Tag Archives: student

A Bullied Student With Vitiligo Is Celebrating Learning To Love Her Skin By Turning It Into Art

A bullied student with vitiligo is celebrating learning to love her skin by turning it into art making a world map, flowers and even a Van Gogh painting. Ashley Soto, 21, from Orlando in Florida, USA, has found turning her white patches of skin into art has empowered her and helped her to embrace her vitiligo.

She was diagnosed with the condition that affects one percent of the worlds population, at the age of 12 when a porcelain spot appeared on her neck. Within a year, it had spread to 75% of her body in spots and patches.

After being asked if she had showered in bleach the teen hid her skin beneath long jumpers and jeans to avoid further ridicule. But now, shes turning her body into art by tracing her vitiligo, making a world map and a beautiful arrangement of flowers to Vincent van Goghs The Starry Night painting.

The designs can take up to three hours to paint and outline the melanin-free areas of her body, helping her to appreciate the beauty in her vitiligo. Here are some of the art pieces Ashleys made to celebrate and embrace her vitiligo from a world map to simply tracing her vitiligo and also Van Goghs Starry Night.










Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

A Bullied Student With Vitiligo Is Celebrating Learning To Love Her Skin By Turning It Into Art

A bullied student with vitiligo is celebrating learning to love her skin by turning it into art making a world map, flowers and even a Van Gogh painting. Ashley Soto, 21, from Orlando in Florida, USA, has found turning her white patches of skin into art has empowered her and helped her to embrace her vitiligo.

She was diagnosed with the condition that affects one percent of the worlds population, at the age of 12 when a porcelain spot appeared on her neck. Within a year, it had spread to 75% of her body in spots and patches.

After being asked if she had showered in bleach the teen hid her skin beneath long jumpers and jeans to avoid further ridicule. But now, shes turning her body into art by tracing her vitiligo, making a world map and a beautiful arrangement of flowers to Vincent van Goghs The Starry Night painting.

The designs can take up to three hours to paint and outline the melanin-free areas of her body, helping her to appreciate the beauty in her vitiligo. Here are some of the art pieces Ashleys made to celebrate and embrace her vitiligo from a world map to simply tracing her vitiligo and also Van Goghs Starry Night.










Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

A Bullied Student With Vitiligo Is Celebrating Learning To Love Her Skin By Turning It Into Art

A bullied student with vitiligo is celebrating learning to love her skin by turning it into art making a world map, flowers and even a Van Gogh painting. Ashley Soto, 21, from Orlando in Florida, USA, has found turning her white patches of skin into art has empowered her and helped her to embrace her vitiligo.

She was diagnosed with the condition that affects one percent of the worlds population, at the age of 12 when a porcelain spot appeared on her neck. Within a year, it had spread to 75% of her body in spots and patches.

After being asked if she had showered in bleach the teen hid her skin beneath long jumpers and jeans to avoid further ridicule. But now, shes turning her body into art by tracing her vitiligo, making a world map and a beautiful arrangement of flowers to Vincent van Goghs The Starry Night painting.

The designs can take up to three hours to paint and outline the melanin-free areas of her body, helping her to appreciate the beauty in her vitiligo. Here are some of the art pieces Ashleys made to celebrate and embrace her vitiligo from a world map to simply tracing her vitiligo and also Van Goghs Starry Night.










Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

A Bullied Student With Vitiligo Is Celebrating Learning To Love Her Skin By Turning It Into Art

A bullied student with vitiligo is celebrating learning to love her skin by turning it into art making a world map, flowers and even a Van Gogh painting. Ashley Soto, 21, from Orlando in Florida, USA, has found turning her white patches of skin into art has empowered her and helped her to embrace her vitiligo.

She was diagnosed with the condition that affects one percent of the worlds population, at the age of 12 when a porcelain spot appeared on her neck. Within a year, it had spread to 75% of her body in spots and patches.

After being asked if she had showered in bleach the teen hid her skin beneath long jumpers and jeans to avoid further ridicule. But now, shes turning her body into art by tracing her vitiligo, making a world map and a beautiful arrangement of flowers to Vincent van Goghs The Starry Night painting.

The designs can take up to three hours to paint and outline the melanin-free areas of her body, helping her to appreciate the beauty in her vitiligo. Here are some of the art pieces Ashleys made to celebrate and embrace her vitiligo from a world map to simply tracing her vitiligo and also Van Goghs Starry Night.










Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

SCAD’s Ambitious Multidisciplinary Student Collaboration Yields VR Film

When I was in design school, we ID students had little interaction with the other departments. Few of us ever visited the Architecture department, where the students all reportedly behaved like Colonel Kurtz from Apocalypse Now. But it might’ve been nice to have some creative crossover.

SCAD is a design school that does foster creative crossovers, creating multidisciplinary projects that harness the school’s various departments to create things greater than the sum of their parts. A recent course at their Collaborative Learning Center, for instance, involved students from multiple programs: Animation, Costume Design, Dramatic Writing, Film & Television, Motion Media Design, Sound Design, Themed Entertainment Design, Production Design, and Visual Effects, all collaborating on a single massive project.

That project was “Say it with Music,” a virtual reality film that debuted at this year’s Savannah Film Festival. Take a look behind the scenes and see what these students cooked up:

I like how they shot it all in one take, like Scorcese dong the club entry scene from GoodFellas. The project looks like it was a lot of fun—even if, it appears, there weren’t any ID students involved. Speaking of which, current ID students at SCAD or elsewhere: 

Does your school have collaborative interdepartmental projects? And if not, do you have any ideas for what those could be, and what departments they’d involve?


Core77

SCAD’s Ambitious Multidisciplinary Student Collaboration Yields VR Film

When I was in design school, we ID students had little interaction with the other departments. Few of us ever visited the Architecture department, where the students all reportedly behaved like Colonel Kurtz from Apocalypse Now. But it might’ve been nice to have some creative crossover.

SCAD is a design school that does foster creative crossovers, creating multidisciplinary projects that harness the school’s various departments to create things greater than the sum of their parts. A recent course at their Collaborative Learning Center, for instance, involved students from multiple programs: Animation, Costume Design, Dramatic Writing, Film & Television, Motion Media Design, Sound Design, Themed Entertainment Design, Production Design, and Visual Effects, all collaborating on a single massive project.

That project was “Say it with Music,” a virtual reality film that debuted at this year’s Savannah Film Festival. Take a look behind the scenes and see what these students cooked up:

I like how they shot it all in one take, like Scorcese dong the club entry scene from GoodFellas. The project looks like it was a lot of fun—even if, it appears, there weren’t any ID students involved. Speaking of which, current ID students at SCAD or elsewhere: 

Does your school have collaborative interdepartmental projects? And if not, do you have any ideas for what those could be, and what departments they’d involve?


Core77

“How to Be an Industrial Design Student” Parody

There’s a lot of ground to cover when majoring in Industrial Design, but if there’s one thing they don’t teach you…it’s how to explain, to students from other majors, just what the hell it is you do.

Thus a group of ID students at Arizona State University put together a video explaining “How to Be an Industrial Designer.” Did they explain it earnestly? Of course not, what fun would that be? Instead here are the tropes of ID student life:


Core77

Results from the Wanted Design Student Workshop 2016!

One of the annual highlights of New York’s Design Celebration, NYCxDesign, has always been WantedDesign’s Design School Workshop—which brings together students and mentors from all over the world to collaborate on intriguing design themes, materials and problem solving. “More a collaboration than a competition,” the event marks Wanted’s commitment to innovation and to education. Remarks co-founder Odile Hainault, “Since the beginning, the Design Schools Workshop has been very successful in promoting schools—fostering an international network between young designers, as well as initiating partnerships between schools and manufacturers.”

Adds co-founder Claire Pijoulat, “This year marks the fifth anniversary of the Design Schools Workshop, and this edition was so far the most challenging…but certainly the most exciting and successful!” 

The event took place from May 12th to 16th, comprised of 26 students from six U.S. and International design schools: Aalto University (Finland), Art Center College for Design (Pasadena), Centro (Mexico), ENSCI-Les Ateliers (France), Escuela de Communicacion Monica Herrera (El Salvador), and Pratt Institute (Brooklyn). The workshop was led by Matt Sindall, designer and teacher at the French school ENSCI-Les Ateliers, in conjunction with Oui Design, an initiative from the Cultural Services of the French Embassy. Students worked in a dedicated space in Industry City, Brooklyn, and presented their final work at WantedDesign’s exhibition space in Manhattan.

