Tag Archives: tools

Uncovering Tools That Haven’t Been Touched Since 1941

Hey readers, here’s Part 2 of the New Deal tool chest find (Part 1 is here) by guest writer Dr. James E. Price. Dr. Price is an anthropologist, archaeologist and an accomplished joiner. You’ll find his bio down at the bottom. He’s managed to acquire a toolbox, still filled with tools, originally issued by the U.S. Government in 1933 for the Civilian Conservation Corps (read our story on the CCC here). It’s a very rare find with great American historical significance.

The rest of the entry is in Price’s words, edited for length and clarity. The photos and captions below are his.

Dr. Price writes:

Each of the tools in the chest was numbered by a stamp or engraving on the tool itself and there is a numbered brass tack beside the place it goes in the chest. I promised you that I would feature the tools on this page one at a time and you can assist with the research of its manufacturer, the years it was offered, a picture of it in a period catalog, or any other information pertinent to each tool.

We start this evening with the claw hammer which is Number 32 and is secured in the top till by a brass spring clip. The manufacturer’s imprint is on one cheek of the hammer and the other side is stamped “USVA”. The latter stands for The US Veterans Administration. They were used at The VA Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri.

Thank you for sharing your knowledge about a tool if you have information on it.

The subject clawhammer is in the top till.
The imprint has been damaged but it appears to read, “C. OGDEN, NEW YORK”. The “C” is somewhat questionable.
You can see the original inventory number stamp, “32”, on the wooden handle right behind the head.
The other side of the hammer head is stamped, “USVA”.

Next I continued cleaning and stabilizing tools in the top till. Here I’ll show you the three little Stanley Hurwood screwdrivers and two awls. The three screwdrivers are on the upper left of the photo below, each one in a spring clip with their tips in slots in a piece of wood glued in the end of the till. They are each marked “26”. One of the awls, the one with a beech handle, marked “25” is above the screwdrivers and the other one with an ebonized handle, stamped, “48” is to the left of the hammer. All the tools in the top till are marked, “USVA”.

This is a closeup of the three Stanley Hurwood screwdrivers.
The words “STANLEY HURWOOD, PAT. APPL’D FOR” are stamped on the handle of each screwdriver. The handles appear to be rosewood.
This awl is stamped “25” and the handle is beech. In small letters the wood is stamped “BUCK MFG. CO.”
The upper awl has an ebonized handle with no manufacturing marks but is stamped “48”.

It is likely the tools were issued in 1933 or 1934 and probably never used after the beginning of WWII. The chest and its tools gives us an intimate view of what was needed by finish carpenters in those years. To my knowledge no other complete government-issued tool chest and its contents survived from The New Deal Era so this one is a unique cultural resource that demands careful preservation and study.

Hand-tool beginners who frequently ask what tools they need, take heed. If you assemble a set of tools of the functional types found in this chest, you will have enough tools to make lots of wonderful wooden things.

The photo below shows the back left corner of the bottom of the chest. Note the three gimlets resting in holes in an upright board and the block plane secured to that board with a leather strap.

The tools were rusty from being in the bottom of the chest. Tools in the three tills above this bottom tier are not nearly as rusty.
The block plane is a Stanley 220 and the blade has been hollow ground so it saw use. The japanning is near 100%. This photo shows the disassembled plane after cleaning. No attempt was made to remove stains remaining after the powder rust was removed.
The gimlets did not fare as well as the block plane. They had a rust encrustation on the steel bits. Once the rust was removed some pitting is evident. The handles are rosewood.
I was born December 28, 1944 and the chest and its tools are a decade older than me but probably ceased to be used right before I was born. Of course I had to try out the gimlets knowing that my hand was the next one to use them since they were put away in the bottom of the chest by the carpenter who last used them.
This is a photo of the gimlets and Stanley 220 block plane cleaned and stabilized before I returned them to their proper place in the bottom of the chest that has been their home for 80 years.
This photo shows the three gimlets and block plane back in the chest.
The New Deal Tool Chest and its tools are currently on public exhibition in the lobby of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways Headquarters in Van Buren, Missouri. The exhibit will go through October, 2017.
This is a photo of the top three tills and their contents on display by The ONSR Interpretative Division of this National Park.

