Tag Archives: weekend

What to watch this weekend in racing

Nascar has events over March 17, March 18, and March 19 at the Phoenix International Raceway. The Xfinity Series at Phoenix and the Camping World 500.

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What to watch this weekend in racing originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 17 Mar 2017 18:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Drive Safe: 438 people will die on US roads over Labor Day weekend

The National Safety Council estimates that 438 people will be killed in car accidents in the United States over the Labor Day holiday period in 2016.

Continue reading Drive Safe: 438 people will die on US roads over Labor Day weekend

Drive Safe: 438 people will die on US roads over Labor Day weekend originally appeared on Autoblog on Sat, 03 Sep 2016 17:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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8 Things to Co-Create this Labor Day Weekend After You Score Your Core77 Conference Ticket

You know what Labor Day means—back to school, back to work…and finally buying that much-coveted Core77 Conference ticket, of course! In honor of our conference’s co-creation theme, here’s a list of activities to help promote some good ol’ American group bonding this Labor Day Weekend. Back away from that flat screen TV and get co-creating!

8. Go-Karts are so 2002—Build your own Cooler-Scooter and host a Cooler Scooter Race. It doesn’t get more American than this. Pro-tip: carry booze to your destination inside of your scooter, but avoid drinking and scooting.

7. Channel the energy and teamwork of this Pyrotechnics group. It’s time to make up for your 4th of July fireworks fail—no dogs allowed this time.

6. Pimp your boat, together. Here’s some inspiration.

5. How to get people to go fishing with you on said boat: make this primitive fish spear and allow people to watch you attempt to use it…entertainment guaranteed.

4. Assemble the Avengers to build Captain America’s shield from titanium. The kids will love this appropriate family activity.

3. During an intense sand castle competition, surprise your competitors with an abstract sand sculpture instead of a typical castle. Your design will look so artistic, no-one will know you free-formed the entire design process. 

2. Kindle your camping fire with Doritos and use the leftovers for walking tacos. The fact that these “cheesy” chips can start fires is alarming, but they still taste darn good with taco meat.

1. Set up an epic walking taco bar on this massive farmhouse table or collaborate on delicious eats at a backyard communal BBQ party

When co-creating with family and friends, remember that things can get a little heated. During competitions and group bonding activities, remind yourselves to enjoy the holiday weekend and the time you’re spending together.

Learn more about co-creation at this September’s Core77 Conference in LA. Buy your ticket today!


Core77

Weekend Reads: The Awkward History of Time Capsules and the Most Expensive Homes in Every State. Also, Why Does Burger King Have its Own Sauna?

Core77’s editors spend time combing through the news so you don’t have to. Here’s a weekly roundup of our favorite stories from the World Wide Web.

Now Booking

Incorporating the terrain of the surrounding landscape and creating apertures to take in the sky and the sea, the radical architect Antti Lovag introduced the world to his concrete Bubble House concept in the 1970s. Now, Lovag’s first residential project, Maison Bernard completed in 1971 in the South of France, is open to the public after a five year renovation overseen by the architect Odile Decq.

—Linyee Yuan, managing editor

David Hockney Paints Yosemite—on an iPad

Hockney’s at it again. This time the 78-year-old painter, printmaker and photographer takes on Yosemite, depicting glorious landscapes using an iPad screen as his canvas. I enjoyed this coverage of his latest series, “The Yosemite Suite,” currently on view at Pace Gallery, by Erica Bellman for the New York Times Style Magazine.

—Carly Ayres, columnist, In the Details

Naked Lunch

In a stroke of branding genius, a Burger King in Helsinki has opened an in-store sauna for your dining pleasure. Designed by Teuvo Loman, the sauna has room for 15 patrons who can order their Whoppers in the most traditional of Finnish settings.

—Rebecca Veit, columnist, Designing Women

The Most Expensive Home Listing in Every State 2016

Today I’m reading—and drooling over the photos in—Forbes’ roundup of the best residences from each of the 50 states plus Washington, D.C. It’s amazing to see what you get for your money in each region. I instinctively scrolled down first to the New York listing, which I found both obscenely priced and stylistically unappealing. Out of all of the listings, my absolute favorite was Colorado. I only need to come up with $ 80 million and that property could be mine.

