Tag Archives: video

Stunning Concept Art From The Video Game The Witcher 3 By CD Projekt Red

Established in 2002, located in Warsaw and Kraków, Poland, CD PROJEKT RED was born out of raw passion to video games. The studio’s founders: Michał Kiciński and Marcin Iwiński, both pioneers in video game distribution in Poland in the 90s, decided to employ their gaming industry experience in video game development. Hence, in 2007, The Witcher was born.

More info: The Witcher 3 (h/t: candb)

The game tells the story of Geralt of Rivia, who is a Witcher – a genetically enhanced human with special powers trained to slay monsters. The Witcher contains three different paths, which affect the game’s storyline. These paths are: alliance with the Scoia’tael (also called the Squirrels), a guerrilla freedom-fighting group of Elves and other non-humans; alliance with the Order of the Flaming Rose, whose knights protect the country of Temeria; or alliance with neither group to maintain ‘Witcher neutrality.’

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt concludes the story of the witcher Geralt of Rivia, whose story to date has been covered in the previous titles. Continuing from The Witcher 2, Geralt seeks to move on with his own life, embarking on a new and personal mission while the world order itself is coming to a change.























Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Stunning Concept Art From The Video Game The Witcher 3 By CD Projekt Red

Established in 2002, located in Warsaw and Kraków, Poland, CD PROJEKT RED was born out of raw passion to video games. The studio’s founders: Michał Kiciński and Marcin Iwiński, both pioneers in video game distribution in Poland in the 90s, decided to employ their gaming industry experience in video game development. Hence, in 2007, The Witcher was born.

More info: The Witcher 3 (h/t: candb)

The game tells the story of Geralt of Rivia, who is a Witcher – a genetically enhanced human with special powers trained to slay monsters. The Witcher contains three different paths, which affect the game’s storyline. These paths are: alliance with the Scoia’tael (also called the Squirrels), a guerrilla freedom-fighting group of Elves and other non-humans; alliance with the Order of the Flaming Rose, whose knights protect the country of Temeria; or alliance with neither group to maintain ‘Witcher neutrality.’

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt concludes the story of the witcher Geralt of Rivia, whose story to date has been covered in the previous titles. Continuing from The Witcher 2, Geralt seeks to move on with his own life, embarking on a new and personal mission while the world order itself is coming to a change.























Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Stunning Concept Art From The Video Game The Witcher 3 By CD Projekt Red

Established in 2002, located in Warsaw and Kraków, Poland, CD PROJEKT RED was born out of raw passion to video games. The studio’s founders: Michał Kiciński and Marcin Iwiński, both pioneers in video game distribution in Poland in the 90s, decided to employ their gaming industry experience in video game development. Hence, in 2007, The Witcher was born.

More info: The Witcher 3 (h/t: candb)

The game tells the story of Geralt of Rivia, who is a Witcher – a genetically enhanced human with special powers trained to slay monsters. The Witcher contains three different paths, which affect the game’s storyline. These paths are: alliance with the Scoia’tael (also called the Squirrels), a guerrilla freedom-fighting group of Elves and other non-humans; alliance with the Order of the Flaming Rose, whose knights protect the country of Temeria; or alliance with neither group to maintain ‘Witcher neutrality.’

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt concludes the story of the witcher Geralt of Rivia, whose story to date has been covered in the previous titles. Continuing from The Witcher 2, Geralt seeks to move on with his own life, embarking on a new and personal mission while the world order itself is coming to a change.























Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Leaked Video of the New Ford Bronco | Autoblog Minute

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We have leaked footage of the highly anticipated Ford Bronco. This is a first look at the return of an SUV icon. What an amazing way to kick off April!

