Tag Archives: tables

Escape Into The Glass Rivers And Lakes Of These Beautiful Wood Tables

If getting lost in a coffee table sounds improbable, you may change your mind once you see these beautiful furnishings. Artist and designer Greg Klassen transforms reclaimed wood into mesmerizing works of art embedded with glass rivers and lakes. Klassen’s newest works include a variety of coffee tables of different sizes and shapes, as well as wall hangings.

More info: Greg Klassen (h/t: inhabitat, colossal)

“The collection is inspired by the exciting edges and vivid grains found in the trees sustainably taken from the banks of the Nooksack River that twists below my studio,” wrote Klassen.







DYT. Design is all around us.

Escape Into The Glass Rivers And Lakes Of These Beautiful Wood Tables

If getting lost in a coffee table sounds improbable, you may change your mind once you see these beautiful furnishings. Artist and designer Greg Klassen transforms reclaimed wood into mesmerizing works of art embedded with glass rivers and lakes. Klassen’s newest works include a variety of coffee tables of different sizes and shapes, as well as wall hangings.

More info: Greg Klassen (h/t: inhabitat, colossal)

“The collection is inspired by the exciting edges and vivid grains found in the trees sustainably taken from the banks of the Nooksack River that twists below my studio,” wrote Klassen.







DYT. Design is all around us.

Escape Into The Glass Rivers And Lakes Of These Beautiful Wood Tables

If getting lost in a coffee table sounds improbable, you may change your mind once you see these beautiful furnishings. Artist and designer Greg Klassen transforms reclaimed wood into mesmerizing works of art embedded with glass rivers and lakes. Klassen’s newest works include a variety of coffee tables of different sizes and shapes, as well as wall hangings.

More info: Greg Klassen (h/t: inhabitat, colossal)

“The collection is inspired by the exciting edges and vivid grains found in the trees sustainably taken from the banks of the Nooksack River that twists below my studio,” wrote Klassen.







DYT. Design is all around us.

Making Side Tables, Ornate Chisel Handles, Shop Drawers & More

Japanese Slick Handle & Leather Sheath

The Samurai Carpenter carves an impressive spiral-grip handle out of Ebony, then crafts a leather sheath for the Japanese chisel sent to him by Alec Steele:

Small Sword “Wall Hanger”

Jimmy DiResta starts off in a blacksmithing facility this week, hammering out a blade for the first time in the process of creating this small sword:

Making Drawers with Recessed Handles

I enjoy seeing Matthias Wandel make mistakes, not out of Schadenfreude, but because I myself always make mistakes and like to see how he compensates for them on-the-fly:

Making the Dust Collector Quieter

Matthias draws on what he learned in previous experiments, and applies a small design change to one of his DIY dust collectors in order to make it quieter:

Hickory Side Table

Jay Bates and his clone are back, knocking out a side table in this unnarrated, efficient build:

Making An End Table

April Wilkerson pays a visit to Laura Kampf’s shop in Germany, and the two collaborate on a steel and wood end table:

Soldering Fume Extractor with Third Hands

Bob Clagett uses four PC fans to create a soldering fume extractor. He also adds several “third hands” to hold wires in place, and designs the entire unit to fold flat:


Core77

Making Side Tables, Ornate Chisel Handles, Shop Drawers & More

Japanese Slick Handle & Leather Sheath

The Samurai Carpenter carves an impressive spiral-grip handle out of Ebony, then crafts a leather sheath for the Japanese chisel sent to him by Alec Steele:

Small Sword “Wall Hanger”

Jimmy DiResta starts off in a blacksmithing facility this week, hammering out a blade for the first time in the process of creating this small sword:

Making Drawers with Recessed Handles

I enjoy seeing Matthias Wandel make mistakes, not out of Schadenfreude, but because I myself always make mistakes and like to see how he compensates for them on-the-fly:

Making the Dust Collector Quieter

Matthias draws on what he learned in previous experiments, and applies a small design change to one of his DIY dust collectors in order to make it quieter:

Hickory Side Table

Jay Bates and his clone are back, knocking out a side table in this unnarrated, efficient build:

Making An End Table

April Wilkerson pays a visit to Laura Kampf’s shop in Germany, and the two collaborate on a steel and wood end table:

Soldering Fume Extractor with Third Hands

Bob Clagett uses four PC fans to create a soldering fume extractor. He also adds several “third hands” to hold wires in place, and designs the entire unit to fold flat:


Core77

Making Side Tables, Ornate Chisel Handles, Shop Drawers & More

Japanese Slick Handle & Leather Sheath

The Samurai Carpenter carves an impressive spiral-grip handle out of Ebony, then crafts a leather sheath for the Japanese chisel sent to him by Alec Steele:

Small Sword “Wall Hanger”

Jimmy DiResta starts off in a blacksmithing facility this week, hammering out a blade for the first time in the process of creating this small sword:

Making Drawers with Recessed Handles

I enjoy seeing Matthias Wandel make mistakes, not out of Schadenfreude, but because I myself always make mistakes and like to see how he compensates for them on-the-fly:

Making the Dust Collector Quieter

Matthias draws on what he learned in previous experiments, and applies a small design change to one of his DIY dust collectors in order to make it quieter:

Hickory Side Table

Jay Bates and his clone are back, knocking out a side table in this unnarrated, efficient build:

Making An End Table

April Wilkerson pays a visit to Laura Kampf’s shop in Germany, and the two collaborate on a steel and wood end table:

Soldering Fume Extractor with Third Hands

Bob Clagett uses four PC fans to create a soldering fume extractor. He also adds several “third hands” to hold wires in place, and designs the entire unit to fold flat:


Core77

Gyroscopic Pool Tables for Cruise Ships, Lighting Design by Minotaurs, Vacuum Hypocrisy & More

Seasick 8-Ball

“Self-stabilizing pool table on a cruise ship.”

Minotaur Lighting Design

“The shadow from this mounted Bulls head looks like it has a human body.”

[source]

Compensating for Typical Vending Machine Design

“These breath mints are taped to playing cards so they can be dispensed properly.”

[source

Layout Determined By Politics

“My university library has cnn on the far left and fox news on the far right.”

[source]

Tool Hack

“I didn’t have a caulk gun so I had to improvise”

[source]

One of These Things Sucks More Than the Other

“This lady cleaning with a vacuum at an iRobot shop.”

[source]

Birds Attracted to Cheap Prices

“Nothing to see here, just a Costco employee silently hunting a pigeon”

[source]

Mail the Force Be With You

“My neighbors mailbox”

[source]

Superior Toaster Interface Design

“My toaster has a button for when you need your toast done ‘a bit more'”

[source]


Core77

Gyroscopic Pool Tables for Cruise Ships, Lighting Design by Minotaurs, Vacuum Hypocrisy & More

Seasick 8-Ball

“Self-stabilizing pool table on a cruise ship.”

Minotaur Lighting Design

“The shadow from this mounted Bulls head looks like it has a human body.”

[source]

Compensating for Typical Vending Machine Design

“These breath mints are taped to playing cards so they can be dispensed properly.”

[source

Layout Determined By Politics

“My university library has cnn on the far left and fox news on the far right.”

[source]

Tool Hack

“I didn’t have a caulk gun so I had to improvise”

[source]

One of These Things Sucks More Than the Other

“This lady cleaning with a vacuum at an iRobot shop.”

[source]

Birds Attracted to Cheap Prices

“Nothing to see here, just a Costco employee silently hunting a pigeon”

[source]

Mail the Force Be With You

“My neighbors mailbox”

[source]

Superior Toaster Interface Design

“My toaster has a button for when you need your toast done ‘a bit more'”

[source]


Core77

Gyroscopic Pool Tables for Cruise Ships, Lighting Design by Minotaurs, Vacuum Hypocrisy & More

Seasick 8-Ball

“Self-stabilizing pool table on a cruise ship.”

