty sketchbook pen holder and her safety glasses alternative, Linn talks about the effectiveness of shellac for finishing and even sealing out bad smells and Cris offers a tip for how to easily create a larger hole, as a countersink, around a smaller hole.


Core77

Weekly Makers Roundup Special

Linn from Darbin Orvar is back with another three-person, three-video tips series, this time featuring Laura Kampf and Cris from Get Hands Ditry. In the first video Linn covers measuring tools, Cris demonstrates a drawer installation fix and Laura shares masking tips:

In the second Cris tals about what motivates her and can motivate you, Linn talks magnets and Laura offers marking tips:

And in the third Laura covers lifehacks including a quick-and-dirty sketchbook pen holder and her safety glasses alternative, Linn talks about the effectiveness of shellac for finishing and even sealing out bad smells and Cris offers a tip for how to easily create a larger hole, as a countersink, around a smaller hole.


Core77

Weekly Makers Roundup Special

Linn from Darbin Orvar is back with another three-person, three-video tips series, this time featuring Laura Kampf and Cris from Get Hands Ditry. In the first video Linn covers measuring tools, Cris demonstrates a drawer installation fix and Laura shares masking tips:

In the second Cris tals about what motivates her and can motivate you, Linn talks magnets and Laura offers marking tips:

And in the third Laura covers lifehacks including a quick-and-dirty sketchbook pen holder and her safety glasses alternative, Linn talks about the effectiveness of shellac for finishing and even sealing out bad smells and Cris offers a tip for how to easily create a larger hole, as a countersink, around a smaller hole.


Core77

Weekly Makers Roundup Special

Linn from Darbin Orvar is back with another three-person, three-video tips series, this time featuring Laura Kampf and Cris from Get Hands Ditry. In the first video Linn covers measuring tools, Cris demonstrates a drawer installation fix and Laura shares masking tips:

In the second Cris tals about what motivates her and can motivate you, Linn talks magnets and Laura offers marking tips:

And in the third Laura covers lifehacks including a quick-and-dirty sketchbook pen holder and her safety glasses alternative, Linn talks about the effectiveness of shellac for finishing and even sealing out bad smells and Cris offers a tip for how to easily create a larger hole, as a countersink, around a smaller hole.


Core77

Weekly Makers Roundup Special

Linn from Darbin Orvar is back with another three-person, three-video tips series, this time featuring Laura Kampf and Cris from Get Hands Ditry. In the first video Linn covers measuring tools, Cris demonstrates a drawer installation fix and Laura shares masking tips:

In the second Cris tals about what motivates her and can motivate you, Linn talks magnets and Laura offers marking tips:

And in the third Laura covers lifehacks including a quick-and-dirty sketchbook pen holder and her safety glasses alternative, Linn talks about the effectiveness of shellac for finishing and even sealing out bad smells and Cris offers a tip for how to easily create a larger hole, as a countersink, around a smaller hole.


Core77

Weekly Makers Roundup Special

Linn from Darbin Orvar is back with another three-person, three-video tips series, this time featuring Laura Kampf and Cris from Get Hands Ditry. In the first video Linn covers measuring tools, Cris demonstrates a drawer installation fix and Laura shares masking tips:

In the second Cris tals about what motivates her and can motivate you, Linn talks magnets and Laura offers marking tips:

And in the third Laura covers lifehacks including a quick-and-dirty sketchbook pen holder and her safety glasses alternative, Linn talks about the effectiveness of shellac for finishing and even sealing out bad smells and Cris offers a tip for how to easily create a larger hole, as a countersink, around a smaller hole.


Core77

Weekly Makers Roundup Special

Linn from Darbin Orvar is back with another three-person, three-video tips series, this time featuring Laura Kampf and Cris from Get Hands Ditry. In the first video Linn covers measuring tools, Cris demonstrates a drawer installation fix and Laura shares masking tips:

In the second Cris tals about what motivates her and can motivate you, Linn talks magnets and Laura offers marking tips:

And in the third Laura covers lifehacks including a quick-and-dirty sketchbook pen holder and her safety glasses alternative, Linn talks about the effectiveness of shellac for finishing and even sealing out bad smells and Cris offers a tip for how to easily create a larger hole, as a countersink, around a smaller hole.