Continue reading Leaked Video of the New Ford Bronco | Autoblog Minute

Leaked Video of the New Ford Bronco | Autoblog Minute originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 31 Mar 2017 22:49:25 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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In push for more live video, Twitter officially announces the Producer API

 Confirming earlier reports by The Information and here at TechCrunch, Twitter officially announced the launch of a new tool for live video aimed larger media publishers and broadcasters. The Producer API, as it’s called, will allow professional publishers to connect their equipment  to Twitter in order to stream live video directly to its network. Twitter had previously launched… Read More


TechCrunch

Check Out OK Go’s Spectacularly Chaotic 4.2-Second Music Video

Happy Thanksgiving! Turn the parade off for a second and feast your eyes on this spectacle: OK Go’s “The One Moment,” which manages to wring a complete music video around roughly four seconds of meticulously choreographed chaos:

In the making-of video below, we see the crazy amount of planning that went into this, and also learn that no functional guitars were harmed during filming:

The video was funded by Morton Salt to promote their philanthropic “Walk Her Walk” initiative. Next Tuesday the 29th, they’re participating in the #GivingTuesday movement, which urges consumers–after the shop-a-thons of Black Friday and Cyber Monday–to “raise money for local nonprofits, schools and arts organizations; run food and clothing drives; teach children about philanthropy; encourage acts of kindness; collaborate with their neighbors; and celebrate generosity.” You can learn more here.


Core77

Sketch Video Explaining the Design Inspiration of Polk’s Signature Series

This December, Polk Audio rolls out their Signature Series of speakers, aiming to “bring the big surround sound theater and music experience into the comfort of your living room.” Core77 sketchmaster Michael DiTullo, who happens to be Sound United’s Chief Design Officer, put together this behind-the-scenes sketch video explaining the Signature line’s design inspiration:


Core77

Sketch Video Explaining the Design Inspiration of Polk’s Signature Series

This December, Polk Audio rolls out their Signature Series of speakers, aiming to “bring the big surround sound theater and music experience into the comfort of your living room.” Core77 sketchmaster Michael DiTullo, who happens to be Sound United’s Chief Design Officer, put together this behind-the-scenes sketch video explaining the Signature line’s design inspiration:


Core77

How to Use Video to License Your Ideas for New Products

Lights, camera, action! It’s time for you to become a director. Don’t sweat it — it’s not that hard.

If your sell sheet is worth a thousand words, your video sell sheet is priceless. Like I wrote about at length here, I recommend using sell sheets to pitch potential licensees on your ideas for new products. Sell sheets are like magazine ads: Concise and compelling. The benefit of your idea should be immediately apparent. But sell sheets don’t always work. At the end of the day, they’re static, and may not leave an emotional impact. If the sell sheet you create isn’t doing its job — meaning you haven’t been able to motivate potential licensees to get back to you about your idea — you may need to create a video to supplement it.

Video can truly make all the difference. As we all know, it increasingly dominates our newsfeeds. And for good reason: It’s a powerful medium we can’t take our eyes off of. It also satisfies our collective laziness. Watching is about as passive as it gets. Videos are what go viral, after all. In other words, video is a game-changer. And I mean that quite literally. Product designers frequently tell me: I didn’t understand why potential licensees weren’t getting back to me about my concept, which is great! So I created a video. And they got back to me immediately to ask me for more information. About ninety percent of the concepts I help negotiate licensing agreements for these days employ the use of video.

When Ryan Diez, a former student of mine who is now an inventRight coach, invented a unique dog-washing device, he labored for years trying to bring it to market. He always got great feedback, and even licensed the idea in 2009, but progress ultimately stalled and he kept hearing no. Then, in June of last year, a video of his hoop-shaped product the Woof Washer 360 blew up on Facebook overnight. The video had been uploaded almost accidentally. It wasn’t the infomercial that had been airing during the past few weeks, but B-roll, shorter, and soundless. The next morning, the clip had already been viewed nearly a million times, Diez told me. And from there, it took off. It was played more than 60 million times on social media and written about internationally.

I remember the first time I saw the video. 360 degrees of clean in less than 1 minute! I’ve had many dogs over the years. I know how much fun bathing them is — and that it always takes longer than a minute. So I was intrigued. It was a great video.

As a result, he was able to license the Woof Washer 360 to the largest As Seen On TV company. You can buy it today in Walmart, Target, and every pet store around the country. Just last week, it was featured on Good Morning America and Rachael Ray’s show. Tellingly, the final commercial that was made doesn’t differ much from the video originally uploaded to Facebook.

The take-away? A short commercial of your product can be incredibly impactful.

Top Considerations to Keep in Mind

ONE MINUTE VIDEO – Your video sell sheet should be about a minute long. It could be even shorter, but I’d hesitate to go longer. If you can’t convey the benefit of your concept succinctly, you haven’t really keyed in on it — or maybe there isn’t one. Focus on hooking viewers quickly.

