Tag Archives: Trippy

Motion Magic’s Trippy Endless GIFs

A graphic designer going by the handle Motion Magic has mastered a new art form. Neither still photograph nor video, s/he has struck upon a mesmerizing balance between the two:

“When creating this effect on still images, I take great care in the small details that help to add a more realistic feeling in the movement,” the designer writes. “It’s as if the moment captured is brought back to life with an endless mesmerizing motion effect.” 

As for how s/he does it, s/he starts with a still image and transforms it using a program called Plotagraph Pro.

You can check out more of Motion Magic’s work here and here.


Core77

Motion Magic’s Trippy Endless GIFs

A graphic designer going by the handle Motion Magic has mastered a new art form. Neither still photograph nor video, s/he has struck upon a mesmerizing balance between the two:

“When creating this effect on still images, I take great care in the small details that help to add a more realistic feeling in the movement,” the designer writes. “It’s as if the moment captured is brought back to life with an endless mesmerizing motion effect.” 

As for how s/he does it, s/he starts with a still image and transforms it using a program called Plotagraph Pro.

You can check out more of Motion Magic’s work here and here.


Core77

Motion Magic’s Trippy Endless GIFs

A graphic designer going by the handle Motion Magic has mastered a new art form. Neither still photograph nor video, s/he has struck upon a mesmerizing balance between the two:

“When creating this effect on still images, I take great care in the small details that help to add a more realistic feeling in the movement,” the designer writes. “It’s as if the moment captured is brought back to life with an endless mesmerizing motion effect.” 

As for how s/he does it, s/he starts with a still image and transforms it using a program called Plotagraph Pro.

You can check out more of Motion Magic’s work here and here.


Core77

A Matter of Perspective: Aydin Büyüktas’ Trippy, Tweaked Landscape Photography 

Remember our three-part series on space colony form factors? (Just say “yes.”) 

The prevailing wisdom is that the shape of any large-scale space colony would have to circle back on itself so that the gravity created by rotating it would maximize the usable surface area:

We can’t help but think of this while looking at the images from photographer Aydin Büyüktas‘ killer Flatland series:

How does he do it? Büyüktas sends a drone up to take aerial shots, then stitches them together digitally. See more of them here.

Via Colossal

See Also:

Space Colony Form Factors, Part 1: Bernal Spheres

Space Colony Form Factors, Part 2: O’Neill Cylinders

Space Colony Form Factors, Part 3: The Stanford Torus and Beyond


Core77

A Matter of Perspective: Aydin Büyüktas’ Trippy, Tweaked Landscape Photography 

Remember our three-part series on space colony form factors? (Just say “yes.”) 

The prevailing wisdom is that the shape of any large-scale space colony would have to circle back on itself so that the gravity created by rotating it would maximize the usable surface area:

We can’t help but think of this while looking at the images from photographer Aydin Büyüktas‘ killer Flatland series:

How does he do it? Büyüktas sends a drone up to take aerial shots, then stitches them together digitally. See more of them here.

Via Colossal

See Also:

Space Colony Form Factors, Part 1: Bernal Spheres

Space Colony Form Factors, Part 2: O’Neill Cylinders

Space Colony Form Factors, Part 3: The Stanford Torus and Beyond


Core77

These Trippy Collages Got Phillip Kremer Kicked Off Of Social Media

Endlessly entertaining, often hilarious collages of celebrities, politicians, and ordinary people are at the crux of artist Phillip Kremer’s infamy. He makes art that is as interesting as the stories behind his creations. After hosting his first art show in the bathroom of a dive bar 20 years after his final art class in high school, Kremer found new excitement in making art once again. The series of collages started from Google searches of “blank face” when Kremer couldn’t find anything.

More info: Instagram (h/t: creators)

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#mrspotatohead

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#bubbles

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#predator

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#robblerobble

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#thumb #praisebreak

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Very excited for the new @friendlyrich record coming out this Fall! #hairbear

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@realdonaldtrump #getahaircut #getarealjob

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#betsydevos #bitch

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#lanternfish

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Dentsu Lab’s Trippy “Fencing Visualization Project”

For creatives, being able to show things that aren’t really there is a huge boon. Computer graphics enable us to present nonexistent designs to clients. They allow architects to show fly-throughs, film directors to indulge fantasies, manufacturers to troubleshoot prototypes. And increasingly, they may take a role in helping us better enjoy sporting events by depicting that which our eye cannot see.

