Tag Archives: suck

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

Eight Reasons Why Being Able to Fly Would Actually Suck

It’s a standard bar-room debate: “If you could have a superpower, what would it be?” The options offered are usually invisibility, flight and X-ray vision.

A lot of people pick the ability to fly. Well, those people are idiots. If you could fly it would be a disaster. Here’s why.

1. You’d Constantly Lose Things

Our pockets are designed to work with gravity: You drop stuff inside them and they sink to the bottom. But since people always fly horizontally, stuff is going to fall out of your pockets.

In a crowded city that’s dangerous; in a crowded and litigious city that’s disastrous. Best-case scenario is I lose my keys over Central Park and have to get them all replaced. Worst-case scenario is my iPhone falls out of my pocket over 5th Avenue, punches through the roof of a cab and breaks somebody’s arm. The cops unlock the phone and find my personal info. Next thing you know I’m being contacted by a law firm and being sued for damages.

2. It’s Cold Up There

Where I live in Manhattan, you can’t fly low or you’ll smack into traffic lights and tree branches. To get up above the buildings you need some altitude. Well, temperature drops 5.4 degrees Fahrenheit for every 1,000 feet of altitude. Then there’s the wind, which would increase in severity the faster you went. So during the winter, every time you wanted to fly you’d have to bundle up like you were going on an Arctic expedition. And you would probably lose a lot of hats because they would always be flying off of your head.

 

3. You Wouldn’t Be Able to See Well

The wind would be in your eyes all the time, particularly if you flew fast. If you wore glasses they’d just fly off. So you’d have to wear goggles with a headband and they’d have to be on tight. Bugs would still slam into them and obscure your vision. Plus when you arrived at work and took the goggles off, you’d have red circles around your eyes for like fifteen minutes, your hair would be messed up, there’d be bugs in your teeth and you’d just generally look like a mess.

 

4. Airborne Accidents are Worse than Earthbound Ones

At least once a week I’ll slam a shin into a coffee table or stub my toe. We’re all capable of klutzy, distracted behavior, and accidents would be way worse high up in the air. Let’s say I’m taking off from the sidewalk and still thinking about what I should have said to that jerk on the subway. So I’m distracted and I fly straight up into a street lamp and hit my head. Now I fall twenty feet back down to the street and break both of my legs.

5. You Can’t Carry Much

If you need to transport a lot of stuff on the subway, you can use a roller bag and schlep it up and down the steps. But if you’re flying you’re limited to a backpack. Backpacks are designed for upright use, where they harmlessly transfer weight to your shoulders and lower back. But in that horizontal flying position, all of the weight is going to be pressing directly against your spine. Even your MacBook Air and a couple of books are eventually going to send you to the chiropractor.

6. Landing Would be a Hassle

Let’s say I want to cross the East River from Manhattan to visit Brooklyn Heights. I can’t just touch down in the middle of Montague Street or I’m going to get hit by an Uber. So I have to find a stretch of sidewalk that’s not obscured from above by tree branches and I have to avoid pedestrians so I don’t land on somebody and get sued.

If I do manage to find an uncrowded spot and land, there’s going to be a commotion. People are not used to other people dropping out of the sky. They’ll point and panic, some will scream. Store owners will grab bats from underneath the counter. Cops will approach me with their hands on their holsters. Hordes of people will whip out their phones and start recording me. Imagine what a pain in the ass it’d be if that happened every time you climbed out of a subway station.

So you think, “Well, just land on a rooftop, where there’s no people.” Yeah? Then what, genius? I still need to get down to street level. Rooftop stairwell doors in New York City are always locked to prevent thieves getting into the building. Am I gonna fly from rooftop to rooftop trying to find one that’s unlocked? At that point it’d be faster for me to take the train.

7. Bird Strikes

Believe it or not, pigeons can do 50 miles per hour. If a semi truck is coming at you at 50 miles an hour, at least you can see the damn thing since it’s huge. Pigeons are tiny and hard to spot from far away. So let’s say I’m flying across the Hudson because I got tired of waiting for the ferry, I’m flying west at 50 m.p.h., a pigeon is flying east at 50 m.p.h. and we collide. That’s basically like I got shot in the chest with a pigeon going 100 m.p.h. If its beak shattering my sternum doesn’t kill me instantly, I’m still going to fall into the Hudson River where I will now drown.

8. You’ll Get Sick

If it’s raining out, you can’t fly with an umbrella, it’s simple aerodynamics. So anytime there’s precipitation and you want to take flight, you’re going to get soaked. Coupled with the colder air up there, you’re going to get sick constantly. You’ll be flying to the pharmacy a lot to stock up on Sudafed.

Also, if you’re carrying anything metal during a thunderstorm, there’s a good chance you’ll be struck by lightning. Then you will fall out of the sky. Afterwards the coroner will examine your smoking, shattered corpse to determine if you were killed by being electrocuted, by the impact of hitting the ground or by the blunt force trauma from the crosstown bus that then ran you over, like it makes any damned difference.