Here’s the design brief for “Playtime”:

Objects which have an element of playfulness imbued within them express qualities that generate an instant connectivity with the user. As children, we discover the world by playing. Touching, manipulating, apprehending, and constructing are all means of forming a tactile and social relationship within the world around us.

Matt Sindall adds that, “there are many ways that ‘playfulness’ can be found in design, where humor can be imbued within object. It could be present in the form or function, the assembly, playful use of color and texture, or the ‘detournement’ of an object. This quality within an object is synonymous with the human condition.” (Read the full interview of Matt Sindall by Core77 here.)

Matt Sindall, WantedDesign Design School Workshop lead 

This year featured professional materials and prototyping mentors for the students, which worked to great effect not only in connecting the participants with local artisans, but also in helping them to understand the real-world “pushback of materials” as teachable moments. And of course, the high fidelity of the finished models provided a pretty spectacular finale. (Wanted and its partners are currently exploring ways to show the work beyond its NYCxDesign display.)

The glass mentor was Leo Tocosky, glassmaker from Brooklyn Glass; The textile mentor was Elodie Blanchard, textile designer; and the wood mentor was Omar Muniz, cabinet maker at Industry City.

Jury from left to right: Allan Chochinov, Maz Zouhairi, Susan Szenasy

At the end of the workshop, the students presented their work in the Grimshaw Gallery at WantedDesign Manhattan, with a jury providing feedback and commentary on the work. Jury members were Susan Szenasy, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of Metropolis Magazine; Caroline Baumann, Director of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Museum; Maz Zouhairi, President and CEO of Lalique, North America, and Allan Chochinov, Partner and Editor-at-Large of Core77, and Founding Chair of SVA’s MFA in Products of Design program.

Below are descriptions of each of the projects, along with images and videos. Enjoy!

THE BULL

TEAM: MONTSERRAT PAZOS GUIZAR, BEHNIA RAHMATI, DARIO VIDAL, ROMAN WEILL FATIMA ZAFIE ZARZAR

The Bull is a piece of furniture—a dynamic bench that’s deliberately unstable, but a LOT of fun! Constructed of a simple rolling plank who’s underside sits in a slotted disk underneath, the design offers a kind of “playful danger” that was frankly irresistible. “Although it is silent as an object,” the team argues, “the rawness is seductive. It calls its observer to participate in the act of playing. The form is reduced to primary elements in order to bring the focus on the dynamic experience of the game.”

Indeed, the slim profile of the seating surface makes it appear as if it is flying in the air, while the geometry of the “stoppers” underneath provide a bit of assurance that it won’t fly away. “The massive wheel communicates between the player and the ground—providing support and guidance.” The team submits that “The Bull’s ultimate objective is to disseminate joy—both for participants and observers.” The jurors found the design enchanting and compelling in its form, having a good time trying it out—both solo and with a benchmate!

MAKE or BREAK

TEAM: ANA KAREN GARZAR RAMIREZ, KRISTA HUMPHREY, SOFIA MUNES MENDOZA, CLE´MENCE PAGNARD

Make or break is a game. With an homage to classic construction and puzzle games like Tip-It, Make or Break turns up the heat with much higher stakes: Players take turns adding glass and felt pieces further and further out on the structure’s limb, but if they fail, the glass elements will fall and shatter. “This game is for ‘real players,’ comments the team. “The kind of player that is not afraid of taking risks and facing real danger!” Jurors reactions ran the full spectrum—some found the piece a bit frightening and over-the-top, while others delighted in its transgressive approach to reimagining what game playing could be.

Make or Break video

PIX

TEAM: ALYSSA KUHNS, MARIANA LOAZIA, MIKE RITO, LINDA VANNI

Pix is an interactive and transformable modular panel system that serves as a space divider and acoustic element in open collaborative interior spaces. The system consists of two-sided felt modules that can be rotated around their axis. When the modules are turned, their color changes, transforming their atmosphere from neutral to vibrant to anything in between. Since the modules can also be configured to create patterns, the wall can be used as a visual communication tool in social spaces. Finally, the modules can positioned in “open” or “closed” orientations, modulating both airflow and transparency.

“The organic, soft, three-dimensional felt surface invites to touch, and therefore encourages play and interaction,” submits the group. “The module system integrates play into a functional object—designed for often-serious work environments where creativity and collaboration should be nurtured—such as co-working offices and university campuses.”

