Tag Archives: week

Milan Design Week 2017: Form Follows Fiction

As the industry’s biggest annual trade fair, the Salone del Mobile is certainly an occasion to reflect on the state of design today—both implicitly and explicitly as certain schools and organizations take the opportunity to critique the commercial pretense of both the Salone and the mobile. This year, two venues in particular captured a more cerebral notion of design week, though the skepticism—about making more stuff—also took various forms around Milan.

Once again, Atelier Clerici—a perennial exhibition set in the eponymous Palazzo in the heart of Milan—served as a kind of embassy for Dutch design, anchored by the Design Academy Eindhoven and a half-dozen kindred spirits. (Full disclosure: I am currently a student in the Masters Design Curating & Writing program at the DAE.) Curated by Jan Boelen, the head of the Masters in Social Design, the heady exhibition was conceived as a high-concept critique of contemporary newsmedia in the context of design weeks, Milan, and reportage in general. Set in a darkened mock TV studio, the slick production value of #TVClerici relegated artifacts to the periphery of the double-height space, such that the daily performances would literally take center stage. 

Enter a uccaption (optional)

Once again, Atelier Clerici—a perennial exhibition set in the eponymous Palazzo in the heart of Milan — served as a kind of embassy for Dutch design, anchored by the Design Academy Eindhoven and a half-dozen kindred spirits. (Full disclosure: I am currently a student in the Masters Design Curating & Writing program at the DAE.) Curated by Jan Boelen, the head of the Masters in Social Design, the heady exhibition was conceived as a high-concept critique of contemporary newsmedia in the context of design weeks, Milan, and reportage in general. Set in a darkened mock TV studio, the slick production value of #TVClerici relegated artifacts to the periphery of the double-height space, such that the daily performances would literally take center stage.

With the galleria transformed into a black-box playhouse, #TVClerici could best be described as an overambitious bit of theater, brazenly skipping ahead to meta-meta-level critique as a performance about media. In that sense, the concept soared over the heads of visitors without quite scratching the surface of the sensationalist culture it set out to expose, not so much a mirror for society but rather another spectacle among others. After all, a daily series of scheduled performances — staged, semi-scripted segments—are not fictional events but decidedly real ones.

Contrived though the “look behind the curtain” may have been, the concept stopped short of onanism, thanks largely to the pseudo-professional production (down to the trucker caps) and earnest dramaturgy (i.e. recent grad Olle Lundin). All told, #TVClerici did offer commentary on specific issues in culture —gender, identity, etc. — precisely by renouncing design and aspiring to art.

The balance of the offerings at Atelier Clerici were rather more conventional, with several notable presentations in the gilded halls of the neoclassical former residence. As a counterpoint to the void of the stage, two other exhibitors opted for a single massive plinth in the center of the room. Amsterdam-based periodical MacGuffin (pictured above) literally and figuratively examined the sink—each issue explores a single subject at length—while the Envisions collective reprised their graphically arresting mise-en-scène of models and form studies. (Other participants included Het Nieuwe Instituut, Fictional Journal, Space Caviar, Z33, and more; see more images below and find more details here.)

See more images of Finsa by Envisions here.

If Boelen’s boldest statement was to bring the Design Academy from the periphery of Milan (i.e. Ventura Lambrate) to the very heart of the city, it was another exhibition tucked in a relatively quiet corner of town that posed a veritable counterpoint. Isolated if not insulated from the other design week festivities, Cascina Cuccagna, a converted urban farmhouse, hosted another polemical group exhibition. 

Forgoing the knowingness of a hashtag for a pithy declaration, Capitalism Is Over was clearly billed as “a provocation or parody,” its overarching message (per the title) at once blunt and pointed. Curators Raumplan commissioned editorial and documentary photography to illustrate the point, the former imagery serving as a kind of ad campaign, the latter physically and metaphorically sited at the center of the second-story space. (In the wings around the courtyard, smaller galleries offered an eclectic mix of projects in varied media, from data visualization to spoken word, to round out the exhibition.)