PROBLEM SOLVING – If your concept solves a problem, devote the opening portion of your video to that problem. Make it painful. Make it relatable. After something like 15 seconds, focus on the solution, aka your product. I’ve seen some videos that are in black and white at first. Then, when the product is shown solving said annoyance, color blooms across the screen. Everyone’s smiling and happy. Life’s great!

GET EMOTIONAL – There are so many different ways you can film your video sell sheet. This is absolutely an opportunity to harness your creativity as a designer and a developer. What matters? Connecting with viewers on an emotional level. You need to give people the solution they’ve been looking for. It’s not about how sleek your video looks. You need to capture the magic, your wow factor. And you can use your iPhone to do it.

Gripgo Car Mount

One of the best video sell sheets I’ve ever seen was made by my student Scott Baumann for his product Gripgo, a car phone mount, which became an As Seen On TV hit. Baumann is a professional designer who has licensed the rights to more than 40 products since he began pitching potential licensees about eight years ago. Back in the day, he would shoot on mini-DV, import the video, edit it, render it again and again and again, and then finally burn it to DVD and send a physical copy in the mail.

“Many of my concepts tend to be simple creative twists that, in my mind, offer a better solution to a perceived common problem. There’s no better way to illustrate the unique performance and attributes of new product concepts than through the use of video.” Video has been a driving force behind his success, he said. And although he admits producing creative and engaging video content fits naturally within his skill set, he thinks anyone today who has an iPhone, iMovie, and is a little bit creative can produce a “more than sufficient video demonstration of their idea.” I wholeheartedly agree.

The video he created for Gripgo features a particularly thrilling moment: As Baumann drives down the street, he unsticks the Gripgo mounted to his dashboard and says, “This is my new iPhone 4.” He then thrusts the unit (which his phone is attached to) out of the window and vigorously shakes it. The phone stays put! Talk about a wow moment. The benefit of Gripgo is explicitly clear: Your phone isn’t going anywhere.

That video is a good example of just how important it is to understand and speak the language of the channel you’re presenting to, Baumann explained. “Products that have a magical quality to them and that may, or may not, have a better or different way of facilitating a need — those kinds of products tend to fit well within the As Seen On TV format. You want to present your concept in a language and format they understand. It worked!”

Baumann put it another way: When it comes to product marketing videos, there really are no rules. Every concept has its own unique features and functions. His advice? “Show what those are in the most clear, concise, and creative fashion you can think of — that’s it,” he said. “We’ve all seen cheesy “As Seen On TV” commercials. But as cheesy as those are, there’s a bit of science to them as well.”

The commercial that was ultimately made to sell Gripgo is quite similar to Baumann’s original concept as well.

Tools You Need

PROTOTYPE – You don’t need a perfect looks-like works-like prototype — far from it. From the right angle, crude prototypes look great on camera. Create different prototypes to meet your needs. Your prototype needs to work right once, or even not at all: You can piece together different clips and prototypes to give the impression that it does. Editing is your friend.

RECORDING DEVICE – A recording device, like your iPhone or a GoPro.

TRIPOD – Your hands will never be as steady.

LIGHTING – A small lighting kit or great natural light. I would always rather shoot in natural light, because it’s soft. But that’s not always possible. Does your video need to be perfectly lit? No, but it helps. I bought a $ 120 kit for my YouTube channel.

MICROPHONE – Bad audio is irritating and distracting. Some cameras have great built-in microphones.

Techniques and Tips

Stage your video appropriately. If your product is used in the kitchen, film your video in the kitchen. If it’s a garden product, film it outside in a backyard. Look the part. You get the idea.

Map out a storyboard and/or script first. Like I said, there are an endless amount of ways you can put your video together. Many of them do follow a familiar format, though. I recommend watching the videos on Allstar Product Group’s website to get a sense of what that format is. That said, what’s unique and powerful about ideas obviously differs. Remember what your intention is: To entice a potential licensee to ask you for more information.

For example, consider the video Baumann created for Lite-Brite Touch, a new toy concept. Baumann has had notable success licensing his toy ideas to companies like Fat Brain. There isn’t one word in the entire video, he pointed out. “I’ve found it’s best to let the toy speak for itself. Show what it does in the most creative fashion you can, lay an appropriate soundtrack behind it, and get out of the way.”