—Rain Noe, senior editor

Brag to the Future

An entertaining piece scanning the incredibly long history of time capsules and their inevitable awkwardness, also showing how the ephemeral objects within reveal some fascinating human tendencies that transcend fleeting cultural moments. This hilarious passage about sums it up: “‘One of the functions of time capsules is glorified advertisement or boasting,’ says [librarian William] Jarvis. To ensure their brag sheets’ longevity, the Assyrian kings ended messages by asking future finders to hype up their accomplishments, like an old-school reblog request. Many courted populist cred: In what Jarvis describes as an early PR move, Mesopotamian time capsules found hidden in walls specifically mention the high wages of the wall-builders.”

—Allison Fonder, community manager

The Questions Each State Googles More Than Any Other State

Sometimes weird, sometimes sad, but consistently hilarious, this map documents the questions each state googles more often than any other state (scroll down to see the list of runners-up). 

—Alexandra Alexa, editorial assistant

Glitchy Rugs

Could you use some more color today? Or more fun texture? Or a reminder that if you’d gone into law you could be filling your house with sumptuous international art by now? Might be time for a refresher on Faig Ahmed‘s beautiful, twisted take on traditional Azerbaijani rugs.

—Kat Bauman, contributing writer


Core77

Weekend Reads: The Awkward History of Time Capsules and the Most Expensive Homes in Every State. Also, Why Does Burger King Have its Own Sauna?

Core77’s editors spend time combing through the news so you don’t have to. Here’s a weekly roundup of our favorite stories from the World Wide Web.

Now Booking

Incorporating the terrain of the surrounding landscape and creating apertures to take in the sky and the sea, the radical architect Antti Lovag introduced the world to his concrete Bubble House concept in the 1970s. Now, Lovag’s first residential project, Maison Bernard completed in 1971 in the South of France, is open to the public after a five year renovation overseen by the architect Odile Decq.

—Linyee Yuan, managing editor

David Hockney Paints Yosemite—on an iPad

Hockney’s at it again. This time the 78-year-old painter, printmaker and photographer takes on Yosemite, depicting glorious landscapes using an iPad screen as his canvas. I enjoyed this coverage of his latest series, “The Yosemite Suite,” currently on view at Pace Gallery, by Erica Bellman for the New York Times Style Magazine.

—Carly Ayres, columnist, In the Details

Naked Lunch

In a stroke of branding genius, a Burger King in Helsinki has opened an in-store sauna for your dining pleasure. Designed by Teuvo Loman, the sauna has room for 15 patrons who can order their Whoppers in the most traditional of Finnish settings.

—Rebecca Veit, columnist, Designing Women

The Most Expensive Home Listing in Every State 2016

Today I’m reading—and drooling over the photos in—Forbes’ roundup of the best residences from each of the 50 states plus Washington, D.C. It’s amazing to see what you get for your money in each region. I instinctively scrolled down first to the New York listing, which I found both obscenely priced and stylistically unappealing. Out of all of the listings, my absolute favorite was Colorado. I only need to come up with $ 80 million and that property could be mine.

—Rain Noe, senior editor

Brag to the Future

An entertaining piece scanning the incredibly long history of time capsules and their inevitable awkwardness, also showing how the ephemeral objects within reveal some fascinating human tendencies that transcend fleeting cultural moments. This hilarious passage about sums it up: “‘One of the functions of time capsules is glorified advertisement or boasting,’ says [librarian William] Jarvis. To ensure their brag sheets’ longevity, the Assyrian kings ended messages by asking future finders to hype up their accomplishments, like an old-school reblog request. Many courted populist cred: In what Jarvis describes as an early PR move, Mesopotamian time capsules found hidden in walls specifically mention the high wages of the wall-builders.”

—Allison Fonder, community manager

The Questions Each State Googles More Than Any Other State

Sometimes weird, sometimes sad, but consistently hilarious, this map documents the questions each state googles more often than any other state (scroll down to see the list of runners-up). 

—Alexandra Alexa, editorial assistant

Glitchy Rugs

Could you use some more color today? Or more fun texture? Or a reminder that if you’d gone into law you could be filling your house with sumptuous international art by now? Might be time for a refresher on Faig Ahmed‘s beautiful, twisted take on traditional Azerbaijani rugs.

—Kat Bauman, contributing writer


Core77

Weekend Reads: Meet the Father of Stainless Steel and a Critique of the “Secrets to Creativity” Self-Help Craze

Core77’s editors spend time combing through the news so you don’t have to. Here’s a weekly roundup of our favorite stories from the World Wide Web.