Stay tuned as I go through the rest. As I continue to remove tools from the chest I’ll describe them after I have given them a light cleaning.

________________________________

Anthropologist and archaeologist Dr. James E. Price grew up watching his father make ax handles, gun ramrods, sassafras boat paddles, cedar turkey calls and furniture. His father taught him the art of joinery. “Woodworking was important on our Ozark farm. My family owned a small sawmill which produced lumber for use on the farm. We built buildings, repaired wagons, made furniture and boat paddles, and many other objects and structures of wood.”

Dr. Price, a sixth generation Ozark dweller, prizes the careful process of using hand tools to create objects that he sees as useful, functional art. “Without using any fossil fuel source, I can take a pile of boards and make them into an object of beauty. The tools are the instrument, and the piece becomes a kind of permanent music. If it doesn’t burn or blow away, it can last a thousand years—it will be impossible to pull apart.”


Core77

Uncovering Tools That Haven’t Been Touched Since 1941

Hey readers, here’s Part 2 of the New Deal tool chest find (Part 1 is here) by guest writer Dr. James E. Price. Dr. Price is an anthropologist, archaeologist and an accomplished joiner. You’ll find his bio down at the bottom. He’s managed to acquire a toolbox, still filled with tools, originally issued by the U.S. Government in 1933 for the Civilian Conservation Corps (read our story on the CCC here). It’s a very rare find with great American historical significance.

The rest of the entry is in Price’s words, edited for length and clarity. The photos and captions below are his.

Dr. Price writes:

Each of the tools in the chest was numbered by a stamp or engraving on the tool itself and there is a numbered brass tack beside the place it goes in the chest. I promised you that I would feature the tools on this page one at a time and you can assist with the research of its manufacturer, the years it was offered, a picture of it in a period catalog, or any other information pertinent to each tool.

We start this evening with the claw hammer which is Number 32 and is secured in the top till by a brass spring clip. The manufacturer’s imprint is on one cheek of the hammer and the other side is stamped “USVA”. The latter stands for The US Veterans Administration. They were used at The VA Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri.

Thank you for sharing your knowledge about a tool if you have information on it.

The subject clawhammer is in the top till.
The imprint has been damaged but it appears to read, “C. OGDEN, NEW YORK”. The “C” is somewhat questionable.
You can see the original inventory number stamp, “32”, on the wooden handle right behind the head.
The other side of the hammer head is stamped, “USVA”.

Next I continued cleaning and stabilizing tools in the top till. Here I’ll show you the three little Stanley Hurwood screwdrivers and two awls. The three screwdrivers are on the upper left of the photo below, each one in a spring clip with their tips in slots in a piece of wood glued in the end of the till. They are each marked “26”. One of the awls, the one with a beech handle, marked “25” is above the screwdrivers and the other one with an ebonized handle, stamped, “48” is to the left of the hammer. All the tools in the top till are marked, “USVA”.

This is a closeup of the three Stanley Hurwood screwdrivers.
The words “STANLEY HURWOOD, PAT. APPL’D FOR” are stamped on the handle of each screwdriver. The handles appear to be rosewood.
This awl is stamped “25” and the handle is beech. In small letters the wood is stamped “BUCK MFG. CO.”
The upper awl has an ebonized handle with no manufacturing marks but is stamped “48”.

It is likely the tools were issued in 1933 or 1934 and probably never used after the beginning of WWII. The chest and its tools gives us an intimate view of what was needed by finish carpenters in those years. To my knowledge no other complete government-issued tool chest and its contents survived from The New Deal Era so this one is a unique cultural resource that demands careful preservation and study.

Hand-tool beginners who frequently ask what tools they need, take heed. If you assemble a set of tools of the functional types found in this chest, you will have enough tools to make lots of wonderful wooden things.

The photo below shows the back left corner of the bottom of the chest. Note the three gimlets resting in holes in an upright board and the block plane secured to that board with a leather strap.

