Tag Archives: visual

Design Job: Make a Visual Impact! Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) is Seeking a Director of Design in Providence, RI

RISD is seeking a Director of Design to convey the collective imagination of the college community through integrated print and digital communications that engage and inform diverse audiences, including prospective and current students, donors, faculty members, alumni and the general public. The director, who reports to the Chief Marketing

View the full design job here
Core77

See How Visual Engineer Steve Giralt Rigs Up Another Tricky Shoot

Steve Giralt is the engineer/photographer who rigged up that elaborating “self-assembling burger” video shoot. Now he’s back with an equally tricky project, shooting “United Not Divided,” a PSA that hopes to calm the political divisiveness America’s currently experiencing. 

Here’s the finished product:

And here’s the behind-the-scenes showing how he pulled it off:

Behind The Scenes #UnitedNotDivided from United Not Divided America on Vimeo.

Does Giralt have a killer gig or what?

Sadly, America is being roiled by yet another rift: On this weekend’s Saturday Night Live, comedian Aziz Ansari compared President Trump to Chris Brown, prompting Brown to go after Ansari on Twitter.

Oh, America.

In more uplifting news, here’s a video of 1,000 Kentucky high school students singing the national anthem in an acoustically-pleasing hotel atrium:


Core77

See How Visual Engineer Steve Giralt Rigs Up Another Tricky Shoot

Steve Giralt is the engineer/photographer who rigged up that elaborating “self-assembling burger” video shoot. Now he’s back with an equally tricky project, shooting “United Not Divided,” a PSA that hopes to calm the political divisiveness America’s currently experiencing. 

Here’s the finished product:

And here’s the behind-the-scenes showing how he pulled it off:

Behind The Scenes #UnitedNotDivided from United Not Divided America on Vimeo.

Does Giralt have a killer gig or what?

Sadly, America is being roiled by yet another rift: On this weekend’s Saturday Night Live, comedian Aziz Ansari compared President Trump to Chris Brown, prompting Brown to go after Ansari on Twitter.

Oh, America.

In more uplifting news, here’s a video of 1,000 Kentucky high school students singing the national anthem in an acoustically-pleasing hotel atrium:


Core77

Moscow vs New York: Visual Comparison Of Two Big Cities 45 Years Ago

1969, Soviet Moscow and New York City. Two big totally different cities, two cultures, two nations. We have found some photos of the old cities and tried to compare them. Just have a look at pictures below and find out what came out of it.

Moscow on the left; New York City on the right.

































Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

See How Visual Engineer Steve Giralt Rigs Up Another Tricky Shoot

Steve Giralt is the engineer/photographer who rigged up that elaborating “self-assembling burger” video shoot. Now he’s back with an equally tricky project, shooting “United Not Divided,” a PSA that hopes to calm the political divisiveness America’s currently experiencing. 

Here’s the finished product:

And here’s the behind-the-scenes showing how he pulled it off:

Behind The Scenes #UnitedNotDivided from United Not Divided America on Vimeo.

Does Giralt have a killer gig or what?

Sadly, America is being roiled by yet another rift: On this weekend’s Saturday Night Live, comedian Aziz Ansari compared President Trump to Chris Brown, prompting Brown to go after Ansari on Twitter.

Oh, America.

In more uplifting news, here’s a video of 1,000 Kentucky high school students singing the national anthem in an acoustically-pleasing hotel atrium:


Core77

Moscow vs New York: Visual Comparison Of Two Big Cities 45 Years Ago

1969, Soviet Moscow and New York City. Two big totally different cities, two cultures, two nations. We have found some photos of the old cities and tried to compare them. Just have a look at pictures below and find out what came out of it.

Moscow on the left; New York City on the right.

































Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Self-Assembling Burger Hack: Visual Engineer Rigs Up Elaborate Device to Shoot This Commercial

Steve Giralt isn’t just a photographer; the dude is a Visual Engineer, according to his bio, and as you’ll see below the title looks well-earned. Check out the crazy automated rig that he built in order to shoot this video of floating hamburger ingredients magically falling into place:

Deconstructed Burger Behind The Scenes from Steve Giralt on Vimeo.

If you live in New York and shoot, by the way, Giralt is the founder of the Image Makers Club, an “open-source creative exploration community in NYC.” They meet up monthly over beers to share ideas and help each other solve problems. Here’s Giralt explaining what they do in more detail:


Core77

Self-Assembling Burger Hack: Visual Engineer Rigs Up Elaborate Device to Shoot This Commercial

Steve Giralt isn’t just a photographer; the dude is a Visual Engineer, according to his bio, and as you’ll see below the title looks well-earned. Check out the crazy automated rig that he built in order to shoot this video of floating hamburger ingredients magically falling into place:

Deconstructed Burger Behind The Scenes from Steve Giralt on Vimeo.