Maximum Efficiency

I won’t lie, all those Soylent billboards that have been sprouting up around L.A. are working on me. All the nutrients you need in one bottle with none of the cooking, chewing or dish-doing? Sign me up! But wait, it gets even better, because Soylent has commissioned Berlin-based fashion designer Nhu Duong to create utilitarian uniforms for the company. Maybe in the not-too-distant future we’ll all velcro into our jumpsuits, slam a Soylent and get to work. 

Rebecca Veit, columnist, Designing Women

Portugal Power

Last week Portugal claimed a clean energy milestone by powering the entire country for four consecutive days on renewable energy alone. A combination of wind, solar and hydro-generated electricity kept the lights on for an 107-hour run. The news of Portugal’s success is an exciting glimpse at how green energy could reshape the energy industry in Europe and beyond.

—Linyee Yuan, managing editor

The Restaurant Inside a High Security Prison

There is a wide range of statistical evidence showing that educating prisoners dramatically reduces their chance of returning to prison, which is one driving inspiration for The Clink, a London-based charity running four gourmet restaurants inside prisons where meals are expertly prepared by prisoners nearing the end of their sentences—”‘Prisoners get the chance to learn practical skills with which we can try to help them get jobs,’ says Chris Moore, the chief executive of Clink. ‘But the soft skills are as important: Confidence, motivation, pride and waking up in the morning with a sense of purpose.'”

—Allison Fonder, community manager

Creative Vacuum: The Latest Vogue in Success Literature Showcases an Ugly Elitism

“There is something about the merging of bossery and nonconformity that beguiles the American mind. The genre marches irresistibly from triumph to triumph. Books pondering the way creative minds work dominate business-best-seller lists. Airport newsstands seem to have been converted wholly to the propagation of the faith. Travel writers and speechwriters alike have seen the light and now busy themselves revealing the brain’s secrets to aspiring professionals.”

—Eric Ludlum, editorial director

The Father of Modern Metal

This excerpt from Jonathan Waldman’s forthcoming book, Rust: The Longest War, tells the captivating tale of Harry Brearley, a man who “saw himself as steel’s savior, its priest” and, through sheer determination, brought us stainless steel. It’s a story of vision. As Brearley himself puts it: “The range of the mind’s eye is restricted by the skill of the hand. The castles in the air must conform to the possibilities of material things—border-line possibilities perhaps; or, if something beyond the known border is required, the plan must wait until other dreams come true.”

—Alexandra Alexa, editorial assistant


Core77

What to See This Weekend at Sight Unseen OFFSITE

Sight Unseen OFFSITE kicked off this Friday morning and is, as always, bold and full of fresh energy from young emerging designers. Presenting works from Sight Unseen mainstays along with a number of compelling newcomers, this designer fair for the hip and eccentric is sure to excite.

Here are just a few highlights from this morning’s press presentation:

Lost in the Matrix

A staple for Sight Unseen OFFSITE, Print All Over Me presents a truly disorienting immersive installation this year in collaboration with Various Projects and Wallpaper Projects filled with grid-upholstered furniture and dot matrix wallpaper. 

Bathing in Sound

When entering the OFFSITE space, you are immediately thrown into the Twilight Zone with this installation by architecture studio Leong Leong in partnership with ARUP for Ford. The project, a “sound bath” made of thousands of foam rollers and mirrors, picksup surrounding sounds to create a contorted ambient soundscape and an illusory space meant to feel boundless. 

Shelves in Any Size

These ultra-cool shelves by Los Angeles based Norma Studio are a simple modular collection of red oak panels and dowels—the shelves are endlessly customizable so you can arrange them in multiple configurations and all the pieces connect using a simple threading system. 

The Beauty of Laminate

Designer Brooke Intrachat of LA-based Ouli design studio created a series of furniture pieces for OFFSITE using Arborite laminate—the collaboration between the small studio and the material manufacturer demonstrates the subdued beauty and versatility of the material, and is elegantly paired through the collection with exotic woods and powder-coated steel for dynamic effect. 

Inspired by Type

These exploratory furniture works by New York based designer Brendan Timmins are inspired by linguistic typology forms.

Psychedelic Ceramic 

Trippy works in wood and ceramic by Pat Kim and Julianne Ahn of Object & Totem. 

Shakers in the Modern Age

The pieces created for “Furnishing Utopia“, a series of Shaker-inspired furniture and objects by 11 modern design studios, will also be on display throughout the weekend in the OFFSITE space. 

Sight Unseen OFFSITE is now open to the public through Monday, May 16th on the 15th Floor of The GRACE Building in Manhattan. 