The spirit of the Capitalism Is Over comes in the guise of architecture photography: On one hand, “But It Used to Be So Cool” documents Olivetti’s headquarters in Ivrea as a throwback to post-war prosperity; on the other hand, “Bigger Faster Cheaper” offers Gursky-esque imagery of IKEA and Amazon logistics hubs in Piacenza. The typewriter company, of course, represents the boom time between 1945–1975, Trente Glorieuses, since eclipsed by the rise of neo-liberal economic models that have resulted in the likes of IKEA and Amazon. The two series of photographs invite facile, fertile comparison—vaguely nationalist nostalgia versus unbounded robo-futurism—in the face of a so-called post-capitalist era, the “fictional framework” of the entire exhibition.

It was a sentiment that resonated not only throughout the Cascina Cuccagna—Capitalism Is Over also included a few room-sized installations and a single “stockroom” gallery with design objects (pictured above)—but also in other exhibitions in Ventura Lambrate.

While Kvadrat launched the much-publicized upcycling initiative Really., Design School Kolding took a more poetic approach to repurposing waste materials and offcuts. For Super Supermarket, the Danish academy partnered with the textile manufacturer and 13 other brands, from Fritz Hansen to Ecco to Royal Dansk, repackaging scraps of leather, metal, plastic, and even potato pulp into faux-grocery items. Thoughtfully conceived and executed, the retail setting offered a delightfully subversive twist on both consumption and upcycling, coming as close as possible to having one’s cake and eating it too.

But perhaps the most compelling fiction came from yet another school. Further afield in the Lambrate district, Burg Halle staged How Do We Deal with This?, a performative investigation into the topic of borders. The chainlink fence and whitewashed medical setting alluded to more pressing problems in society, those for which design alone may not be able to offer a solution, literally encapsulating the placebo effect of late-capitalist consumer culture in the form of a pill.

Ostensibly about geopolitical borders, the metaphor applies to design as well: Where do we draw the line between art and commerce? At Atelier Clerici, the DAE’s transgressive presentation format was a kind of sleight of hand, eliding the distinction between the design and how it is represented. Did #TVClerici overstep the definition of design by extending it to include media writ large—i.e. conflating TV “production” with the design and manufacturing of objects? Moreover, will capitalism ever be “over?”

Either way, the show must go on.


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Milan Design Week 2017: Best in Glass

Just over a century ago, Paul Scheerbart noted that “the new glass environment will completely transform mankind, and it remains only to wish that the new glass culture will not find too many opponents.” Captivated by Bruno Taut’s 1914 glass pavilion, the writer painted a utopian picture of a crystalline future, equally panoramic and kaleidoscopic, all thanks to the transparent building material. Suffice it to say that he would have been chagrined to learn that visitors to, say, Massimiliano Fuksas’ formidable Fieramilano spend more time in its hangar-like exhibition halls than they do admiring its soaring glass canopy (ditto I.M. Pei’s ziggurat-like Javits Center).

Architectural applications aside, “glass culture” continues to thrive at the scale of product design and craft. From a breakthrough in 3D-printed glass to a collection of pieces from weekend workshop in Portugal, here are a few noteworthy new glass projects from Milan this year.

The Mediated Matter Group – “Ancient Yet Modern”

Led by Neri Oxman, this research group at MIT’s Media Lab first published its findings in optically transparent 3D-printed glass back in 2015. Now, with G3DP2, the whiz-kids have scaled the technology up, from product scale to that of architecture. To show off their latest efforts, the Mediated Matter Group installed “Ancient Yet Modern,” a series of three freestanding columns embedded with synapse-light pulsing lights, at the Triennale di Milano.