BULLE BULLE

TEAM: ANDREA GONZALEZ ARE´CHAGA BELLOT, MAXIME LOUIS, EMILY NYBURG, MARIA REGINA SERPAS CACERES, CHRISTINA VENSON

Bulle Bulle was one of the more arresting of the workshop results. “The objects explore the interaction of two materials: blown glass and wood,” the group observes. “Glass is a volatile material whose formation is fluid and less controlled, while wood is stiff, structured, and fairly easy to control. Their forced interaction creates a dialogue, leaving evidence of their contrasting natures.”

Indeed this was true. The group showed the process video of the Bulle Bulle stool coming together and the audience was mesmerized. Check it out below:

The designers argue that “the resultant forms are whimsical—puns on the materials. The stool seat in particular is unexpected and surprising because it is made from glass. Its creation and form reference childhood activities such as blowing bubbles with gum or inflating pool toys. The charred evidence of their interaction is left on the wood, allowing the user to understand and imagine how Bulle Bulle came to be.” Jurors reacted to the shear beauty and unexpected nature of the objects, though none were too quick to run up on the stage and attempt sitting. (The students were pretty eager though!)

BOB

TEAM: KEVIN NOE CIBRIAN AGRIETA, HELI JUUTI, CAROLINA MOYANO IZQUIERDO, PAUL REAMEY

Bob is a “whiskey wobbler”— a playful ceremonial object that people can interact with. Designed for mixing and serving all types of whiskey-based cocktails with a group of friends (at the event the students mixed scotch with ginger ale!), the object can be rolled around to stir, tilted down and back up to pour, and passed around however you’d like. And despite the wobble, the form was engineered to never lose its balance.

“The design for the movement is based on objects from childhood playthings such as seesaws and rocking horses,” submits the team, “and the form is largely defined by the physics of motion. The function stems from finding a middle ground between a Kiddush fountain and a shotski—the former used in religious ceremonies; the latter focused entirely on ‘the fun of the party.'” Jurors were enchanted with the form, the attention to the stopper and lid details, and the overall show business of the presentation.

MAGNIATE

TEAM: MARI LINDBERG, ARTURO NEUMAN, GABRIEL ANTONIO TUSSEL MIRA, ECE YILMAZ

Magniate is dinnerware set whose forms “comes to life” when used with a complementary cutlery set. The glass plates, bowls, and glasses are each double-walled—hollow to contain magnetized liquid (think ferofluid). When the cutlery—outfitted with magnets at their ends—approaches the glass, the liquid inside follows its movement.

“The form and function of Magniate reference the metaphysical nature of matter,” offers the group. “Items such as dining plates are usually perceived as ‘solid’, yet only a small fraction of the universe’s energy density is made up of actual ‘matter’. With these products, their nature shifts from stationary to organic when the substance inside interacts with the user. The magnetic energy between the inside and outside of the seemingly solid material is the essence of this fun and playful object—an intellectual item designed for reflection and recreation.”


Core77

Sea Bacon, Plant Drones, and a Whole Lot of Material Exploration: Student Shows at Milan Design Week 2016

An impressive characteristic of the student exhibitions at this year’s Milan Design Week were their sheer ambitiousness: with projects that went far beyond the normal fare, topics ranged from creating plastics out of completely natural sources to imagining how to satisfy our meat craving in a speculative post-meat world (hint: it involves seaweed). Some students decided to tackle more aesthetic and conceptual concerns while others turned to more political spheres to investigate just how far design can help to improve in areas of sustainability or even humanitarian efforts. The overall results were not only elegant, but also thought-provoking and inviting even for those not normally engaged in design-centric conversation circles. 

More from Core77’s coverage of Milan Design Week 2016!