If you live in New York and shoot, by the way, Giralt is the founder of the Image Makers Club, an “open-source creative exploration community in NYC.” They meet up monthly over beers to share ideas and help each other solve problems. Here’s Giralt explaining what they do in more detail:


Core77

Design Job: Travel in Style as TEAGUE’s Visual Designer in Seattle, WA

The Visual Designer is responsible for applying his/her conceptual skills and imagination to bring innovation and creative excellence to TEAGUE’s design solutions. This position requires a solid graphic design foundation, interactive and/or motion design skills, and experience working alongside Interaction and Industrial Designers to produce final concept designs.

View the full design job here
Core77

Humorous Illustrations Of Chewbacca As Comical Visual Puns

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London-based designer and illustrator Joe Stone is back with a follow-up project. Titled ‘Drewbacca’, this new series follows the theme of his ‘Drawntroopers’ project. With some humorous wordplay and visual puns, he imagines ‘Chewie’ from Star Wars as ‘Queuebacca’ (waiting in line), ‘Loobacca’ (sitting on the loo), ‘Stewbecca’ (cooking a stew), and more.

h/t: designtaxi

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

With Visual Puzzles and Funky Still Lifes, “Alphabetacool” Is a Children’s Book for Adults (Too)

Adi Goodrich and Sean Pecknold are two parts of the Los Angeles based Sing Sing Studio. They’re prolific and immensely talented visual artists, and they’ve come together, through an obsession with children’s books and a belief that kids are smarter than us, to make a children’s book of their own.

We’re very excited to have their book, Alphabetacool, and I sent them a few questions so we could get a little more insight into this incredibly fun book they’ve made—one that’s more intellectual and uniquely visual than any kids book we’ve recently seen. Also, it’s good for us adults too…

HES: You two have a huge catalogue of diverse work, and now you’re making this step into books. Has this been something you’ve always been interested in? Or is it something you sort of happened upon amidst other work?

ADI: I’ve been obsessed with children’s books since I was in college, and would spend most of my research time in the Harold Washington Children’s library looking like a total creep and loving the design of children’s books from the 60’s-70’s. I’ve always wanted to make a children’s book, but never thought I could until Sean pushed this project for our studio. 

SEAN: I’ve always loved kid’s books. Maurice Sendak, Roald Dahl, Dr. Seuss, Richard Scarry; they made such cool worlds in their books. When I was first getting into animation a few years ago, I would look at some of those books for inspiration. Adi and I had been taking photos together for a couple months, and this seemed like the perfect place to start making kid’s books. 

HES: We’ve been talking a lot about the intellectual side of the book. It really does seem like it will force, especially young readers, to make some significant linguistic and visual connections—beyond what a lot of children’s books do. Was this something you went at with intention, as a goal for the book? And how did you cultivate that theme throughout?

SEAN: We wanted the book to appeal to both kids and our friends, and wanted to make some fun and weird still-life photos, so we didn’t restrict ourselves too much to reach a specific age range or learning level. And our collaboration with Jeremiah Chiu on the typography puzzles was also very open, we gave him a lot of freedom to explore and have fun designing the hints for each page. It’s been fun to read the book with kids and see what they notice. I think a good kid’s book is one that you come back to and get different things from at different ages, so if there is a little joke or something in there, that a 3 year old won’t get at first, maybe she will when she’s 8.

HES: What came first, the object or the word? What I mean is: what was the selection process like for the words to include? 

ADI: We were in New York for the fall making photos as our studio practice out there. I was frustrated at making photos of random objects—I thought it was a waste of my time. But, basically that’s what we decided to do. One evening, we went on a walk and I cried a little bit about how I was feeling unmotivated and that I was wasting my time in the studio. (This was one of many creative meltdowns I’m sure everyone has) Sean looked at me very confidently and said, “O.K., we are going to make a children’s book. We’ll do it with random objects we find around the studio, outside and in grocery stores around the neighborhood. We’re going to make 26 of them. It’s going to be an alphabet book.”  

HES: You work a lot in video, photo, and animation. What was a challenge (or an expected reward) of the bookmaking process that you hadn’t discovered in other work you’d done?

ADI: This was our first photo project together, so one of the challenges was with the equipment—we had just bought a lighting kit—so that was definitely a challenge. I have personally styled so many still life photographs, so that was pretty easy, but the hardest part of the project was getting it printed. Printed within time, budget and the quality we wanted. Our dream is to have it be published by a publisher we respect and who sees the importance of the book. If we could make this a hardcover book, we’d be so happy!