Project Team: Chikara Inamura (project lead), Michael Stern, Daniel Lizardo, Tal Achituv, Tomer Weller, Owen Trueblood, Nassia Inglessis, Giorgia Franchin, Kelly Donovan, Peter Houk (project adviser), Prof. Neri Oxman (project and group director).

Project Associates: Andrea Magdanz, Susan Shapiro, David J. Benyosef, Mary Ann Babula, Forrest Whitcher, Robert Philips, Neils La White, Paula Aguilera, Jonathan Williams, Andy Ryan, Jeremy Flower.

Off Portugal presents Glass Cares

On the other end of the proverbial spectrum, OFF Portugal took the time-honored tack of gathering designers for a weekend workshop — in this case, glass-blowing in Marinha Grande. Two days in the making as opposed to two years, the resulting ten pieces offer a nice capsule collection of Portuguese design today as young designers look to move beyond the nation’s ready association with cork. The glass workshop 

The glass workshop and exhibition in Ventura Lambrate marks the debut of OFF Portugal, a joint effort between Vicara, Arquivo 237, and Cencal; future initiatives will explore other craft and manufacturing techniques.

Participating designers: Diana Medina, Eneida Lombe Tavares, Luis Nascimento, studio ojoaoeamaria, Jorge Carreira, Paulo Sellmayer, Samuel Reis, Vitor Agostinho, Manuel Amaral Netto, and Joana Silva

Salviati presents Decode/Recode

Speaking of long traditions, Venice-based Salviati is among the world’s oldest glass factories, dating back to 1859. For this year’s Milan design week, the Murano specialists presented a pair of installations at the newly minted Ventura Centrale district, a series of cavernous makeshift galleries underneath the train tracks. For Decode/Recode, Salviati invited Luca Nichetto and Ben Gorham to create modular works of glass, “Pyrae” and “Strata.”

Having long collaborated with his fellow Venetians — Salviati produced his first piece — Nichetto developed 25 modules that are combined in different configurations to create the 53 totem-pole-like figures, each illuminated from within. Meanwhile, Gorham, a perfumer by profession, opted for luminous towers to showcase glass tiles in various textures and finishes.

Spektacularis at Matter and Muse

An entirely unexpected joint effort between Filipino industrial designers and Czech master glassblowers, Spektacularis was one of three exhibitors in Matter and Muse, which occupied a modest gallery at the Palazzo Litta. The mutual unfamiliarity yielded expected results, hybrid objets d’art that incorporate elements of both cultures.

Participating designers: Stanley Ruiz, Liliana Manahan, Gabriel Lichauco, Jiri Panicek

“Prism” collection by Tomás Alonso

Atelier Swarovski Home at Palazzo Crespi

The Austrian crystal producer unveiled its latest home decor collections, developed by designers such as 2016 Swarovski Designer of the Future winners Studio Brynjar & Veronika and Tomás Alonso, who extended his collection. Scintillating though the wares may be, the gilded setting stole the show.

“Prism” collection by Tomás Alonso
“Prism” collection by Tomás Alonso
“Currents” collection by Studio Brynjar & Veronika

Other new Swarovski Home collections (not pictured) were designed by Aldo Bakker, Barbara Barry, Andre Kikoski, and Greg Lynn.

Roll & Hill launched Ladies & Gentlemen Studio‘s new “Kazimir” chandelier at Euroluce. Art/design history buffs can probably guess which Suprematist painter inspired the Brooklyn-based duo.

Also noteworthy

Naturally, this is just a selection of works in glass from design week in Milan; here are a few others that also caught our eye at the Salone and beyond. 

The New York-based lighting company also debuted the “Coax” collection by John Hogan
Meanwhile, at SaloneSatellite, Berlin’s Mendelheit Design Lab showed a mix of products, including several glass pieces. Created in a mold made from up to 128 different blocks, the “Tombola” generative vase can take countless forms.
Germans Ermics exhibited three ombre pieces at Rossana Orlandi; the chair, in particular, is an homage to Shiro Kuramata (forgive the awkward photo and check out more on his website)


Core77

Mid Century Modern Find of the Week: Kaare Klint’s Safari Chair

This Safari Chair is one of the first pieces of Danish modern design from one of the masters of the era, Kaare Klint. Rud Rasmussen’s factory is still in business in the Norrebro neighborhood of Copenhagen and still crafts these chairs in the same way they have since the 1930s.