Core77

Weekly Makers Roundup Special

Linn from Darbin Orvar is back with another three-person, three-video tips series, this time featuring Laura Kampf and Cris from Get Hands Ditry. In the first video Linn covers measuring tools, Cris demonstrates a drawer installation fix and Laura shares masking tips:

In the second Cris tals about what motivates her and can motivate you, Linn talks magnets and Laura offers marking tips:

And in the third Laura covers lifehacks including a quick-and-dirty sketchbook pen holder and her safety glasses alternative, Linn talks about the effectiveness of shellac for finishing and even sealing out bad smells and Cris offers a tip for how to easily create a larger hole, as a countersink, around a smaller hole.


Core77

Weekly Rewind: DIY beer from your phone, robot soccer, Android Nougat, and more

In the tech world, a lot happens in a week. So much news goes on, in fact, that it’s almost impossible for mere mortals with real lives to keep track of everything. That’s why we’ve compiled a quick and dirty list of the top 10 tech stories.

The post Weekly Rewind: DIY beer from your phone, robot soccer, Android Nougat, and more appeared first on Digital Trends.

Digital Trends

Weekly Maker’s Roundup

Arcade Cabinet Build, Part 2

Bob Clagett continues to amaze with Part 2 of his epic arcade cabinet build. This video, which is every bit as dense as Part 1, contains clear explanations and some great examples of both careful forethought and improvisation to overcome something not fitting right.

Router Tips and Tricks

Jimmy DiResta delivers another of his Tips videos, compressing forty years’ worth of efficiency tricks into one video. This time the subject is routers: What you need to check for in a bearing-guided flush trim bit, even a new one? What’s a good way to cut circles without the cord getting tangled? What should you do with the other collet to avoid losing it? And plenty more. There are also some cameos from both Spike the Cat and Mr. Troll.

Making a Hinge out of Leather

We get two videos from Izzy Swan this week and they’re both quick. In the first here he shows you how to make a leather hinge. What’s it for? You’ll see in the vid, but let’s just say that those of you who sharpen at the grinding wheel might find this handy.

Prototyping Process for Transforming Furniture

In the second Swan video we get to see his prototyping-on-the-cheap process. Here he goes over the “discovery build” for the three-way piece of furniture he showed us last week:

The Argument for a Fine, Pricey, Self-Built Workbench

When it comes to self-made workbenches, craftspeople are all over the map: Some favor making utilitarian ones out of inexpensive wood, others are fine with a solid-core door on sawhorses, still others build high-labor Roubo replicas. Jesse de Geest’s position is that his workbench will be a family heirloom, and here explains why he’s building it the way he is:

Workbench Drawers

Matthias Wandel continues with his metalworking bench, fabricating and adding the drawers this time. What’s great about this generation of YouTube makers is that they often show you the mistakes they make in the middle of a project, and demonstrate how they overcame them; here Wandel has to tackle some mis-cut mortises and tenons to get his drawers back into square.

Finishing Up in the Kitchen

Frank Howarth brings us back to his kitchen remodeling job, revealing the component that’s been left unfinished for several months. Here he begins the process of finishing up the family’s breakfast bar, and he takes the time to add a bit of Howarth whimsy.

A New Woodworking Podcast

No build from the busy Jay Bates this week, but a couple of announcements: The first is for those of you that’d like to meet Bates and will be in the Atlanta area in early April for The Woodworking Show, and the second is that he’s started up a podcast along with fellow makers Nick Ferry and April Wilkerson:

Quick and Easy Clamp Storage

Speaking of April Wilkerson, she’s back in her shop this week and cranks out some quick, easy clamp storage using nothing but cutoffs and scraps. While this system won’t work for those of you with sheetrock or cinderblock walls, if your walls are plywood or OSB this oughta do the trick:

Framing Walls on the Tiny House

Ana and Jacob White continue building their tiny-house-on-a-trailer, this time framing out the walls, then muscling them into position and tying them all together. This is a great look at basic construction principles, with the Whites explaining why things are done the way they are and in what sequence.