Minotaur Lighting Design

“The shadow from this mounted Bulls head looks like it has a human body.”

[source]

Compensating for Typical Vending Machine Design

“These breath mints are taped to playing cards so they can be dispensed properly.”

[source

Layout Determined By Politics

“My university library has cnn on the far left and fox news on the far right.”

[source]

Tool Hack

“I didn’t have a caulk gun so I had to improvise”

[source]

One of These Things Sucks More Than the Other

“This lady cleaning with a vacuum at an iRobot shop.”

[source]

Birds Attracted to Cheap Prices

“Nothing to see here, just a Costco employee silently hunting a pigeon”

[source]

Mail the Force Be With You

“My neighbors mailbox”

[source]

Superior Toaster Interface Design

“My toaster has a button for when you need your toast done ‘a bit more'”

[source]


Core77

Gyroscopic Pool Tables for Cruise Ships, Lighting Design by Minotaurs, Vacuum Hypocrisy & More

Seasick 8-Ball

“Self-stabilizing pool table on a cruise ship.”

Minotaur Lighting Design

“The shadow from this mounted Bulls head looks like it has a human body.”

[source]

Compensating for Typical Vending Machine Design

“These breath mints are taped to playing cards so they can be dispensed properly.”

[source

Layout Determined By Politics

“My university library has cnn on the far left and fox news on the far right.”

[source]

Tool Hack

“I didn’t have a caulk gun so I had to improvise”

[source]

One of These Things Sucks More Than the Other

“This lady cleaning with a vacuum at an iRobot shop.”

[source]

Birds Attracted to Cheap Prices

“Nothing to see here, just a Costco employee silently hunting a pigeon”

[source]

Mail the Force Be With You

“My neighbors mailbox”

[source]

Superior Toaster Interface Design

“My toaster has a button for when you need your toast done ‘a bit more'”

[source]


Core77

DiResta’s Cut: Five Work Tables

How did you spend your holidays? Jimmy DiResta spent his working, both in his city and country shops, to produce (from scratch, naturally) a series of work tables for a school. As always he offers plenty of his signature tips, from why he prefers a bandsaw for cutting steel bar stock to how you can keep working even when the supplier’s closed to a clever trick with a ruler when you’re producing cut-offs. Watch and enjoy!


Core77

DiResta’s Cut: Five Work Tables

How did you spend your holidays? Jimmy DiResta spent his working, both in his city and country shops, to produce (from scratch, naturally) a series of work tables for a school. As always he offers plenty of his signature tips, from why he prefers a bandsaw for cutting steel bar stock to how you can keep working even when the supplier’s closed to a clever trick with a ruler when you’re producing cut-offs. Watch and enjoy!


Core77

DiResta’s Cut: Five Work Tables

How did you spend your holidays? Jimmy DiResta spent his working, both in his city and country shops, to produce (from scratch, naturally) a series of work tables for a school. As always he offers plenty of his signature tips, from why he prefers a bandsaw for cutting steel bar stock to how you can keep working even when the supplier’s closed to a clever trick with a ruler when you’re producing cut-offs. Watch and enjoy!


Core77

Bruce Shapiro Selling His Incredible Motorized Sand Drawing Tables

We were blown away when we first saw Bruce Shapiro’s incredible sand-drawing machines, which use hidden magnets and a steel ball to “draw.” Originally designed as art installations, Shapiro is now offering them for sale as tables on Kickstarter. Imagine seeing this every day in your own home:

Shapiro’s offering his Sisyphus line in three different sizes: A two-foot-diameter endtable, and three- and four-foot coffee tables. What’s interesting is that these designs have no off-switch, but draws continuously.

The motors are controlled by a small Raspberry Pi computer which plays a set of path files, much like a music player plays an mp3 file. Sisyphus has no on/off switch; you simply plug it in and it automatically calibrates itself, loads a default playlist of paths, and begins playing. You can control playback – choosing favorite tracks or playlists – speed of play, and table-lighting from a mobile app or by using any browser to connect to Sisyphus with WiFi.