The Danish modern Safari Chair was designed by Kaare Klint in 1933.

The exposed oak frame uses the support of doweled rods, slung leather, and brass buckled straps. The backrest pivots for additional comfort.

The original burnt red leather provides a rustic, organic patina.

Piece: Safari Chair
Designer: Kaare Klint
Year Designed: 1933
Country of Origin: Denmark
Dimensions: 23″ wide x 23″ deep x 32″ tall
Price: $ 2,250

Core77 readers get 15% off of any purchase at Mid Century Mobler. Enter promo code MCMCORE77 at checkout.

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Note: The Core77 editors are going to fill you in on the backstory of this chair with a companion entry. Stay tuned!


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Milan Design Week 2017: Everyone is a Winner at HEAD Genève’s Salone Ludico

As of last year, mobile gaming revenue surpassed that of console and PC. Angry Birds or Pokémon Go may be great ways to kill time, but digital games need not be solitary pursuits confined to screens—on the contrary, distraction can aspire to reveal something more profound. Case in point, a series of interactive games developed by the Master students in the Media Design department of HEAD Genève, unveiled in Milan last week.

Easily a highlight of the Fuorisalone, Salone Ludico was tucked away on a side street of the Brera District, away from the bustling retail arteries where design-week revelers spill into the streets when the wine starts flowing. From April 4–9, the students transformed Mimmo Scognamiglio Artecontemporanea into a futuristic gaming den, a “salone ludico,” the latter term meaning “play.” The space may have resembled a white-walled gallery space at first glance, but the projects on view were less objets d’art than properly interactive artworks—proposals to show both for how gaming can be more than mere distraction, and  how design can mean more than just tables and chairs.

From a card game based on particle physics to a supine VR experience of the afterlife, all 12 of the projects—upwards of 18 months in the making—are thoughtfully conceived and rigorously executed. Standouts included Benoît Renaudin‘s speculative wunderkamer from 3017 (featuring Swiss-designed items enhanced by audio commentary), and Margaux Charvolin and Jessica Friedling‘s app-powered alchemical cocktail-making contraption.

“Murmures” by Benoît Renaudin
“Penultimo” by Margaux Charvolin and Jessica Friedling.
Detail view of Penultimo

But the best part was that the projects weren’t merely on view—to be admired and photographed for social media—but that they worked more or less flawlessly: Visitors could actually navigate “Bloodbank,” a side-scrolling video game, with a lit match; experience a “concert” at home via “KBPS”; and, of course, actually taste the cocktail that they just whipped up.

Doesn’t that sound better than star ratings or experience points?

“Ximoan” by Patrick Donaldson, Yoann Douillet, Raphaël Henocq and Laurent Monnet
“Oniri Islands” by Marion Bareil and Tourmaline Studio
“DarkLight” by Sarah Bourquin, Jessica Friedling, Valérie Pierrehumbert and Eun-Sun Lee
“Democrapcy” by Yoann Douillet, Mélissa Pisler, Israel Viadest, Marion Bareil and Léa Schönfelder
“Gravity” by Sébastien Beureux, Jessica Friedling, Charles-Henri Hayoz and Vincent de Vevey, adapted from PadPad by Jérémie Lasnier

More information about the exhibition and all of the projects is available at SaloneLudico.ch.


Core77

Mid Century Modern Find of the Week: 1950s V-Leg Vanity

This beautiful mid century modern vanity hails from Denmark, and was crafted sometime in the late 1950s.

Nothing is known about its designer or manufacturer, as it’s unmarked, but the build quality is exceptional, and that is reflected in the exposed joinery on the legs and throughout the case.