Core77

Weekly Maker’s Roundup

Arcade Cabinet Build, Part 2

Bob Clagett continues to amaze with Part 2 of his epic arcade cabinet build. This video, which is every bit as dense as Part 1, contains clear explanations and some great examples of both careful forethought and improvisation to overcome something not fitting right.

Router Tips and Tricks

Jimmy DiResta delivers another of his Tips videos, compressing forty years’ worth of efficiency tricks into one video. This time the subject is routers: What you need to check for in a bearing-guided flush trim bit, even a new one? What’s a good way to cut circles without the cord getting tangled? What should you do with the other collet to avoid losing it? And plenty more. There are also some cameos from both Spike the Cat and Mr. Troll.

Making a Hinge out of Leather

We get two videos from Izzy Swan this week and they’re both quick. In the first here he shows you how to make a leather hinge. What’s it for? You’ll see in the vid, but let’s just say that those of you who sharpen at the grinding wheel might find this handy.

Prototyping Process for Transforming Furniture

In the second Swan video we get to see his prototyping-on-the-cheap process. Here he goes over the “discovery build” for the three-way piece of furniture he showed us last week:

The Argument for a Fine, Pricey, Self-Built Workbench

When it comes to self-made workbenches, craftspeople are all over the map: Some favor making utilitarian ones out of inexpensive wood, others are fine with a solid-core door on sawhorses, still others build high-labor Roubo replicas. Jesse de Geest’s position is that his workbench will be a family heirloom, and here explains why he’s building it the way he is:

Workbench Drawers

Matthias Wandel continues with his metalworking bench, fabricating and adding the drawers this time. What’s great about this generation of YouTube makers is that they often show you the mistakes they make in the middle of a project, and demonstrate how they overcame them; here Wandel has to tackle some mis-cut mortises and tenons to get his drawers back into square.

Finishing Up in the Kitchen

Frank Howarth brings us back to his kitchen remodeling job, revealing the component that’s been left unfinished for several months. Here he begins the process of finishing up the family’s breakfast bar, and he takes the time to add a bit of Howarth whimsy.

A New Woodworking Podcast

No build from the busy Jay Bates this week, but a couple of announcements: The first is for those of you that’d like to meet Bates and will be in the Atlanta area in early April for The Woodworking Show, and the second is that he’s started up a podcast along with fellow makers Nick Ferry and April Wilkerson:

Quick and Easy Clamp Storage

Speaking of April Wilkerson, she’s back in her shop this week and cranks out some quick, easy clamp storage using nothing but cutoffs and scraps. While this system won’t work for those of you with sheetrock or cinderblock walls, if your walls are plywood or OSB this oughta do the trick:

Framing Walls on the Tiny House

Ana and Jacob White continue building their tiny-house-on-a-trailer, this time framing out the walls, then muscling them into position and tying them all together. This is a great look at basic construction principles, with the Whites explaining why things are done the way they are and in what sequence.


Core77

Weekly Maker’s Roundup

How to Price Your Work

We’ve gotta kick this one off with some sound business advice. For those of you that make things and sell them, David Picciuto explains a simple, logical way to calculate how much to charge:

Chess Board with Storage Drawer

Remember all of those chess pieces Jimmy DiResta milled and cast? Those aren’t much good without a board to play the game on, so this week Jimmy cranks out a pretty sweet one with a pull-out storage drawer. Building tricks abound here: I’m digging his wedge-based glue-up jig for the squares, using pushpins as detail clamps, and the way he creates those classy corners:

DIY Dog Hole Clamps

Side-action cam clamps that you can drop into dogholes are pretty handy. They’re also fiendishly expensive. So Izzy Swan figured out a way you can make your own, for just a few bucks. Here he builds two sets, one out of plywood, the other from oak, to see if there are any performance differences:

Trimming a Mirror with Aluminum

The great thing about aluminum is that you can cut it with common woodworking tools. Here Steve Ramsey continues his bathroom renovation and shows you how easy it is to integrate aluminum into a woodworking project:

Wall-Mounted Jewelry Storage System

Also continuing with her bathroom spruce-up, and coincidentally also incorporating aluminum, here April Wilkerson knocks out a series of DIY wall-mounted jewelry holders. I love the bit at the end when her husband walks in:

A Man of Many Vises

With his new, beefy workbench put together, Jay Bates now needs to kit it out with vises. He’s opted for not two, but three: A tail vise, leg vise and an inexpensive, DIY pipe clamp version of a twin screw vise:

A Tiny House for the Alaskan Wilderness

Ana White reveals the design of her and husband Jacob’s movable tiny house, specifically designed so that they can execute in-the-wilderness builds while bringing their two kids along, housing them in comfort, and feeding a crew. We get to see some of Ana’s design skills here, as she’s had to incorporate a couple of features atypical of a tiny house due to their needs. At the end we get a sneak peek of the structure they’ve already roughed out, and Ana’s enthusiasm is contagious!

360-Degree Shop Tour

This is so cool! This week Bob Clagett gives us a tour of his shop, but shot the entire video with his 360-degree camera, so you can look all around his shop at will. If you watch it on your phone, there’s no need to click and drag–just rotate your phone around and it’s like you’re there.

The Paulk Standing Desk is in the Works

Just a teaser video from Ron Paulk this week, who gives us a glimpse of his next project: A standing desk. Can’t wait to see how this one turns out, and based on the drawing he shows us, I’m very curious to see how he’ll engineer some ridigity into that center section.

One From the Archives: The Samurai Carpenter’s Top 10 Woodworking Books

I was surprised to learn that master builder Jesse de Geest learned much of his craft by reading books and then practicing; with his skillset, it seemed more like he’d gone through multiple apprenticeships. Here he runs down his top ten tomes:


Core77

Weekly Maker’s Roundup

Bit Storage Drawer

Sandra Powell, a/k/a Sawdust Girl, shows us how she put together her functional, organized, multilevel drill-and-driver-bit storage drawer:

LED Bicycle Wheels

Back in that sweet Parisian workshop, the La Fabrique DIY channel shows you how to add some highly-visible, waterproof LED lighting to your bike wheels, for better nighttime safety:

DIY Block Plane

Talk about eyeballing skills: Matthias Wandel makes a wooden-body block plane, without taking a single measurement that we could see, basing the design on his tiny modelmaker’s plane. He ergonomicizes the form and even makes the freaking blade:

DIY Gantry Crane

Frank Howarth has an easy way of lifting extraordinarily heavy items and machines in his shop and moving them around: His DIY gantry crane. You’ve undoubtedly seen it in the background, or in use in the foreground, in his other videos. Here he explains how it’s put together, and why he designed it the way he did.

Rotating 3D Printer Workstation

Bob Clagett comes up with a great way to make changing filaments on his 3D printer, which requires getting around to the back of it, quicker and easier:

Bathroom-Based DIY, 1

April Wilkerson spruces up her bathroom counter and sink with some unconventional design techniques, adding countertop storage and dividing a large single mirror into two smaller ones, without having to cut any glass:

Bathroom-Based DIY, 2

Steve Ramsey tackles the problem of not being able to access under-sink storage in a tight bathroom space:

Installing Kitchen Cabinets

Homebuilder Ron Paulk shows you his tricks of the trade for hanging and installing kitchen cabinets. Here we see how decades of experience pays off with careful forethought, smart preparation and gathering the right (sometimes surprising, in the case of the bucket) tools:

Multipurpose Tiny House Project

It looks like Ana White’s TV deal may have gotten extended. She reveals the surprise that while she and husband Jacob were building a cabin in the Alaskan wilderness and being recorded by HGTV, they weren’t going back to a hotel at night; they were living out of a tent, with their two kids! To remedy that living challenge, they’re working on a tiny house they can live in, and feed crews out of, during future in-the-wild builds.

Build Your Own Workbench On the Cheap:

You can’t get a lot of building done without some sort of workbench. It’s common for beginners to start off with something as humble as a door across sawhorses, but when you’re ready to build your own, check out Jay Bates’ demo:


Core77