Shapiro explains where the “playlist” analogy comes from, while revealing that end users can create their own patterns:

[I] view Sisyphus as more than a kinetic art piece: it is an instrument. As a musical instrument plays songs, Sisyphus plays paths. My goal with this Kickstarter is to get Sisyphus into people’s homes for them to enjoy as both furniture and art, but also, to inspire a community of composers to write “music” for it.

At press time there was 17 days left to pledge, and Shapiro was up to $ 1.2 million on a $ 50,000 goal.

The tables are surprisingly inexpensive, considering what they’re capable of. While the cheapest early-bird specials are all gone, buyers can pay in the $ 700 to $ 1,100 range to snag the remaining ones.


Core77

Magazine Storage: 12 Tables and Stools That Can Help Organize Publications

While coffee tables can be designed to store all kinds of things, some coffee tables—along with side tables and stools—are designed specifically to hold magazines. 

Rform’s Pi collection has both a bench and a stool/side table with space for magazines. This is easy-to-reach storage for those who have trouble bending down toward the floor, where some other tables have their storage space. The one drawback I can see is that magazines might get shoved toward the back where they would be harder to see (and retrieve).

Umbra’s Magino stool, designed by Karim Rashid, has that close-to-the-floor storage space: fine for many people, but not those with trouble bending down that low. Because it’s clear acrylic, the top magazine on each side is visible; that’s nice for those who work best with storage that doesn’t hide things away.

The Collecteur from Christian Lessing, with its two powder coated steel pieces, has an adjustable height, going from 40 to 59 cm. The Collecteur has a removable cushion, so it can serve as a stool or an end table. One downside: As the stack of magazines grows, it might become increasingly hard for end users to pull out the ones they want. And thinner magazines without a spine won’t work very well in this type of piece.

The Woodieful Chair, which also serves as an end table, had a successful Kickstarter that got funded in May. The slots provide for magazine storage when it’s oriented as a table. 

The Woodieful can also store magazines when it’s being used as a chair. However, this piece would be a bit cumbersome to use for magazines if it was frequently re-oriented—changing between a chair and a table—as the magazines would need to be removed and replaced.

Tables designed to hold magazines often use slots in the top surface for this purpose. The acrylic Wave Table, a prototype from BEdesign, provides this type of storage. However, the very limited tabletop space would make this impractical for many people.

But the Wave Table has one notable feature: It can be turned on end, and seemingly still provide storage (on what would then be the side, not the top).

The Mag coffee table from Ali Sandifer provides a lot of tabletop space along with nice angled storage for a limited number of magazines. The angled approach helps keep magazines upright even if the storage space isn’t full.

The coffee table from Brigada would work for end users willing to trade some tabletop space for more magazine storage. The slots have varying depths, which would be nice for those whose periodicals aren’t a single size. But for others, the deepest slots may be a bit too deep for comfort.

Lots of freestanding magazine racks use a leather sling; Roderick Vos takes this design approach and incorporates it into a table. This design will annoy some end users because the magazines will not stand up straight and may tend to curl; others won’t mind that at all.

Another design approach involves using a rack that the magazines get placed over, as with the WF Magazine Side Table from Joshua Howe. End users who are in the midst of reading a magazine could keep their places, which some may appreciate. However, this design may be a bit hard on the magazine’s spine—a possible concern for those who intend to keep the magazines after they’ve been read.

The magazine coffee table from Kimba Hills would be good for end users who are very visual and want to readily see the magazines being stored.

The Paper Table from Ligne Roset, designed by Nathan Yong, is marketed as a magazine rack/occasional table, but it doesn’t look like a very practical table. It’s also less space-efficient with its storage than some other approaches, but it is another design that would work well for those who work best when they have everything within easy eyesight.

Levenger’s No-Room-for-a-Table Table uses the accompanying large basket to provide magazine storage that fits into narrow spaces. However, if there’s no space for end users to stand beside the table (so they can only access it from the front), it will be hard for them to see what’s in that basket; they’d have to pull it forward.