An articulating mirror is accented by a solid teak frame, and complimented by three lower dovetailed drawers for additional storage.

We often find vanities like this piece around Denmark, but this one in particular seems to be a true survivor, sporting its original mirror, and has nearly no wear after almost 60 years of everyday use.

Piece: Unknown
Designer: Unknown
Year of Manufacture: Late 1950s
Price: $ 2,250
Dimensions: 32″ wide x 19″ deep x 27.5″ tall (floor to table surface)/ 43.5″ tall (floor to top of mirror)

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Core77 readers get 15% off of any purchase at Mid Century Mobler. Enter promo code MCMCORE77 at checkout.
Core77

Mid Century Modern Find of the Week: 1950s V-Leg Vanity

This beautiful mid century modern vanity hails from Denmark, and was crafted sometime in the late 1950s.

Nothing is known about its designer or manufacturer, as it’s unmarked, but the build quality is exceptional, and that is reflected in the exposed joinery on the legs and throughout the case.

An articulating mirror is accented by a solid teak frame, and complimented by three lower dovetailed drawers for additional storage.

We often find vanities like this piece around Denmark, but this one in particular seems to be a true survivor, sporting its original mirror, and has nearly no wear after almost 60 years of everyday use.

Piece: Unknown
Designer: Unknown
Year of Manufacture: Late 1950s
Price: $ 2,250
Dimensions: 32″ wide x 19″ deep x 27.5″ tall (floor to table surface)/ 43.5″ tall (floor to top of mirror)

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Core77 readers get 15% off of any purchase at Mid Century Mobler. Enter promo code MCMCORE77 at checkout.
Core77

Stockholm Design Week 2017

The largest annual tradeshow for Scandinavian design takes place—fittingly, perhaps—in the middle of the long Nordic winter, when the temperature is typically hovering around freezing. Even so, the quality and quantity of the products and projects brings some 50,000 visitors to the Stockholmsmässan over the course of a week. Taking place from February 6–12, the city’s eponymous design week coincides with the Furniture & Light Fair, which ran from the 7–11th this year, featuring a tasteful selection of new and recent work by independent designers and studios alongside more commercial offerings.

We undertook a whirlwind tour of the fair, which was divided into three main sections with the usual tradeshow fare, as well as a number of special guest exhibitions throughout the Stockholmsmässan. While it was nice to see blockbuster booths from well-known Scandinavian brands such as HAY, Muuto, Normann Copenhagen, Menu, Kvadrat, etc., it was the independent brands and student presentations that offered the latest and greatest projects. 

Here are just a few highlights from the Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair 2017.

Originating from the Hancock Shaker Village in Massachusetts, “Furnishing Utopia” is an ongoing collaboration between over a dozen designers, who have revisited traditional typologies developed by “the first minimalists” from the late 1700s. The Shaker Design Project debuted at NYCxDesign last year and the latest edition includes new pieces alongside the first collection; participants include Core favs Ladies & Gentlemen Studio, Chris Specce, Studio Gorm, Gabriel Tan, Zoë Mowat, Jonah Takagi, and many more.
In the foreground: “Trestle Table” by Studio Gorm; “Brush Study” by Zoë Mowat; “Stepstool” by Anderssen & Voll
“Hancock Basket” by Studio Tolvanen; Broom and Sconce by Tom Bonamici
“Handy” folding ladder and rake by Chris Specce; “Secretary Desk” and “Woven Stools” by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio

Smaller objects such as “The Hand” by Studio Tolvanen, baskets by Studio Gorm, “Brethern Doorstops” by Gabriel Tan, and measuring tools by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio
The Danish Design Maker exhibition included 20 projects and prototypes, such as the “Sui” chair by Studio FEM
“Plusboxes” by Wednesday Architecture 

Muuto was among the many Scandinavian brands at the fair.
Curated by second-year “Design + Change” students, Linnaeus University‘s exhibition showcased speculative projects by third-year “Design and Sustainability students.
UOK” by Sofie Röjne hypothesizes products to suppress the five senses.
Xenotransplantation” by Ebba Johansson addresses organ transplanting between humans and animals, and vice versa
Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture presented “Under Bar Himmel,” a collection of bent-steel chairs.