The tools were rusty from being in the bottom of the chest. Tools in the three tills above this bottom tier are not nearly as rusty.
The block plane is a Stanley 220 and the blade has been hollow ground so it saw use. The japanning is near 100%. This photo shows the disassembled plane after cleaning. No attempt was made to remove stains remaining after the powder rust was removed.
The gimlets did not fare as well as the block plane. They had a rust encrustation on the steel bits. Once the rust was removed some pitting is evident. The handles are rosewood.
I was born December 28, 1944 and the chest and its tools are a decade older than me but probably ceased to be used right before I was born. Of course I had to try out the gimlets knowing that my hand was the next one to use them since they were put away in the bottom of the chest by the carpenter who last used them.
This is a photo of the gimlets and Stanley 220 block plane cleaned and stabilized before I returned them to their proper place in the bottom of the chest that has been their home for 80 years.
This photo shows the three gimlets and block plane back in the chest.
The New Deal Tool Chest and its tools are currently on public exhibition in the lobby of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways Headquarters in Van Buren, Missouri. The exhibit will go through October, 2017.
This is a photo of the top three tills and their contents on display by The ONSR Interpretative Division of this National Park.

Stay tuned as I go through the rest. As I continue to remove tools from the chest I’ll describe them after I have given them a light cleaning.

________________________________

Anthropologist and archaeologist Dr. James E. Price grew up watching his father make ax handles, gun ramrods, sassafras boat paddles, cedar turkey calls and furniture. His father taught him the art of joinery. “Woodworking was important on our Ozark farm. My family owned a small sawmill which produced lumber for use on the farm. We built buildings, repaired wagons, made furniture and boat paddles, and many other objects and structures of wood.”

Dr. Price, a sixth generation Ozark dweller, prizes the careful process of using hand tools to create objects that he sees as useful, functional art. “Without using any fossil fuel source, I can take a pile of boards and make them into an object of beauty. The tools are the instrument, and the piece becomes a kind of permanent music. If it doesn’t burn or blow away, it can last a thousand years—it will be impossible to pull apart.”


Core77

Toy Design & Casting, Testing Power Carving Tools, How to Tap Threads into Wood and More

Mr. Pen Man

Something very different from Jimmy DiResta this week. Jimmy, a former toy designer, goes back to his roots:

Testing Out Arbortech’s Power Carving Tools

Izzy Swan recently purchased a set of Arbortech’s stuff, and does an experimental carving to learn how to use them:

Art Frame

Frank Howarth creates a rail-and-stile frame for the large art piece he created last week, taking care to ensure the 4-foot-wide centerpiece has room to expand and contract:

Making an Axe Handle

April Wilkerson “gets the hang” of making an axe handle after a mid-project setback:

Tapping Threads Into Wood

Marc Spagnuolo is bringing a new tool to market, a set of taps designed to be used in wood. Check out some of the applications:

Building French Doors

Pretty cool to see from start to finish: The Samurai Carpenter builds, including the framing, a large set of wood-framed glass doors from scratch and installs it all:


Core77

Toy Design & Casting, Testing Power Carving Tools, How to Tap Threads into Wood and More

Mr. Pen Man

Something very different from Jimmy DiResta this week. Jimmy, a former toy designer, goes back to his roots:

Testing Out Arbortech’s Power Carving Tools

Izzy Swan recently purchased a set of Arbortech’s stuff, and does an experimental carving to learn how to use them:

Art Frame

Frank Howarth creates a rail-and-stile frame for the large art piece he created last week, taking care to ensure the 4-foot-wide centerpiece has room to expand and contract:

Making an Axe Handle

April Wilkerson “gets the hang” of making an axe handle after a mid-project setback:

Tapping Threads Into Wood

Marc Spagnuolo is bringing a new tool to market, a set of taps designed to be used in wood. Check out some of the applications:

Building French Doors

Pretty cool to see from start to finish: The Samurai Carpenter builds, including the framing, a large set of wood-framed glass doors from scratch and installs it all:


Core77

Toy Design & Casting, Testing Power Carving Tools, How to Tap Threads into Wood and More

Mr. Pen Man

Something very different from Jimmy DiResta this week. Jimmy, a former toy designer, goes back to his roots:

Testing Out Arbortech’s Power Carving Tools

Izzy Swan recently purchased a set of Arbortech’s stuff, and does an experimental carving to learn how to use them:

Art Frame

Frank Howarth creates a rail-and-stile frame for the large art piece he created last week, taking care to ensure the 4-foot-wide centerpiece has room to expand and contract:

Making an Axe Handle

April Wilkerson “gets the hang” of making an axe handle after a mid-project setback:

Tapping Threads Into Wood

Marc Spagnuolo is bringing a new tool to market, a set of taps designed to be used in wood. Check out some of the applications:

Building French Doors

Pretty cool to see from start to finish: The Samurai Carpenter builds, including the framing, a large set of wood-framed glass doors from scratch and installs it all:


Core77

How to Acquire Inexpensive Shop Tools, Troubleshooting a Bandsaw, Making Eyeglasses from Scratch–Including the Lenses!–& More

Space-Saving Flipping Lathe Cabinet

Leave it to Izzy Swan to come up with an ingenious way to place a lathe inside a crowded shop. It not only flips into position when needed, but check out how he’s rigged it up to slide the existing cabinet-top, mounted with a spindle sander, out of the way:

Troubleshooting a Vibrating Bandsaw

After noticing undue vibration in his bandsaw, Matthias Wandel shows you how to examine each component, to investigate the cause and come up with a fix:

Premium vs Semi-Premium hand planes

This one’s probably not for the hand tool uninitiated, as some knowledge is required to understand the vid. Here Jay Bates runs down what the real differences are between a Wood River smoothing plane, and a Lie-Nielsen smoothing plane that costs about twice as much.

Making an End Grain Knife Throwing Target

Endgrain cutting board? Not for April Wilkerson, who’s got a knife-throwing habit. Thus, she makes an endgrain target board. It sounds like a simple project, but she shows her talent for thinking ahead and discarding the typical design, instead devising something much easier to maintain. (Also, Green Bay fans are advised to not watch the ending of this video!)

How to Outfit Your Shop on the Cheap

Steve Ramsey runs down some tips for those of you who need to buy tools but are on a budget:

How To Make Eyeglasses From Scratch

This is crazy! The “How to Make Everything” channel literally made everything required for spectacles, making the glass from scratch. And grinding the lenses to match his prescription. And harvesting and milling the lumber to make the frames out of. Not everything goes according to plan, of course:

And here’s David Picciuto creating the frames seen in the alternate pair, with more success:


Core77

How to Acquire Inexpensive Shop Tools, Troubleshooting a Bandsaw, Making Eyeglasses from Scratch–Including the Lenses!–& More

Space-Saving Flipping Lathe Cabinet

Leave it to Izzy Swan to come up with an ingenious way to place a lathe inside a crowded shop. It not only flips into position when needed, but check out how he’s rigged it up to slide the existing cabinet-top, mounted with a spindle sander, out of the way:

Troubleshooting a Vibrating Bandsaw

After noticing undue vibration in his bandsaw, Matthias Wandel shows you how to examine each component, to investigate the cause and come up with a fix:

Premium vs Semi-Premium hand planes

This one’s probably not for the hand tool uninitiated, as some knowledge is required to understand the vid. Here Jay Bates runs down what the real differences are between a Wood River smoothing plane, and a Lie-Nielsen smoothing plane that costs about twice as much.

Making an End Grain Knife Throwing Target

Endgrain cutting board? Not for April Wilkerson, who’s got a knife-throwing habit. Thus, she makes an endgrain target board. It sounds like a simple project, but she shows her talent for thinking ahead and discarding the typical design, instead devising something much easier to maintain. (Also, Green Bay fans are advised to not watch the ending of this video!)

How to Outfit Your Shop on the Cheap

Steve Ramsey runs down some tips for those of you who need to buy tools but are on a budget:

How To Make Eyeglasses From Scratch

This is crazy! The “How to Make Everything” channel literally made everything required for spectacles, making the glass from scratch. And grinding the lenses to match his prescription. And harvesting and milling the lumber to make the frames out of. Not everything goes according to plan, of course:

And here’s David Picciuto creating the frames seen in the alternate pair, with more success:


Core77

How to Acquire Inexpensive Shop Tools, Troubleshooting a Bandsaw, Making Eyeglasses from Scratch–Including the Lenses!–& More

Space-Saving Flipping Lathe Cabinet

Leave it to Izzy Swan to come up with an ingenious way to place a lathe inside a crowded shop. It not only flips into position when needed, but check out how he’s rigged it up to slide the existing cabinet-top, mounted with a spindle sander, out of the way:

Troubleshooting a Vibrating Bandsaw

After noticing undue vibration in his bandsaw, Matthias Wandel shows you how to examine each component, to investigate the cause and come up with a fix:

Premium vs Semi-Premium hand planes

This one’s probably not for the hand tool uninitiated, as some knowledge is required to understand the vid. Here Jay Bates runs down what the real differences are between a Wood River smoothing plane, and a Lie-Nielsen smoothing plane that costs about twice as much.