So yeah, being able to fly isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. And don’t even get me started on invisibility. Folks, you always choose X-ray vision, at least you do if you’re a designer. In the next post I’ll explain why.


Core77

Singer Porsche, Koenigsegg, NSX: Leno’s life doesn’t suck

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Jay Leno heads to The Quail during Monterey Car Week to chat with super car bigwigs like Christian von Koenigsegg and Rob Dickenson from Singer. He also takes a drive in a Mercedes-AMG GT S.

Continue reading Singer Porsche, Koenigsegg, NSX: Leno’s life doesn’t suck

Singer Porsche, Koenigsegg, NSX: Leno’s life doesn’t suck originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 05 Oct 2015 20:01:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Everyone Is Literally Crazy

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Everyone has their moments of insanity. The Internet has made that painfully obvious, as our moments of abstracted, often context-less, craziness are haphazardly posted and then, in some cases, amplified for all to see. Because of this dynamic, we’re also given endless opportunities to deconstruct the way in which someone else has come unhinged. To wit: The first thing we do in a national emergency and scandal? See if the suspect had a Twitter, Facebook or Myspace account — and then play comments-section psychologist. Or worse.

“We think of ourselves as sane and other people as crazy but really we are all a little crazy,” says BuzzFeed CEO Jonah Peretti, who will be giving the keynote speech at TechCrunch Disrupt. The talk will be about this exact topic, titled: “Everyone Is Literally Crazy,” like the headline of this post.

After the last two weeks, I can confirm that someone somewhere needs to shed some light on why everyone seems more wacko online. I’m looking at you, Amanda Bynes.

***Buy tickets to Jonah’s talk here.***

“We think of ourselves as having consistent interests but really we are capricious and what we like depends on context more than our own convictions,” Jonah explains. “This all becomes clear on the web because we can measure human behavior so carefully.”

The examples of the Internet exposing and archiving humanity’s darker psychological side keep pouring in: Just yesterday, Gawker posted this email from a sorority girl at the University of Maryland. The article, which garnered over 1.6 million pageviews, featured a Delta Gamma board member lambasting her sorority sisters for “LITERALLY being so fucking AWKWARD.”

Another great thing about the Internet is how often people misuse the word “literally.”

“If you just opened this like I told you to, tie yourself down to whatever chair you’re sitting in, because this email is going to be a rough fucking ride.

For those of you that have your heads stuck under rocks, which apparently is the majority of this chapter, we have been FUCKING UP in terms of night time events and general social interactions with Sigma Nu. I’ve been getting texts on texts about people LITERALLY being so fucking AWKWARD and so fucking BORING. If you’re reading this right now and saying to yourself “But oh em gee Rebecca, I’ve been having so much fun with my sisters this week!”, then punch yourself in the face right now so that I don’t have to fucking find you on campus to do it myself.
I do not give a flying fuck, and Sigma Nu does not give a flying fuck, about how much you fucking love to talk to your sisters. You have 361 days out of the fucking year to talk to sisters, and this week is NOT, I fucking repeat NOT ONE OF THEM. This week is about fostering relationships in the greek community, and that’s not fucking possible if you’re going to stand around and talk to each other and not our matchup. Newsflash you stupid cocks: FRATS DON’T LIKE BORING SORORITIES. Oh wait, DOUBLE FUCKING NEWSFLASH: SIGMA NU IS NOT GOING TO WANT TO HANG OUT WITH US IF WE FUCKING SUCK, which by the way in case you’re an idiot and need it spelled out for you, WE FUCKING SUCK SO FAR. This also applies to you little shits that have talked openly about post gaming at a different frat IN FRONT OF SIGMA NU BROTHERS. Are you people fucking retarded? That’s not a rhetorical question, I LITERALLY want you to email me back telling me if you’re mentally slow so I can make sure you don’t go to anymore night time events …”

(You can read the whole thing here. Nah, just kidding, that’s a link to the Disrupt Eventbrite page. Try here.)

My theory is that this email resonated with people not because it was super extreme, but because it reminded many of the more risky and out there stuff we’ve all done online when we think no one’s looking or even when, or because, people are. “Is it weird that I think this is a normal email?” joked TechCrunch writer Anthony Ha.

Behind every joke is a little bit of truth.

Because these social communication platforms are so new, people have no clue what’s appropriate. Even, and maybe especially, the people we’ve hired specifically for that purpose. We’re just letting it all sloppily hang out in some sort of human communication avalanche.

“We have content to feed our obsessive compulsive selves, our narcissistic selves, and our ADD selves,” Jonah says. “We have content we like to search for on Google where nobody is looking but different content we like to share on Facebook where everyone we know is looking. We are strange creatures and our behavior on the web is a window into our contradictory souls.”

Come watch Jonah speak about this at Disrupt New York next week. Plenty of other crazy people will be there, as well. Not the sorority girl, though. I wish.

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Everyone Is Literally Crazy