Konstfack grad Keisuke Kawase
TORU hails from Barcelona
Studio Foy is based in Oslo

Jaime Hayon was this year’s Guest of Honor
The Spanish designer created a pavilion in the atrium of the Stockholmsmässan 
Hayon was the 14th Guest of Honor for the Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair.


Core77

IDEO’s Online Course on Design Leadership Begins Next Week

Which do you think is harder to teach: Design, or how to lead a design team? I think it’s got to be the latter, as in addition to your own crazy you’ve now got to manage other people’s crazy. I’ve started reading Ed Catmull’s “Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration” to learn more about it.

For those of you seeking more than a book on the subject, IDEO is offering a course on design leadership starting next week. IDEO CEO Tim Brown is presenting “Leading for Creativity,” a four-week course, through their online IDEO U portal starting on February 22nd.

Leading for Creativity teaches approaches that empower individuals and teams to search for innovative solutions. You’ll learn how to break down a bold vision into actionable challenges; make adjustments to culture by designing rituals and space; and guide teams into the unknown through the process of experimentation. Tim Brown, along with some of IDEO’s most experienced leaders and inspiring creative partners, will help you unlock the potential of your team or organization.

Here’s the pitch video:

In terms of time commitment, it requires roughly three hours a week—one to watch the content, two to execute the assignments and mingle in the community forum—for four weeks. The course runs $ 599 and you can get more details on it here.


Core77

This Week: Explore Experimental Joinery, the History & Development of Children’s Toys and the Work of Architect Rifat Chadirji

Jumpstart your week with our insider’s guide to events in the design world. From must-see exhibitions to insightful lectures and the competitions you need to know about—here’s the best of what’s going on, right now.

Monday

Nectar: War Upon the Bees

A visual essay centered on the way that disregard for bees and the “faster, bigger, cheaper” approach to modern food production is leading to severe consequences for human survival. Through various artistic mediums, the exhibit creates a rich compilation of imagery that evokes an important and socially engaged mission.

New York, NY. On view through February 11, 2017.

Tuesday

Joints + Bones

An exhibition that investigates the structure and connections of design, as opposed to surfaces or skins. Features international mix of emerging and established designers who have found innovative, beautiful and experimental ways of joining.

London, UK. On view through January 28, 2017.

Wednesday

Red A Lamp

Shifting Objects: Design from the M+ Collection

Featuring dozens of key objects and works—from mid-twentieth century Japanese furniture, to familiar products from Hong Kong’s manufacturing heyday, to drones, ‘copied’ goods, and digitally-enabled and open-source practices—this groundbreaking show illustrates how design philosophies and practices have changed from the post-Second World War period until now.

Hong Kong. On view through February 5, 2017.

Thursday 

The Federation of Industries Building, Baghdad.

Every Building in Baghdad: The Rifat Chadirji Archives at the Arab Image Foundation

This exhibition examines the work of Iraqi architect Rifat Chadirji through the collection of his original photographs and building documents held at the Arab Image Foundation in Beirut. With the work of his architectural office, Iraq Consult, and in his other professional and intellectual roles, Chadirji became a pivotal cultural figure in Baghdad during the period of its postwar modernization from the 1950s through the 1970s.

Chicago, IL. On view through December 31, 2016.

Friday

Constructing Play: Classic + Modern Building Toys

An exciting exploration of the development of children’s toys over the past 175+ years. Travel back in time to learn how different building toys were invented, designed, and branded to become the toys that still secretly educate children today! Appropriate for all ages.

Philadelphia, PA. On view through January 26, 2017.