Core77

What to See at Collective Design This Weekend

Showcasing a series of diverse galleries and exhibitors brought together by their focus on innovation in both vintage and contemporary design, Collective is an important anchor event during the festivities of NYCxDesign. 

The show does a great job of incorporating site-specific, commissioned installations throughout the fair, allowing for a more in-depth exploration of ideas. This year, Nendo and Cranbrook Academy of Art are the subjects of special spotlight exhibitions that highlight their respective influence on the design world right now. We were especially excited about the launch of Collective Concept, a platform for independent studios who don’t have traditional gallery representation to present their work and ideas. 

Without further ado, here are our must-see picks:  

Fort Standard

Brooklyn-based Fort Standard, a partnership made up of Pratt graduates Gregory Buntain and Ian Collings, is casting the most traditional, natural materials—wood, stone and leather—in a new light. The large wardrobe pictured above is made of soapstone, carved with woodworking tools until it was thin and light enough to work as a cabinet. Through experimentation, the duo has pushed the materials to their structural limits—creating pieces that are sculptural, functional and refreshing in their simplicity.

Ian Stell at Patrick Parrish Gallery

Ian Stell is showcasing the latest works in his spellbinding series of transforming pieces, painstakingly crafted out of wood and brass pivots. The latest evolution of the work features the use of color laminate, a move that further complicates the way we read the surface of each piece as it contracts and expands in its various incarnations. 

Collective Influence: Nendo

Each year, Collective highlights the career and work of a single designer or studio. This year, Tokyo-based nendo is front and center with an installation of lighting and cabinets located in the entrance to the fair. The exhibit highlights the studio’s iterative process with several dozen variations of cabinets that translate a sense of movement through an abstract notation of the way drawers swing open and close. 

Cranbrook Academy of Art: Fine Design for the End of the World

Frank McGovern, Oxidation Table
Vineta Chugh, Global Population: Year 0/ 1986/2015
Evan Fay, Vine Chair

An exhibition of graduate work from the Cranbrook Academy of Art’s department of 3D Design explores apocalyptic ideas through critical, reflective design objects. Some of the projects hint at the theme formally, like Frank McGovern’s tesselated table (pictured above), which adapts patchwork quilting techniques in steel, using the material’s rusted patina to suggest a sense of decay. Likewise, Evan Fay’s Vine Chair suggests a sense of “beauty in chaos” through a complex tangle of steel, brass, foam and scuba knit fabric. Other projects are more grounded in a critique of our present condition. Vineta Chugh’s lamp series takes population data and translates it into little architectural forms—as the data increases, the light becomes dimmed through “the weight of all these passengers.”

Chris Wolston at Sight Unseen

The Brooklyn and Medellín-based designer expands on his trademark technique of aluminum sand-casting in this new collection, shown against a bespoke wallpaper he collaborated on with Designtex. Wolston applies the technique to aluminum foam sheeting most commonly found in architectural sound-proofing to create a discordant collection of tables, lighting, seating and tabletop objects. 

Studio Proba X Bower at Sight Unseen

Studio Proba and Bower teamed up to present a multi-sensory immersive installation for Sight Unseen. With a recurring water element throughout the pieces, the setup establishes a tranquil, meditative environment as a welcome respite and counterbalance to the hectic nature of design fairs.

Jay Sae Jung Oh at Johnson Trading Gallery

The Korean-born designer has developed a complex technique that creates very unexpected objects. She starts with a base piece, in this case a small sofa, and adds a collage of other objects on top of it—it’s a pretty fun guessing game trying to figure out what’s underneath—then wraps the resulting assemblage in thin leather strips, a process that takes at least six months from start to finish. 

CW&T, Presented by A/D/O: Roto-Jam

Art and design studio CW&T is on site, working on their process piece, Roto-Jam. Their material exploration has led them to a process of particle jamming, to produce thin-shelled casts out of re-usable, dynamic molds. Check out the video below to see it in action:

Jan de Swart at Converso

If intricate wood carvings are your jam, make sure to stop by Converso’s booth, showcasing mid-century modernists Jan de Swart and Wendell Castle through a variety of functional designs as well as some purely sculptural eye-candy, like the intricate ship carving pictured above. 

Shizue Imai at Cocobolo

Shizue Imai’s ceramic works draw on classic and primitive techniques and references from Africa, Asia and the Americas. The experimental works feel both ancient and modern, elegant and raw—and demonstrate the endless potential of ceramic as a material and process. 

Collective Design is on view through Sunday, May 8th.