The video worked: That’s what he sent to Hasbro, he said, and they got back to him.

Test for lighting and audio quality. Take shots from different angles, including close-up and at a distance. Watch them on your computer. (On your phone, they may not look crisp enough.) Which angles make your product look best? Experiment. You want to come away with more than enough footage to work with, so take a variety of shots. Play around. I’ve watched dozens of videos on YouTube about product angles. It’s not as if you’re reinventing the wheel here.

Always film horizontally. That’s how video is viewed.

Consider hiring a professional to do a voice-over. You don’t have to appear on camera if you don’t want to, and you shouldn’t if you appear uncomfortable. Voiceover specialists are very affordable — like $ 5 to $ 10. It’ll leave a great, professional impression.

As far as editing is concerned, there are helpful tutorials on YouTube as well as Lynda.com. Most of my students hire a freelancer to help them. This is a good time to reiterate that whenever you hire someone to help you, make sure to have that individual sign a non-disclosure agreement that includes work-for-hire language. If there are any improvements to your concept made, you need to own them.

When you include a link to your video on your sell sheet, make sure it stands out. You want people to click on it, after all!

Whether you use YouTube, Vimeo, or another service provider, password-protect your video. (If you don’t, your video could constitute public disclosure, which threatens your patent rights.) The analytics these sites provide will be useful to you. Baumann is a big fan of Vimeo in particular. “There are other providers out there, but Vimeo gives me everything I need and more to deploy my presentations in a highly secure manner.”

One of his top tips: “Don’t upload just one video and send that same link to all of the companies you want to present it to. Upload a separate video and corresponding password for every company instead. That way, you can track each company’s engagement via the analytics provided for each individual video. As a result, you know exactly who watched it, when, and how many times. What better way to gauge their level of interest?”

I think this strategy is absolutely brilliant. The party with the most information always wins, especially when it comes to negotiating.

Designs that are initially rejected after being pitched using solely a 2D sell sheet end up being licensed with video. I hear about it all the time — video really is that powerful.


Core77

Slow-Mo Video of a Ladybug Unfolding Its Hidden Wings and Taking Off

By Clinton & Charles Robertson from Del Rio, Texas & College Station, TX, USA – Ladybird Beetle Taking Flight, CC BY-SA 2.0

If there’s anything on this earth that looks like it shouldn’t be able to fly, it’s a ladybug. They’ve got the same overall form factor as turtles, for chrissakes, and they look like they were designed by the people that came up with Super Mario Bros.

But ladybugs’ hard shell, or Elytra, actually has a sneaky reveal down the middle. These Elytra swing open like the doors of a freaking Lamborghini, allowing an improbably long pair of wings to unfurl from within. If you’ve never seen this in action before, have a look, it’s pretty cool:

Cool, but almost comically ungraceful. I like how when the wings come out, they initially look like they have upturned winglets on the tips.

Credit where credit is due, by the way: “The sequence was recorded by cameraman Rainer Bergomaz from Blue Paw Artists,” writes PCO, a German manufacturer of scientific cameras, “with a pco.dimax HD at 3000 frames/s and 1296 x 720 pixel resolution. The first part is displayed at 250 frames/s and when the ladybug starts to unfold its wings the display speed is reduced to 25 frames/s.”


Core77

Slow-Mo Video of a Ladybug Unfolding Its Hidden Wings and Taking Off

By Clinton & Charles Robertson from Del Rio, Texas & College Station, TX, USA – Ladybird Beetle Taking Flight, CC BY-SA 2.0

If there’s anything on this earth that looks like it shouldn’t be able to fly, it’s a ladybug. They’ve got the same overall form factor as turtles, for chrissakes, and they look like they were designed by the people that came up with Super Mario Bros.

But ladybugs’ hard shell, or Elytra, actually has a sneaky reveal down the middle. These Elytra swing open like the doors of a freaking Lamborghini, allowing an improbably long pair of wings to unfurl from within. If you’ve never seen this in action before, have a look, it’s pretty cool:

Cool, but almost comically ungraceful. I like how when the wings come out, they initially look like they have upturned winglets on the tips.