Saturday/Sunday

Invasions

A photography exhibit accompanied by a site-specific installation, featuring work by artist, Charles Pétillon. Pétillon is known for his white balloon installations and resulting photography, which is a testimony of something that does not exist anymore. 

Paris, France. On view through January 14, 2017.

Check out the Core77 Calendar for more design world events, competitions and exhibitions, or submit your own to be considered for our next Week in Design.


Core77

Pick 5 Ultimate Gift Guide: Week 4 Winners

The last week of our Ultimate Gift Guide competition is finally here! We’re closing our weekly wins competition with a bang: today, four winners are taking home candles from Keap, the sustainably concerned candle company based in Brooklyn (also whose co-founder Stephen Tracy created his own awesome list for us this year).

Keap candles

Make your own Ultimate Gift Guide here by 11:59 PM EST tonight (December 9th)

Here is our last round of weekly winners before we announce the Monday the winners of the big enchilada prizes….

Aaron Tuck’s artisan home baker guide offers up some quality and inexpensive tools for making your own bread at home! Because we can’t just be designing 24 hours of the day 7 days a week… 

Christopher Hanks taps into the current craving for 80’s nostalgia in pop culture with his “For the 80’s Kids Who Never Grew Up” list, and we couldn’t be happier to see it within the gift guides. For kids today or even adults who act like kids, a Rubik’s cube or NES Classic are the perfect go-to gifts!

Find some great design-friendly objects for your holiday party via J Rosen’s cocktail-centric “Drink Up” gift guide. We’re partial to the Matterhorn glasses that bring an interesting twist to your traditional whiskey glass. 

Submitted a couple weeks ago, this gift guide by Graeme Reid supports the local by sourcing gifts direct out of Glasgow. All of the items in this list are persuading us to take a trip to check out all the great design in Scotland….

A special thanks to all the winners above and other Core77-ers out there who have helped us find some great and unexpected gifts for the holidays! 

Remember—you still have a few hours to submit! Send in your gift guide by 11:59 PM TONIGHT (December 9th) and you could be in the running to win an Amazon Echo or GoPro! 

Make your own Ultimate Gift Guide here


Core77

Pick 5 Ultimate Gift Guide: Week 4 Winners

The last week of our Ultimate Gift Guide competition is finally here! We’re closing our weekly wins competition with a bang: today, four winners are taking home candles from Keap, the sustainably concerned candle company based in Brooklyn (also whose co-founder Stephen Tracy created his own awesome list for us this year).

Keap candles

Make your own Ultimate Gift Guide here by 11:59 PM EST tonight (December 9th)

Here is our last round of weekly winners before we announce the Monday the winners of the big enchilada prizes….

Aaron Tuck’s artisan home baker guide offers up some quality and inexpensive tools for making your own bread at home! Because we can’t just be designing 24 hours of the day 7 days a week… 

Christopher Hanks taps into the current craving for 80’s nostalgia in pop culture with his “For the 80’s Kids Who Never Grew Up” list, and we couldn’t be happier to see it within the gift guides. For kids today or even adults who act like kids, a Rubik’s cube or NES Classic are the perfect go-to gifts!

Find some great design-friendly objects for your holiday party via J Rosen’s cocktail-centric “Drink Up” gift guide. We’re partial to the Matterhorn glasses that bring an interesting twist to your traditional whiskey glass. 

Submitted a couple weeks ago, this gift guide by Graeme Reid supports the local by sourcing gifts direct out of Glasgow. All of the items in this list are persuading us to take a trip to check out all the great design in Scotland….

A special thanks to all the winners above and other Core77-ers out there who have helped us find some great and unexpected gifts for the holidays! 

Remember—you still have a few hours to submit! Send in your gift guide by 11:59 PM TONIGHT (December 9th) and you could be in the running to win an Amazon Echo or GoPro! 

Make your own Ultimate Gift Guide here


Core77