SEAN: I’m primarily an animator and filmmaker so everything I’ve worked on has been on a screen, which is great, but it was amazing to make something together that ended up in people’s hands. The printing for the first-time-ever was challenging. Getting the PDF correctly formatted, and submitted with the correct bleed in time with the right cover and paper, there’s so much that goes into it! Luckily our studio-mate Jeremiah has done it a million times, and was able to help us out a lot.

HES: More books in the works?

SEAN: For sure, we are hoping to make at least one book a year. It’s great working with Adi because we are always talking about new ideas together, and give each other energy to make those ideas real. I’d love to do a multi-plane book, even with a simple story. We are striving to make visual work, both still and moving that rewards kids and adults alike, the possibilities are endless!

Grab Alphabetacool here

Interview conducted by Jeff Rutherford, originally for Hand-Eye Supply


Core77

Meet Your Jury Captains for Strategy & Research, Design Education Initiatives and Visual Communications

With just under a month left before the Final Deadline of the 2016 Core77 Design Awards hits, it’s time to consider the greater value of participating in this annual celebration of design excellence. Your work has the potential to influence and inspire others on a much larger scale and contribute to a global conversation about the future of design, especially if our independent and internationally distributed jury teams are impressed and decide to honor it.    

Give some thought to what your entry could mean to the broader design community and get to know the esteemed leaders of this year’s jury. In Part 3 of our interview series, we’re introducing the Jury Captains of the Strategy & Research, Design Education Initiatives and Visual Communication categories. Make sure to check out Part 1 and Part 2 as well, and don’t miss the March 23 Late Deadline!

Malin Oreback – 2016 Strategy & Research Jury Captain

Director of Design Strategy, Veryday

Malin is leading the Veryday creative team with a focus on service business and customer experience. She is coaching the design and innovation teams to challenge customers and deliver world class, innovative and meaningful service and customer experience solutions. Malin is responsible for building and supporting multidisciplinary teams to leverage the power of a people driven, engaging, innovation approach for solutions that are meaningful to people and that really make a difference to individuals, environment, society and business.

You’ve described your firm’s collaborative ideation process as “wheelchair rugby,” can you tell us more about this?

We work very collaboratively on our projects, often bringing in and engaging stakeholders from many different parts of our clients’ business, or even outside experts. When driving innovation processes in multidisciplinary teams it is key to recognize each individual’s unique competence, but also their history. All players bring their own skills and are handpicked to the team for a reason. We often have very different backgrounds and frames of reference; design, technology, management, business development, marketing and science to name a few. Facilitating this kind of collaboration requires a deep understanding of where people come from in terms of thought-models. As designers we are often hybrids, but just like everyone else we also have world views that are limited to our experiences.

I started using this metaphor after watching wheelchair rugby in the 2012 Paralympics. I saw amazing power and radiant personalities in a seemingly chaotic game, but with clear rules of engagement and focus. I feel this very much resembles our multidisciplinary work. It may seem chaotic at times to get very different people to work together, but the whole point is to create magic out of people’s differences.

You worked as an industrial designer before focusing on design direction and management, what led you to that?

As a young designer I was engaged in a couple of pretty large projects that for various reasons did not make it to market. Many of my nights and weekends had gone into those projects. I was deeply frustrated with my inability to influence the decisions made inside our client organizations. Eventually I realized I needed to understand the mechanisms behind business decisions in order to become a better designer. What difference will a great idea make for people if it ends up in a drawer?

How has the impact of research and strategy on design development changed in recent years?

Design research has become an established capability that the successful companies of the world have come to recognize as a strategic asset. Today the conversation is more about how to build lean processes that still deliver the richness of insights needed for innovation. Basically, how to get there fast and smart. We don’t often need to argue about why design strategy and research is important anymore.

What is the most pressing topic in need of design research today?

I would like to see more companies and governments turn to designers to help find solutions to some of the critical challenges the world faces today; like environmental issues, crime, education, food waste, refugee crises and more. I don’t mean to naively claim that designers are world saviors, I just think designers are a hugely untapped source of creativity when it comes to interpreting human behavior and shaping the ecosystems of tomorrow. I hope to get to review great contributions in this area.

Pradayumna Vyas – 2016 Design Education Initiatives Jury Captain

Director, National Institute of Design

Pradyumna Vyas acquired a Masters in Industrial Design from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay. In June 2010, Vyas was conferred with an honorary Master of Arts degree from the University for the Creative Arts in Farnham, United Kingdom in recognition of his contributions to design education and design promotion. Vyas has more than 30 years of professional and teaching experience in different spheres of design. In the last 25 years, he has been associated with the National Institute of Design (NID) as a faculty in the Industrial Design discipline.

What are some of the most urgent challenges facing design education?

Systems thinking is most crucial where one needs to understand the eco-system of the society, culture and tradition. There is fast-growing technological development and virtual reality, reducing people to people interaction. Human values and ecological sustenance is taking a back seat, which has to be strengthened in design education and an inclusive approach has to be encouraged.