Credit where credit is due, by the way: “The sequence was recorded by cameraman Rainer Bergomaz from Blue Paw Artists,” writes PCO, a German manufacturer of scientific cameras, “with a pco.dimax HD at 3000 frames/s and 1296 x 720 pixel resolution. The first part is displayed at 250 frames/s and when the ladybug starts to unfold its wings the display speed is reduced to 25 frames/s.”


Core77

Video Interview With Unlicensed Action Figure Artist The Sucklord (NSFW Language)

Here’s a fascinating interview with The Sucklord, the NYC-based artist that cranks out modified and unlicensed action figures from his downtown studio. Whether it’s Gay Empire Homotroopers, and AT-AT that looks like it’s been through the South Bronx in the late ’70s or a Sleestak in a business suit, the Suckadelic brand is known for producing irreverent social commentary via toys that appear innocuous until you get up close.

The Sucklord, a/k/a/ Morgan Phillips, reveals that needing to pay the rent on his first studio is “what drove me to come up with a cheap way of doing mass production,” before revealing his moldmaking technique. He also talks about his trenchant philosophy on why “villains are just better:”


Core77

Video Interview With Unlicensed Action Figure Artist The Sucklord (NSFW Language)

Here’s a fascinating interview with The Sucklord, the NYC-based artist that cranks out modified and unlicensed action figures from his downtown studio. Whether it’s Gay Empire Homotroopers, and AT-AT that looks like it’s been through the South Bronx in the late ’70s or a Sleestak in a business suit, the Suckadelic brand is known for producing irreverent social commentary via toys that appear innocuous until you get up close.

The Sucklord, a/k/a/ Morgan Phillips, reveals that needing to pay the rent on his first studio is “what drove me to come up with a cheap way of doing mass production,” before revealing his moldmaking technique. He also talks about his trenchant philosophy on why “villains are just better:”


Core77

“Holy Cow” Video: Tree Spontaneously Splits and Disintegrates, Nearly Killing Logger

Wood grain is a funny thing, and most of us know that lumber contains all sorts of bound-up tension within it. On a good day, you’ll cut a board, release those waiting forces and it will warp out of shape, ruining your project. On a bad day, you’ll cut into it and the resulting forces will almost kill you, like this:

If you full-screen it, you can see the precise moment the crack develops. Talk about scary. You can see the poor guy doesn’t even know which way to run, and prudently abandoned his chainsaw.

What happened here is similar to what lumberjacks refer to as a tree pulling a “barber chair.” Here’s a more classic example:

The nickname comes from the classic barber’s chair, whereby a man is made to recline in it for a shave; if you envision the act—the legs swinging up and the torso leaning back over the pivot point of the chair’s central post—the moniker makes sense.

When a tree goes barber chair, obviously the potential lumber within it is ruined. But the more serious problem, of course, is the loss of human life. Even experienced arborists and lumberjacks have been killed by such incidents, and as you can imagine, the deaths are typically grisly.

Canadian website Arboriculture explains what causes these incidents to happen:

…A barber chair occurs when using conventional back-cuts where the hinge is formed by cutting the wood from the back of the tree towards the hinge. As the saw severs the more resilient sapwood fibres typically found in the outer rings of a tree, the more brittle heartwood must resist the bending load. In cases of heavy forward lean and in older trees, this can result in the hinge wood splitting upwards as the tree falls. When the tree top contacts the ground the section of tree that has split upwards crushes either the remaining wood column straight backwards or the split standing section tears and rolls off to either side. In either case, the best place to be is away and at an angle.

If you look hard enough, you can find videos online of graphic barber chair accidents. We won’t post them here because that’s not our bag. But if you’re an inexperienced DIY’er cutting a tree down in your backyard, please use caution, do your research, and/or consider hiring a pro.


Core77

“Holy Cow” Video: Tree Spontaneously Splits and Disintegrates, Nearly Killing Logger

Wood grain is a funny thing, and most of us know that lumber contains all sorts of bound-up tension within it. On a good day, you’ll cut a board, release those waiting forces and it will warp out of shape, ruining your project. On a bad day, you’ll cut into it and the resulting forces will almost kill you, like this:

If you full-screen it, you can see the precise moment the crack develops. Talk about scary. You can see the poor guy doesn’t even know which way to run, and prudently abandoned his chainsaw.