Making an End Grain Knife Throwing Target

Endgrain cutting board? Not for April Wilkerson, who’s got a knife-throwing habit. Thus, she makes an endgrain target board. It sounds like a simple project, but she shows her talent for thinking ahead and discarding the typical design, instead devising something much easier to maintain. (Also, Green Bay fans are advised to not watch the ending of this video!)

How to Outfit Your Shop on the Cheap

Steve Ramsey runs down some tips for those of you who need to buy tools but are on a budget:

How To Make Eyeglasses From Scratch

This is crazy! The “How to Make Everything” channel literally made everything required for spectacles, making the glass from scratch. And grinding the lenses to match his prescription. And harvesting and milling the lumber to make the frames out of. Not everything goes according to plan, of course:

And here’s David Picciuto creating the frames seen in the alternate pair, with more success:


Core77

The CCC Toolbox Find: “A Time Capsule of Hand Tools”

Hey readers, we’re excited to bring you this story and photo series from guest writer Dr. James E. Price. Dr. Price is an anthropologist, archaeologist and an accomplished joiner. You’ll find his bio down at the bottom. He’s managed to acquire a toolbox, still filled with tools, originally issued by the U.S. Government in 1933 for the Civilian Conservation Corps (read our story on the CCC here). It’s a very rare find with great American historical significance.

The rest of the entry is in Price’s words, edited for length and clarity. The photos and captions below are his.

Dr. Price writes:

October 29, 1929, a day so important in our history. It was the day the US stock market crashed and ushered in The Great Depression that lasted for more than a decade.

Franklin D. Roosevelt became the 32nd president in 1933. Have you heard the stories about how Roosevelt put the nation back to work as part of The New Deal, through the Works Progress Administration and Civilian Conservation Corps? He declared in January 1933 that he would have at least 300,000 teenage boys in training camps by July 1 of that year and he met that goal with the assistance of the US Army, The US Forest Service, and The National Park Service.

What does this brief history lesson have to do with this toolbox? For the most part the CCC as well as the WPA used hand tools. They built all sorts of structures in state parks across our nation with unpowered tools.

Eight years ago I was Chief Of Resources Management for The National Park Service at Ozark National Scenic Riverways in Missouri and had the opportunity to purchase an original CCC tool chest as issued in 1933. This chest was found in a basement in St. Louis and had been placed there by a man who helped build a VA hospital. The Heritage Shop at Ozark NSR is now beginning the cleaning and conservation of each tool.

The purpose of this post is to introduce you to this chest and its contents so you can witness a time capsule of hand tools being opened. As time passes and we clean each tool I will be describing it and identifying its manufacturer. So, in your comments please do not ask me who made the hatchet or any other tool because I do not know yet. I will share that with you in posts over the next few months.

I hope you like your initial introduction to this chest and its contents.

This is the front of the chest on which is stenciled, “TOOL CHEST”.
This is the top of the chest and on it is stenciled, “MED DEPARTMENT USA”.
This is one end of the chest showing the handle and steel brackets.
This is what you see when the chest is opened.
This shows the contents of the top till. A numbered screen tack is with each tool. The white tags are ours as we begin to inventory the chest’s contents.
This is a detail of one corner of the top till.
Another detail of the top till contents.
This is a view of the contents of the second till. Note the built in box in the upper left corner.
This photo shows the box opened.
This is a view of the contents of the third till.
The tin box in the corner contains little box nails.
This photo shows the contents of the bottom till which rests on the bottom of the chest but can be removed.
These two marking gauges are well marked. At least some of the metal tools have been stamped “CCC”.
This plane is stamped USVA, which indicates it was property of The Veterans Administration.
This is a detail of some of the contents of the bottom till.
There is a 220 block plane held by a leather strap in the bottom till as well as a jointer.

This post is merely your first visit with the chest and its tools. Of interest to me is, if any of you have seen a New Deal tool chest and its tools. Is this the only one to survive or are there others?