In these evolving times, what new skills or traits must designers adopt?

Technology is overshadowing the situation. Design should be contextual. Use of technology should only be an enabler to address the issues in the context. We need to nurture interdependency for inclusive development. Inclusive development will result in a more harmonious society. We need to create a future that works for one and all.

What is holistic learning and what types of benefits does it bring to design students?

An interdisciplinary approach and co-creation with stakeholders keeps the diverse socio-economic and cultural backgrounds in mind. Holistic learning that offers a new model which goes hand-in-hand with economic development as well as environmental sustainability will give an edge to students for handling the complex future.

Mackey Saturday – 2016 Visual Communication Jury Captain

Principal, Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv

What are some guiding principles to designing branding that stands out in an information saturated age?

Regardless of the era, amount of information, or any other variables really, there are a few principles that stand true. Simplicity in form will always be effective. The necessity for something to be easily replicable is always an advantage for identity design. Distinctiveness is a must for helping an idea stick in the mind and quickly become that pleasurable point of recognition. Lastly, appropriateness should always be evaluated as it really can make or break any concept. Aesthetics often are over valued, and though the are very important, if not paired with the correct concept, they can actually hinder a design.

How has the role of communication designers evolved since you started in the field? 

The most obvious area is the development of digital platforms. Mobile is ever growing and it has been amazing to watch how that platform has become a litmus test of kinds for good communication design work. The limitations from screen size to the requirements of app icons have forced designers to reduce and focus their work, and thus has produced some very effective and compelling solutions. The role of the designer as we continue to create these new platforms is ever transforming and multiplying. The most staggering evolution I’ve observed is the necessary growth of the industry as a whole. Communication designers are needed in such a different capacity now, it’s really amazing to think of how integrated we’ll be into every part of business in the next decade or so.

What should designers pay attention to in work and in life to be the most effective in their practice? 

This is a very interesting and personal question. I assume for everyone this will be different as we all find value in, and thrive off, different conditions. For me it’s an effective balance of observing the smaller things in every moment mixed with intentionally putting myself in awe inspiring situations. In work I strive to soak in what people seem to gravitate toward consistently, what sticks out to them immediately, and what quickly transforms their opinions. I look at these experiences and observations just like any other tool and rely on them when I have problems to solve, so balance is very important in assuring I’m as well prepared as possible to develop these solutions.

Impress the 2016 Core77 Design Awards juries by entering your best work by March 23rd when Late pricing ends. The final deadline to enter is April 6th. Don’t miss it! 


Core77

Combining Holograms with Visual Presentation Technique from 1892 Yields Stunning Film Trick

In the late 19th Century, French inventor Charles-Émile Reynaud developed a way to project primitive moving images onto a painted background scene. He called his invention the Théâtre Optique (Optical Theater) and began wowing Parisian crowds with it in 1892.

Here in 2016, film director and visual artist Jeff Desom is taking a page out of Reynaud’s book—and going 3D with it. Desom has modelmaker Oli Pesch create miniature sets, into which Desom projects carefully-rotoscoped holograms to create these:

HOLORAMA: An Optical Theatre from Jeff Desom on Vimeo.

Desom calls the resultant presentation The Holorama.

For those interested in the influence Desom cites, here’s a video of Walt Disney himself explaining and demonstrating Reynaud’s invention:


Core77

Creative liberation to luxurious visual experience: NIHILITY

Posted in Fashion / Fashion blog / Fashion photo shoots / Fashion pictures

In a world where everything is a copy of a copy of a copy (times infinity) it’s easier and easier for all things art to loose their essence, to bear no relevance and hide no meaning, just like it’s somehow expected for their message to be lost way before reaching its audience.

“Through the use of experimentation as a method of free and unshackled creation and transformation of the image”, photographer Daniela Alves strives to fight the dull, conventional, pristine representation of reality by setting grounds for a continuous experimental process known to her public as project “NIHILITY”.

And the beauty of “NIHILITY” lies in its unchained spirit, in its creative freedom, in its exploratory nature that makes for a luxurious visual experience that uses fashion as a means to serve its conception.

nihility daniela alves

Article continues. To read it in full visit ‘Creative liberation to luxurious visual experience: NIHILITY‘ at Fashionising.com »

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Tagged: Catia Pereira Daniela Alves Francisca Sobral Ricardo Andrez

Fashionising.com

Popular Brand Logos Recreated with American and Chinese Bills by Visual Artist Dai Dai Tran

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Dai Dai Tran is visual artist based in Paris.

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He uses American and Chinese bills to create paper artwork. He revisits logos of famous brand, like Supreme or Apple. He gathers two currencies to show the fact that many firms have their HQ in United States and produced their products in China.

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.