Core77

10 Coffee Tables Designed for Storage

A coffee table with storage is one way to make the most use of limited space, and there are many different ways to design that storage. The rectangular tables from Huppe’s MOVE collection—there are two of them in that photo—have inserts that provide storage. These would be good for larger Items like books; smaller items would get lost. 

Other designs provide for hidden rather than open storage, which helps keep the contents dust-free and provides an uncluttered look. Drawers are one obvious approach, as with the Delta coffee table from Tvilum

Team 7’s Lux coffee table uses a drawer that’s much shallower, which is perfect for end users who want to stash smaller items such as remote controls. There’s an open shelf below for larger items such as magazines and books.

But there are numerous other ways of providing storage space in a coffee table. VIG does it nicely with a swivel-top table, with compartments of various sizes to keep things organized.

The Turning Table from Menu, designed by Theresa Arns, uses a bolt and screw system to open and close the lid. With the reasonably shallow drawer, smaller items won’t get buried. The lack of internal dividers makes it harder to organize a bunch of smaller items (pens, for example) but also provides space for larger items (such as papers) that might not fit if there were dividers.

The Times 4 table from Polit, designed by Gonçalo Campos, segments the storage space into four sections and always has one one quarter of the storage space exposed. I can see a small child enjoying spinning this table around, so it wouldn’t work well for end users where that could cause a problem.

With West Elm’s storage coffee table, one side lifts up to provide access to the storage area. It’s not clear if there’s any mechanism to ensure a child’s fingers don’t get caught as the table top comes down; if not, this might not be the right table for some parents.

The Rian Gullwing coffee table from Semigood Design has flip up lids, mounted with gas springs. This wouldn’t be a good choice for end users who like to have things sitting out on their coffee tables, since the items would have to be removed every time the storage space was accessed.

While hidden storage has its advantages, some end users prefer visible storage. The Newton coffee table from Dovetail Furniture has three wire baskets which are removable—a nice touch.

The Tokyo Tribal collection from Industry+ includes a coffee table with a basket surrounding two of the legs. This seems like an awkward storage solution; the legs would interfere with storing some larger items, and bending down to get things from the basket would be difficult for some people. But it might store selected things just fine: a throw blanket and pet toys were the first two that came to my mind.


Core77

Grouphug Reminds Us That Design is About Much More Than Tables and Chairs

Each year during New York Design Week, designers from all over the world flock to the city, filling venues throughout the five boroughs with a seemingly endless array of new products. Don’t get us wrong, we love to see the full gamut of works on display, but there is something particularly refreshing about designers who opt to challenge the design world right in the middle of one of it’s most important annual exhibitions.

That’s why we’ve had our eye on Grouphug, an alternative design collective founded by the director of product design at littleBits, Krystal Persaud. Each year, the group stages a pop-up show during New York Design Week, each time tackling a different big-picture theme—probing “those problems that make you think ‘Man, the world is so fucked up,'” as they state on their website. Over the years, they’ve established a thought-provoking platform that lays an important foundation for generating discussions about the productive role of design in our society. On the eve of their exhibition opening this year, we sat down with Persaud to find out more about how Grouphug started, what motivates them and where they’re headed.  

Core77: When and how did Grouphug start?

Krystal Persaud: I moved to New York from Atlanta in the spring of 2013. NY Design Week came around and I remember going to a handful of events and feeling underwhelmed. It was embarrassing to see shows that have not evolved past furniture or lighting designs. I know that ICFF is a Design Week staple, but there are over 40,000 industrial designers in America—what’s everybody making? It can’t all be chairs and lamps. For New York to continue to be the most forward-thinking city in the world, we need more experimental, visionary work.

After 2013’s NYC Design Week, I thought, “I live in New York… I know some designers… why not try to organize a show I wish existed?” So in 2014, we hosted our first show, Trigger, about gun violence. This was followed by Feed Me in 2015, a show about the future of nutrition. Now we’re on our third show, Judge Me, about combatting prejudice.