What happened here is similar to what lumberjacks refer to as a tree pulling a “barber chair.” Here’s a more classic example:

The nickname comes from the classic barber’s chair, whereby a man is made to recline in it for a shave; if you envision the act—the legs swinging up and the torso leaning back over the pivot point of the chair’s central post—the moniker makes sense.

When a tree goes barber chair, obviously the potential lumber within it is ruined. But the more serious problem, of course, is the loss of human life. Even experienced arborists and lumberjacks have been killed by such incidents, and as you can imagine, the deaths are typically grisly.

Canadian website Arboriculture explains what causes these incidents to happen:

…A barber chair occurs when using conventional back-cuts where the hinge is formed by cutting the wood from the back of the tree towards the hinge. As the saw severs the more resilient sapwood fibres typically found in the outer rings of a tree, the more brittle heartwood must resist the bending load. In cases of heavy forward lean and in older trees, this can result in the hinge wood splitting upwards as the tree falls. When the tree top contacts the ground the section of tree that has split upwards crushes either the remaining wood column straight backwards or the split standing section tears and rolls off to either side. In either case, the best place to be is away and at an angle.

If you look hard enough, you can find videos online of graphic barber chair accidents. We won’t post them here because that’s not our bag. But if you’re an inexperienced DIY’er cutting a tree down in your backyard, please use caution, do your research, and/or consider hiring a pro.


Core77

Video of Another Omnidirectional Wheel Design, This One a Bit Suspicious

Will parallel parking and three-point-turns one day be a thing of the past? We’ve seen Mecanum wheels, the omnidirectional wheels that allow vehicles to move sideways and rotate in place. But the fact that Airtrax has stopped producing them on their forklifts indicates they’re either not practical or not profitable.

Now another inventor has produced an omnidirectional wheel, which appears to operate on a different principle than the Mecanums. Observe:

Canada-based inventor William Liddiard calls them Liddiard Wheels, and that’s his own car that he’s added them to in the video. “Unlike other omni capable wheels, my wheels do not require the vehicle to be built around them,” Liddiard writes. “This is a world first bolt-on application for anything with wheels.” We’re not sure either of those statements are true, as Airtrax’s Mecanum wheels appeared to be retrofitted to existing forklifts.

In fact, in his description Liddiard, who’s seeking a partner to bring the invention to market, makes a lot of bold claims, without backing up a single one of them with any kind of demonstration or deeper explanation:

Designed to be used in all weather and road conditions. They are stronger, faster, and more accurately controlled than prior art [sic]. They can take a beating. The tires “can” have the same build characteristics (siping, grooves, rubber compounds etc.) as regular tires.

If all of this is true, why is there no footage of the thing driving on the highway in the rain, or plowing through potholes? And if you watch the video very closely, you’ll notice something peculiar: In the rotating scenes Liddiard, who is apparently working the controls from the passenger seat, inexplicably flickers. It appears that the video is missing frames and/or that some editing has been done.


Core77

“Framing Houses in Minnesota” Video (Funny)

Some of you are architects or designers who know this feeling: It’s your initial visit to the jobsite, and as it’s still under construction, you’re given a hardhat to wear for the very first time. And you feel a perverse little thrill, like “Ooh, I’ve got a hardhat on!”

But what about the folks who wear them all day long? Minnesota-based Carpentry Contractors Co. has released a humorous video showing you their side of the story:

“That laugh people do when they almost die….” Gold!


Core77

Michael DiTullo Featured in Definitive Technology’s BP9000 Video

As the Core77-Discussion-Boards-savvy among you know, Michael DiTullo isn’t just a moderator, but has one of the sweetest industrial design jobs around. As Chief Design Officer for Sound United, DiTullo heads up design projects for S.U. brands Polk Audio, Boom and Definitive Technology.

For the latter, DiTullo and team have recently completed the BP9000 line, the fourth generation of DT’s Bipolar speaker series and a ground-up redesign. In the following video DiTullo, the design team and the engineering team talk about what went into this massive undertaking:

We’re digging this quote: “I wanted to draw stuff from the future. I just figured that had to be somebody’s job.”


Core77