________________________________

Anthropologist and archaeologist Dr. James E. Price grew up watching his father make ax handles, gun ramrods, sassafras boat paddles, cedar turkey calls and furniture. His father taught him the art of joinery. “Woodworking was important on our Ozark farm. My family owned a small sawmill which produced lumber for use on the farm. We built buildings, repaired wagons, made furniture and boat paddles, and many other objects and structures of wood.”

Dr. Price, a sixth generation Ozark dweller, prizes the careful process of using hand tools to create objects that he sees as useful, functional art. “Without using any fossil fuel source, I can take a pile of boards and make them into an object of beauty. The tools are the instrument, and the piece becomes a kind of permanent music. If it doesn’t burn or blow away, it can last a thousand years—it will be impossible to pull apart.”


Core77

Top 10 Most Useful Tools, a Mid-Century Modern Credenza, a DIY Camera Gantry Crane & More

Modern Wardrobe Project

Jimmy DiResta builds a large wardrobe out of five sheets of plywood, with a little help from Rockler:

Jack and Jill Bathroom, Part 2

One-woman construction crew Sandra Powell frames out the bathroom she ripped out last week:

10 Favorite Tools

Linn from Darbin Orvar rounds up her ten favorite, most useful tools from 2016:

Hexagon Lamp

Laura Kampf creates a handsome hexagonal lamp out of oak and brass:

Wooden Camera Gantry

John Heisz finally gives us a good look at his amazing camera gantry crane, which we previously only caught a glimpse of:

Designing and Building A Modern Credenza

Chris Salomone creates a Mid-Century-Modern-looking credenza, having to work out some complicated angles along the way:

How to Make a Contemporary Dining Table

Amidst California’s recent Stormageddon, Steve Ramsey builds a simple dining table:


Core77

Top 10 Most Useful Tools, a Mid-Century Modern Credenza, a DIY Camera Gantry Crane & More

Modern Wardrobe Project

Jimmy DiResta builds a large wardrobe out of five sheets of plywood, with a little help from Rockler:

Jack and Jill Bathroom, Part 2

One-woman construction crew Sandra Powell frames out the bathroom she ripped out last week:

10 Favorite Tools

Linn from Darbin Orvar rounds up her ten favorite, most useful tools from 2016:

Hexagon Lamp

Laura Kampf creates a handsome hexagonal lamp out of oak and brass:

Wooden Camera Gantry

John Heisz finally gives us a good look at his amazing camera gantry crane, which we previously only caught a glimpse of:

Designing and Building A Modern Credenza

Chris Salomone creates a Mid-Century-Modern-looking credenza, having to work out some complicated angles along the way:

How to Make a Contemporary Dining Table

Amidst California’s recent Stormageddon, Steve Ramsey builds a simple dining table:


Core77

Top 10 Most Useful Tools, a Mid-Century Modern Credenza, a DIY Camera Gantry Crane & More

Modern Wardrobe Project

Jimmy DiResta builds a large wardrobe out of five sheets of plywood, with a little help from Rockler:

Jack and Jill Bathroom, Part 2

One-woman construction crew Sandra Powell frames out the bathroom she ripped out last week:

10 Favorite Tools

Linn from Darbin Orvar rounds up her ten favorite, most useful tools from 2016:

Hexagon Lamp

Laura Kampf creates a handsome hexagonal lamp out of oak and brass:

Wooden Camera Gantry

John Heisz finally gives us a good look at his amazing camera gantry crane, which we previously only caught a glimpse of:

Designing and Building A Modern Credenza

Chris Salomone creates a Mid-Century-Modern-looking credenza, having to work out some complicated angles along the way:

How to Make a Contemporary Dining Table

Amidst California’s recent Stormageddon, Steve Ramsey builds a simple dining table:


Core77

Linn’s Top Ten Most Useful Tools, a Mid-Century Modern Credenza, a DIY Camera Gantry Crane & More

Modern Wardrobe Project

Jimmy builds a large wardrobe out of five sheets of plywood, with a little help from Rockler:

Jack and Jill Bathroom, Part 2

One-woman construction crew Sandra Powell frames out the bathroom she ripped out last week:

10 Favorite Tools

Linn from Darbin Orvar rounds up her ten favorite, most useful tools from 2016:

Hexagon Lamp

Laura Kampf creates a handsome hexagonal lamp out of oak and brass:

Wooden Camera Gantry

John Heisz finally gives us a good look at his amazing camera gantry crane, which we previously only caught a glimpse of:

Designing and Building A Modern Credenza

Chris Salomone creates a Mid-Century-Modern-looking credenza, having to work out some complicated angles along the way:

How to Make a Contemporary Dining Table

Amidst California’s recent Stormageddon, Steve Ramsey builds a simple dining table:


Core77

Linn’s Top Ten Most Useful Tools, a Mid-Century Modern Credenza, a DIY Camera Gantry Crane & More

Modern Wardrobe Project

Jimmy builds a large wardrobe out of five sheets of plywood, with a little help from Rockler:

Jack and Jill Bathroom, Part 2

One-woman construction crew Sandra Powell frames out the bathroom she ripped out last week:

10 Favorite Tools

Linn from Darbin Orvar rounds up her ten favorite, most useful tools from 2016:

Hexagon Lamp

Laura Kampf creates a handsome hexagonal lamp out of oak and brass:

Wooden Camera Gantry

John Heisz finally gives us a good look at his amazing camera gantry crane, which we previously only caught a glimpse of:

Designing and Building A Modern Credenza

Chris Salomone creates a Mid-Century-Modern-looking credenza, having to work out some complicated angles along the way:

How to Make a Contemporary Dining Table

Amidst California’s recent Stormageddon, Steve Ramsey builds a simple dining table:


Core77

Linn’s Top Ten Most Useful Tools, a Mid-Century Modern Credenza, a DIY Camera Gantry Crane & More

Modern Wardrobe Project

Jimmy builds a large wardrobe out of five sheets of plywood, with a little help from Rockler:

Jack and Jill Bathroom, Part 2

One-woman construction crew Sandra Powell frames out the bathroom she ripped out last week:

10 Favorite Tools

Linn from Darbin Orvar rounds up her ten favorite, most useful tools from 2016:

Hexagon Lamp

Laura Kampf creates a handsome hexagonal lamp out of oak and brass:

Wooden Camera Gantry

John Heisz finally gives us a good look at his amazing camera gantry crane, which we previously only caught a glimpse of:

Designing and Building A Modern Credenza

Chris Salomone creates a Mid-Century-Modern-looking credenza, having to work out some complicated angles along the way:

How to Make a Contemporary Dining Table

Amidst California’s recent Stormageddon, Steve Ramsey builds a simple dining table:


Core77

Linn’s Top Ten Most Useful Tools, a Mid-Century Modern Credenza, a DIY Camera Gantry Crane & More

Modern Wardrobe Project

Jimmy builds a large wardrobe out of five sheets of plywood, with a little help from Rockler:

Jack and Jill Bathroom, Part 2

One-woman construction crew Sandra Powell frames out the bathroom she ripped out last week:

10 Favorite Tools

Linn from Darbin Orvar rounds up her ten favorite, most useful tools from 2016:

Hexagon Lamp

Laura Kampf creates a handsome hexagonal lamp out of oak and brass:

Wooden Camera Gantry

John Heisz finally gives us a good look at his amazing camera gantry crane, which we previously only caught a glimpse of:

Designing and Building A Modern Credenza

Chris Salomone creates a Mid-Century-Modern-looking credenza, having to work out some complicated angles along the way:

How to Make a Contemporary Dining Table

Amidst California’s recent Stormageddon, Steve Ramsey builds a simple dining table:


Core77

Linn’s Top Ten Most Useful Tools, a Mid-Century Modern Credenza, a DIY Camera Gantry Crane & More

Modern Wardrobe Project

Jimmy builds a large wardrobe out of five sheets of plywood, with a little help from Rockler:

Jack and Jill Bathroom, Part 2

One-woman construction crew Sandra Powell frames out the bathroom she ripped out last week:

10 Favorite Tools

Linn from Darbin Orvar rounds up her ten favorite, most useful tools from 2016:

Hexagon Lamp

Laura Kampf creates a handsome hexagonal lamp out of oak and brass:

Wooden Camera Gantry

John Heisz finally gives us a good look at his amazing camera gantry crane, which we previously only caught a glimpse of:

Designing and Building A Modern Credenza

Chris Salomone creates a Mid-Century-Modern-looking credenza, having to work out some complicated angles along the way:

How to Make a Contemporary Dining Table

Amidst California’s recent Stormageddon, Steve Ramsey builds a simple dining table:


Core77

2016’s Best of Hand Tools

There is nothing quite so satisfying as manipulating materials using hand tools. There’s a level of connection with the work, and human finesse, that you just can’t get using things that plug into the wall.