One of the projects selected for this year’s show is Tru-Colour bandages, a new take on band-aids that redefines what “nude” means. 
 

How does the name “Grouphug” reflect the collective’s mission?

I never liked the nature of design competitions. Trying to design the “best” piece to win a spot in a show always pits designers against each other. When designing solutions for a big problem, it isn’t a competition. It’s more about bringing designers together and feeding off of each others’ ideas. So I liked the idea of this collective feeling like a “grouphug” of designers—a creative space where you submit an idea and are welcomed into a community of people who are also passionate about what you are trying to do.

It’s hard to find a name for a socially conscious mission without sounding mega cheesy like “design for good” or something like that. Whenever you have a name like “for good” or “for impact” it cues the eye roll… I wanted the name to emphasize a sense of joy and fun–to attract optimistic people!

Also on view is this Pantone-esque guide to human traits by Spark Corps.

What considerations go into choosing each year’s theme?

Every year during the exhibition we put out post-its and paper and ask visitors to tell us what big problems they care about or worry them. When forming a theme, we try to pick a topic that is broad enough that designers have some freedom to interpret it, yet specific enough that the final output can be tangible. For example, this year’s theme of “prejudice” is universal enough that it personally touches everyone, but they all have a different take on it. I think it’s important to give designers an avenue to act on things they are passionate about. We’ve talked about tackling themes like population, energy, and addiction in the future.

The GenderTimer app allows you to measure how much speaking time is given to women vs. men during tv shows or even in office meetings. 
 

What’s next for Grouphug?

Good question! We get a little bigger every year. We try to push designers out of their comfort zone and give them the opportunity to design things they don’t get to every day. Most of the concepts shown at our shows are prototypes that will never make it to market. That’s ok. We hope the process of tackling a big problem for a design show will inspire designers to continue thinking about theses issues in their professional lives as well. Success to me is building a tight-knit community of designers who are passionate, curious and ready to rumble.

We want to continue disrupting NYCxDesign with fresh ideas. We’ve talked about adding more interactive elements to our programming next year—like running a hands-on workshop or a design charrette around the theme we choose.


Core77

Misunderstanding Materials: Incorrect Reports That Apple Has Contracted the Production of 18-Foot-Long “Continuous, Seamless White Oak” Tables

We’re used to seeing Apple push the designs of their own physical products. What’s interesting is when they also have the capability to push the boundaries of design fields outside of their realm, as they presumably did with their forthcoming Norman-Foster-designed “Spaceship” campus. Now it’s come to light that there’s another industry, or at least company, that they’ve gotten to stretch the envelope: The furniture industry’s Dutch table manufacturer Arco.

As Design Milk reports, Apple contracted the company to produce 500 tables for their upcoming campus, in a staggering 18-foot length. That part is true. Also true is that the tables are both beautiful and quite the production feat to execute. What’s not true, at least judging by the photos, is that “These extra large Pod Island Tables by Arco are constructed from continuous sheets of solid Spesshart [sic] white oak sourced from the fairytale forests of Germany” and that they are comprised of “continuous, seamless white oak.”

We could forgive the “Spesshart” typo (Spessart refers to a wooded mountain range in Germany where the oak is being sourced from), but the “continuous” and “seamless” part, which other publications are now quoting and repeating as fact, is simply inaccurate. Take a look at the tabletops, and look closely at the photos:

The grain pattern indicates those are veneers of the flat variety (as opposed to, say, the distorted grain patterns you see in the spiral cut veneers used in plywood) and you can clearly see that they have been glued up, side grain to side grain. 

Again I say, these tables and Arco’s production results are beautiful, it is the reporting that is incorrect: These are no more “seamless” than a butcher-block table is seamless. The internet being what it is, you now have publications quoting the original article and reinterpreting that to mean the tabletops are created “from a single sheet of wood,” which is obviously not true, as you can see from the visible joints below.