Core77

What to See at Collective Design This Weekend

Showcasing a series of diverse galleries and exhibitors brought together by their focus on innovation in both vintage and contemporary design, Collective is an important anchor event during the festivities of NYCxDesign. 

The show does a great job of incorporating site-specific, commissioned installations throughout the fair, allowing for a more in-depth exploration of ideas. This year, Nendo and Cranbrook Academy of Art are the subjects of special spotlight exhibitions that highlight their respective influence on the design world right now. We were especially excited about the launch of Collective Concept, a platform for independent studios who don’t have traditional gallery representation to present their work and ideas. 

Without further ado, here are our must-see picks:  

Fort Standard

Brooklyn-based Fort Standard, a partnership made up of Pratt graduates Gregory Buntain and Ian Collings, is casting the most traditional, natural materials—wood, stone and leather—in a new light. The large wardrobe pictured above is made of soapstone, carved with woodworking tools until it was thin and light enough to work as a cabinet. Through experimentation, the duo has pushed the materials to their structural limits—creating pieces that are sculptural, functional and refreshing in their simplicity.

Ian Stell at Patrick Parrish Gallery

Ian Stell is showcasing the latest works in his spellbinding series of transforming pieces, painstakingly crafted out of wood and brass pivots. The latest evolution of the work features the use of color laminate, a move that further complicates the way we read the surface of each piece as it contracts and expands in its various incarnations. 

Collective Influence: Nendo

Each year, Collective highlights the career and work of a single designer or studio. This year, Tokyo-based nendo is front and center with an installation of lighting and cabinets located in the entrance to the fair. The exhibit highlights the studio’s iterative process with several dozen variations of cabinets that translate a sense of movement through an abstract notation of the way drawers swing open and close. 

Cranbrook Academy of Art: Fine Design for the End of the World

Frank McGovern, Oxidation Table
Vineta Chugh, Global Population: Year 0/ 1986/2015
Evan Fay, Vine Chair

An exhibition of graduate work from the Cranbrook Academy of Art’s department of 3D Design explores apocalyptic ideas through critical, reflective design objects. Some of the projects hint at the theme formally, like Frank McGovern’s tesselated table (pictured above), which adapts patchwork quilting techniques in steel, using the material’s rusted patina to suggest a sense of decay. Likewise, Evan Fay’s Vine Chair suggests a sense of “beauty in chaos” through a complex tangle of steel, brass, foam and scuba knit fabric. Other projects are more grounded in a critique of our present condition. Vineta Chugh’s lamp series takes population data and translates it into little architectural forms—as the data increases, the light becomes dimmed through “the weight of all these passengers.”

Chris Wolston at Sight Unseen

The Brooklyn and Medellín-based designer expands on his trademark technique of aluminum sand-casting in this new collection, shown against a bespoke wallpaper he collaborated on with Designtex. Wolston applies the technique to aluminum foam sheeting most commonly found in architectural sound-proofing to create a discordant collection of tables, lighting, seating and tabletop objects. 

Studio Proba X Bower at Sight Unseen

Studio Proba and Bower teamed up to present a multi-sensory immersive installation for Sight Unseen. With a recurring water element throughout the pieces, the setup establishes a tranquil, meditative environment as a welcome respite and counterbalance to the hectic nature of design fairs.

Jay Sae Jung Oh at Johnson Trading Gallery

The Korean-born designer has developed a complex technique that creates very unexpected objects. She starts with a base piece, in this case a small sofa, and adds a collage of other objects on top of it—it’s a pretty fun guessing game trying to figure out what’s underneath—then wraps the resulting assemblage in thin leather strips, a process that takes at least six months from start to finish. 

CW&T, Presented by A/D/O: Roto-Jam

Art and design studio CW&T is on site, working on their process piece, Roto-Jam. Their material exploration has led them to a process of particle jamming, to produce thin-shelled casts out of re-usable, dynamic molds. Check out the video below to see it in action:

Jan de Swart at Converso

If intricate wood carvings are your jam, make sure to stop by Converso’s booth, showcasing mid-century modernists Jan de Swart and Wendell Castle through a variety of functional designs as well as some purely sculptural eye-candy, like the intricate ship carving pictured above. 

Shizue Imai at Cocobolo

Shizue Imai’s ceramic works draw on classic and primitive techniques and references from Africa, Asia and the Americas. The experimental works feel both ancient and modern, elegant and raw—and demonstrate the endless potential of ceramic as a material and process. 

Collective Design is on view through Sunday, May 8th.


Core77