There’s been a bit of a handplane craze in recent years, and a handful of artisans are beautifying them with intricate engravings.

In “Built to Last: Reviewing a 40-Year-Old Tool,” we heard one of the best hand tool stories we’d ever heard, courtesy of David Waelder.

This year we got a reminder that splines used to be physical objects. Yep, this is how you drew large curves back in the day.

Just what the heck is this thing? Tool correspondent David Frane came across this cast-iron bamboo-splitting tool from Japan. Click the link to see how it works.

We spotted this crazy-looking Chinese foot-powered lathe with a centuries-old design. This is another one where you’ve got to click the linke and check out the video. It’s like a cross between a lathe and an elliptical machine!

Another forgotten tool was this 18th-Century French furniture-polishing object, resurrected by furniture maker Don Williams. Now that you can buy them again, the polissoirs have proven popular.

This year we saw a rash of unique hammer designs, from old-school Latthammers to Fiskars’ modern IsoCores to Estwing’s totally newfangled, multi-material deadblow AL-Pro.

Speaking of hammers, we also saw this pair of hammer-proof gloves. We think they should call them “No More Ouchies” and market them to macho contractors.

When it comes to hand tool workbenches, vises are a virtue. We took a look at Benchcrafted’s drool-worhty, top-of-the-line vise hardware.

We spotted this insanely dense antique tool storage cabinet. The darn thing was listed for $ 150,000 (including the tools) at auction.

Most of us learned to use power tools at ID school, but design schools seem to place little emphasis on hand tools these days. Some of you may have no experience with them at all. In order to fill that gap, this year we brought on two experts in their use. Joel Moskowitz of Gramercy Tools shares his weekly thoughts in his “Tools & Craft” section, while Shannon Rogers, founder of the Hand Tool School, now has a Core77 series that we’ve cleverly named “Hand Tool School.” Check ’em both out!


Core77

2016’s Best of Hand Tools

There is nothing quite so satisfying as manipulating materials using hand tools. There’s a level of connection with the work, and human finesse, that you just can’t get using things that plug into the wall.

There’s been a bit of a handplane craze in recent years, and a handful of artisans are beautifying them with intricate engravings.

In “Built to Last: Reviewing a 40-Year-Old Tool,” we heard one of the best hand tool stories we’d ever heard, courtesy of David Waelder.

This year we got a reminder that splines used to be physical objects. Yep, this is how you drew large curves back in the day.

Just what the heck is this thing? Tool correspondent David Frane came across this cast-iron bamboo-splitting tool from Japan. Click the link to see how it works.

We spotted this crazy-looking Chinese foot-powered lathe with a centuries-old design. This is another one where you’ve got to click the linke and check out the video. It’s like a cross between a lathe and an elliptical machine!

Another forgotten tool was this 18th-Century French furniture-polishing object, resurrected by furniture maker Don Williams. Now that you can buy them again, the polissoirs have proven popular.

This year we saw a rash of unique hammer designs, from old-school Latthammers to Fiskars’ modern IsoCores to Estwing’s totally newfangled, multi-material deadblow AL-Pro.

Speaking of hammers, we also saw this pair of hammer-proof gloves. We think they should call them “No More Ouchies” and market them to macho contractors.

When it comes to hand tool workbenches, vises are a virtue. We took a look at Benchcrafted’s drool-worhty, top-of-the-line vise hardware.

We spotted this insanely dense antique tool storage cabinet. The darn thing was listed for $ 150,000 (including the tools) at auction.

Most of us learned to use power tools at ID school, but design schools seem to place little emphasis on hand tools these days. Some of you may have no experience with them at all. In order to fill that gap, this year we brought on two experts in their use. Joel Moskowitz of Gramercy Tools shares his weekly thoughts in his “Tools & Craft” section, while Shannon Rogers, founder of the Hand Tool School, now has a Core77 series that we’ve cleverly named “Hand Tool School.” Check ’em both out!


Core77