The original article also states that “Arco devised a new technique to peel away very precise, thin layers off of single oak slabs, layering these continuous sheets into a seamless surface.” More detail would be nice here, so that we can understand exactly what is “new” about the technique; as described, it does Arco a disservice, as the sentence may as well be describing the production of common veneers. We also don’t see any slab-width veneers here. In the photos above and below you can see the striations of alternating strips. Lastly, the choice of the word “peel” is curious as it implies the spiral-cut method used for plywood, which is inconsistent with the grain patterns depicted. The pieces in these photos all appear to have been sawn:

It is possible that by using the words “seamless” and “continuous,” the original writer is referring to the fact that we can’t see any end-grain-to-end-grain joints. That Arco is able to produce 18-foot-long veneers without any end-butting is indeed impressive. But we are always surprised when layfolk miss simple details like where clearly different surfaces are joined together. There is also a claim that the tables are being transported in “capacious 40′ x 40′ shipping containers,” which would require a rather odd-looking truck to transport them.


Core77

Designs for Small Spaces: Transformable Coffee Tables

I still remember the first time I saw a transformable coffee table, about a dozen years ago in a friends’ home—a small place that definitely didn’t have room for both a coffee table and a dining table. Now I see clients who struggle with making everything fit in a small home, and dual-purpose furniture can really help. 

The Mascotte table from Calligaris, designed by Edi and Paolo Ciani, has a number of nice design features. The user just presses a button to select from one of seven heights—so it’s extremely easy to adjust, and quite flexible. The tabletop size can be doubled; there’s a butterfly opening mechanism for that. And the table has two scratch-resistant rubber wheels, so it’s easy to move around.

This video shows just how easy it is to adjust the Mascotte table. It can go from 42 cm to 74 cm (about 16.5 inches to 29 inches), which means it covers standard coffee table and dining table heights.

The mechanism for adjusting the height is obviously a key design decision for such tables. The Paris table from Compar is raised and lowered using a pump mechanism. 

Looking at this video, it seems the Paris table is easy to adjust, too—a smidgen more complex than the Marcotte, perhaps, but still no big deal.

The Lem adjustable table from Magis, which first came out in 1985, was designed by Andries and Hiroko van Onck. They explain how it works: “By unclasping a simple grip under the table top the Lem table height can be adjusted from a coffee table to a dining table…a steelspring is loaded when the table is pushed in the lower position…The three injection molded polycarbonate ‘feet’ include each two ball joints.” 

In 2012 the table was redesigned, changing the central joint of the legs, so it looks a bit different. 

Olsson & Gerthel, one of the many companies selling the table, explain that it’s raised or lowered by turning the tabletop. This would seem to indicate the table can be adjusted to any height the end user wants (within the table’s range of 43-73.5 cm), and some end users will appreciate that added flexibility.

Sedit makes a number of transformable tables where the tabletop rises up from the base. In some of those tables, such as the Piccolo, the table incorporates a bit of storage—always helpful in small spaces.

The Piccolo is another table that’s very easy to open and close, as the video illustrates. However, it’s also a table that’s limited to two heights. That will be fine for most end users, but others will miss the flexible height options that some other tables provide.

Other tables transform without any mechanical apparatus. One such table is the MK1 from Duffy London. This makes the adjustment a bit more complex—but I don’t think I’d have any trouble with this table, and I’m no good at such things. It converts with “two simple movements” per Duffy London, and I could handle that. Still, this wouldn’t be the table for certain end users with physical limitations. 

The M-Table from Oito takes a somewhat similar design approach, with legs that pivot to raise or lower the table.

The 3styletable is just what its name indicates; it can serve as a coffee table, a desk, or a dining table. This design requires the end user to reassemble five pieces into different configurations, making it a more complex transformation than most other such tables. It’s still not very difficult, but it might not be something the end user would want to do on a daily basis.

The height of the Vidun table from De Padova, designed by Vico Magistretti in 1987, is adjusted with the big wooden screw that forms the base. This particular table wouldn’t work so well as a coffee table, though, since it only goes from 63 cm to 80 cm (about 25 inches to 31.5 inches).


Core77