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An oil slick at this MotoGP race sends the field flying

Filed under: ,,,

Luckily, no one was seriously injured.

Continue reading An oil slick at this MotoGP race sends the field flying

An oil slick at this MotoGP race sends the field flying originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 22 May 2017 18:30:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

This electric Volkswagen Thing is more fun than a new e-Golf

Filed under: ,,,

The new electric powertrain is making nearly four times the power of the old flat-four.

Continue reading This electric Volkswagen Thing is more fun than a new e-Golf

This electric Volkswagen Thing is more fun than a new e-Golf originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 10 May 2017 17:22:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink |  Email this |  Comments
Autoblog

The Design Flaws in This Otherwise Nifty Portable Cassette Player

Sometimes novel designs are not good ones, but have enough “wow” factor to create desirability in those who aren’t thinking it through. I’ll put this Elbow portable cassette player concept in this category. Designed to reduce a Walkman to the barest minimum, it consists of a biaxial arm and provides what initially looks to be a satisfying way to interface with and manipulate a cassette.

The first axis of the arm allows the user to clasp it shut, inserting a spindle into one of the cassette’s gears. The device is then rotated so that the magnetic head can read the tape.

Controls are provided by a single dial which regulates the volume, play, and fast forward functions.

Seems nifty, doesn’t it? But we see several problems that actually make this design a step backwards from Sony’s venerated Walkman. First off is the problem of directionality/orientation. Cassettes have two sides, and the user selects which side of the tape they’d like to listen to. With the Walkman and every other cassette player, this problem is solved in an obvious way: The desired side of the cassette faces outwards.

With the design of the Elbow, “outwards” is presumably the side with the dial on it. But the user is presented with one spindle and two cassette eyes that it could possibly be inserted into. Because the motor only rotates in one direction (there is no rewind functionality), the user must insert it into the correct hole, or risk unspooling the tape on one reel without the slack being taken up by the other reel. So right away, we’ve got the potential for operator error.

The second, more glaring problem is that the device appears to have been designed to make a neat photograph, rather than considering how the user will actually interact with it. Here’s what we mean:

Is the Elbow meant to be held in one’s hand for the entirety of the listening session? Or thrown in a bag? Either way the design, which leaves parts of the cassette exposed, presents a problem. Walkmen, while in use, were either held in the hand (while jogging, for instance), thrown into a jacket pocket, clipped to one’s belt or thrown into a bag. In all four of those scenarios, both eyes of the cassette and the exposed portion of the tape are completely enclosed by the Walkman; there is no danger that the user’s sweaty grip, or debris in a pocket or bag, will interfere with the tape or the cassette’s eyes. The relatively smooth outer shape of a Walkman also provided no sharp surfaces or undercuts which could snag on something. Those positive qualities are absent on the Elbow.

Nevertheless, we’ll probably continue to see these images being eagerly forwarded on social media, with folks proclaiming it a neat design. I suppose it is neat. It’s just not practical nor user-friendly.


Core77

This Saudi Artist Transforms Western Celebrities Into Khaleejis

Ben Affleck

Over the past couple of years, Saudi Photoshop master Al-Harithy has been creating photoshopped images of Western celebrities dressed up as citizens of the Arab gulf. In his pictures, male celebrities wear the traditional Khaleeji loose white garment that is similar to a robe (thawb) and a headdress (ghutra). Meanwhile, females don a ‘abaya and a headscarf.

More info: Instagram (h/t: stepfeed)

Rami Malek (Mr. Robot)

In an interview with Al-Arabiya, Al-Harithy said that “one picture can take up to two hours of consistent focusing to get the desired character.”

Dr. Dre

Leonardo DiCaprio

Kevin Spacey

Pablo Escobar

DJ Khaled

Rihanna

Jon Snow (Game of Thrones)

Jimmy Fallon

Steve Buscemi as Enoch “Nucky” Thompson (Boardwalk Empire)

Bradley Cooper

Forest Whitaker

Rick Ross

Matthew McConaughey

Miley Cyrus

Justin Timberlake

Mike Tyson

Will Smith

Chris Tucker

Mark Wahlberg and Ted

Cristiano Ronaldo

Al Pacino

Morgan Freeman

Oprah

George Clooney

Beyonce

Barack Obama


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

This Minimalist Goth Ice Cream Is The Ultimate Antithesis To The Unicorn Trend

Little Damage in Los Angeles is ushering in the goth trend, starting with a soft serve that resembles heavy metal music and black eyeliner. The flavour is almond charcoal and it gets its dark colour from activated charcoal.

More info: Instagram (h/t: lostateminor)
















Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

This Minimalist Goth Ice Cream Is The Ultimate Antithesis To The Unicorn Trend

Little Damage in Los Angeles is ushering in the goth trend, starting with a soft serve that resembles heavy metal music and black eyeliner. The flavour is almond charcoal and it gets its dark colour from activated charcoal.

More info: Instagram (h/t: lostateminor)
















Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

This Minimalist Goth Ice Cream Is The Ultimate Antithesis To The Unicorn Trend

Little Damage in Los Angeles is ushering in the goth trend, starting with a soft serve that resembles heavy metal music and black eyeliner. The flavour is almond charcoal and it gets its dark colour from activated charcoal.

More info: Instagram (h/t: lostateminor)
















Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.