Earlier we looked into the NFL’s CG 1st-and-10 line, which had an analog in the flags and chains. But the faster-paced sport of fencing had no such equivalent, and viewers either developed eyes quick enough to follow the action or lost interest.

To combat the latter, Japanese design and technology collaborative Dentsu Lab created the Fencing Visualization Project, where they rigged Olympic fencing champion Yuki Ota and a partner up with sensor-laen foils and suits. They then created these stunning visualizations of the action:

Pretty cool, no? Those of you in the current generation don’t know how good you have it: Previously, if you wanted to see physical objects streaming light-trails like that, you had to buy mushrooms in a parking lot from some gentle but decidedly weird guy named Hal who drove one of those strange Volkswagen Rabbit pick-up truck vehicles and smelt like patchouli.

Via Rocket News


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Goodyear’s Trippy “Eagle 360″ Concept for Spherical Tires

Here’s a concept that those of you who enjoy putting flashy rims on your car won’t like. Goodyear’s “Eagle 360″ concept tire is completely spherical, precluding you from showing off LED-riddled spinners as you cruise the boulevard.

These spherical wheels would work via mag-lev (duh)…

… and the company has some interesting ideas for how they would evacuate water and eliminate the need for steering linkages. Take a look and see what you think:

Sure, they occupy far more volume than a conventional tire and pose significant technical challenges, but don’t be a negative Nellie. Instead let’s investigate the possibilities. What I’d really like to see is a provision for the wheels to be hollow and with some type of access hatch. That way you could fill one wheel with dirty laundry, some water and detergent, and by the time you arrive at your destination, boom, clean clothes!

You could also insert peeled avocadoes, limes and some type of pestle in another wheel to create a delicious guacamole as you drive.

The third wheel could be used for smoothies.

As for the fourth wheel, the obvious thing to do is fill it with a large Elide Fire Ball.


Core77

UCLA’s Trippy Augmented Reality Sandbox

Sim City fascinates millions of players who are able to manipulate urban environments to their liking. UCLA has created a kind of nature-based alternative, and one that looks more satisfying in that the user physically manipulates an actual material, sand in a sandbox. An Xbox Kinect reads the shapes you create, then a computer and projector overlay graphics updated in real-time. Take a look at this thing:

To be clear, this Augmented Reality Sandbox is meant as an educational tool, not a videogame. UCLA’s Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory in the Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences reckon they can use it for undergraduate science courses. But if they can mass-produce these, I think they’d have a potentially huge market for children—at least the children of parents who work in Silicon Valley. Would you rather your kid made mud-pies, or sculpted facsimiles of Napa Valley?

In addition to the cool “make it rain” feature, the DEPSS also claims the system allows one to create volcanoes that can erupt. What kid wouldn’t want to pull that one off? And the bonus is you wouldn’t need to clean up the baking soda afterwards.


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Trippy Non-Mechanical Ferrofluid Clock Features Self-Assembling, Organic Numbers

You simply have to see this. Imagine an Etch-a-Sketch had sex with a lava lamp, and the resultant offspring was raised by adoptive digital clock parents. The result could only be the Ferrolic Display, a wonderfully bizarre time-telling device created by designer Zelf Koelman.

Ferrolic from zelfkoelman on Vimeo.

Eindhoven-based Koelman has harnessed ferrofluid, a/k/a ferromagnetic fluid, with electromagnets within the device to dynamically form the numbers. The Ferrolic is of course run on software, which means the device needn’t be a clock, but could presumably be hacked to deliver your text messages and the like.

However, in its current iteration the product wouldn’t last long. Still in the prototype stages, “the lifetime of the fluids used in the glass container module mainly depends on the frequency of use. In practice this lifetime is expected to be a few months of full usage,” Koelman writes. However, he also adds that “Ongoing development allows for a much longer lifetime in the near future.”

Without the means of mass production, Koelman is selling 24 prototype-stage Ferrolics for €7,500 (pre-tax), or about USD $ 8,576. Users can connect to the device via Wi-Fi and control it via web browser. As for the short lifespan, the language on the Inquiries page of Ferrolic’s website isn’t quite clear, but it appears one may be able to order updated glass modules in the future.


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