Vestae by Creative Academy
The students of Creative Academy, the design school of the luxury goods group Richemont (their portfolio includes Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, Piaget and Montblanc), presented a capsule collection based on wellness in the stunning setting of the Albergo Diurno-designed bathhouse located at the subway entrance of Piazza Oberdan.
Photo credit: LinYee Yuan
Harenam by Yulia Kutuzova, Creative Academy
A modern version of a vintage shaving brush made of natural sponge and wood.
Photo credit: LinYee Yuan
Albergo Diurno
This historic bath house served Milanese customers from its opening in 1923 until it was closed in the 90s. The space was designed by architect Piero Portaluppi.
Photo credit: LinYee Yuan
Lyra by Manfredi Calamai of Creative Academy
The flaked soap contained in this brass and olive wood container is still made by boiling beef tallow. Made in collaboration with Valobra, a century-old soap maker based in Genoa.
Photo credit: LinYee Yuan
Hatria by Anthony Bouchot of Creative Academy
Made with sponges from the Adriatic sea, this “scarf” is intended for every day use in the bath.
Photo credit: LinYee Yuan
Spa Fashion by Creative Academy
The students designed contemporary robes for the baths using waffle cotton produced by Busatti, a Tuscan-based textile company manufacturing linen, wool, hemp and cotton fibers since 1842.
Photo credit: LinYee Yuan
Albergo Diurno
This historic bath house served Milanese customers from its opening in 1923 until it was closed in the 90s. The space was designed by architect Piero Portaluppi.
Photo credit: LinYee Yuan
Photo credit: LinYee Yuan
Medusae Project of HKU University of the Arts Utrecht
This project by Charlotte van Alem of HKU Design in the Netherlands aims to create an environmentally friendly material using collagen tissue from Medusae jellyfish, a sea species that has increased in population as a result of climate change.
Photo credit: Core77
Re-Collected by Hester de Wolff of HKU University of the Arts Utrecht
Another project from HKU Design, de Wolff collects natural materials for use in dyes to create awareness of different material histories.
Photo credit: Core77

View the full gallery here
Core77

Here’s Some Sweet German Craft/Design Student Work from Holz-Handwerk

As we mentioned in the post on German education, Germany has a robust network of specialized schools that are ready to turn Hauptschule grads into high-level craftspeople. Below are some of the schools, and their students’ work, that we saw on display at Holz-Handwerk. Apologies that not all of the work is attributed to the specific students; in several cases credit was not given.

Also, apologies if my translations of the school’s titles are not 100% accurate. To our German readers, I’d greatly appreciate it if you could 1) correct me, and 2) speak to your government about transforming your language into something more reasonable. Maybe set a limit on how long a word can be–what are you guys, allergic to the space bar? I bet your Scrabble boards are like three feet—sorry, one meter—square.

Akademie für Gestaltung der Handwerkskammer Münster

Academy of Design for the Chamber of Crafts at Münster

Fachschule Holztechnik & Gestaltung Hildesheim

Technical School of Wood Technology & Design at Hildesheim

Meisterschule Ebern für das Schreinerhandwerk

Ebern Master School for Carpentry

Meisterschule Ebern für das Schreinerhandwerk students Thomas Herres & Stefan Andritschke
Meisterschule Ebern für das Schreinerhandwerk students Thomas Herres & Stefan Andritschke
Meisterschule Ebern für das Schreinerhandwerk students Thomas Herres & Stefan Andritschke
Meisterschule Ebern für das Schreinerhandwerk students Thomas Herres & Stefan Andritschke
Meisterschule Ebern für das Schreinerhandwerk students Thomas Herres & Stefan Andritschke
Meisterschule Ebern für das Schreinerhandwerk students Thomas Herres & Stefan Andritschke
Meisterschule Ebern für das Schreinerhandwerk students Thomas Herres & Stefan Andritschke

Staatlichen Fachschule Rosenheim für Holztechnik

State School for Wood Technology at Rosenheim

Schulen für Holz und Gestaltung Garmisch-Partenkirchen

School for Wood & Design at Garmisch-Parterkirchen

Städtische Meisterschule für das Schreinerhandwerk München

Urban Master Carpenter Craft School at Munich

More from Core77’s coverage of this year’s Holz-Handwerk Show!


Core77

Don’t Try This at Home: Design Student DIYs His Own Invisalign Braces

Open sourcing as a result of the proliferation of digital fabrication may be a big part of the not-so-distant future, but there are still some possibilities that seem out of reach—that is until someone proves you wrong. One such example? New Jersey Institute of Technology student Amos Dudley.

You really have to hand it to this kid, he is 100% designer. After dissatisfaction with his own self image—more specifically his smile—he took it on himself to solve the problem: “I had an amazing realization last year. I wasn’t smiling, and it was because I was unhappy with my teeth. They weren’t awful, but they were crooked enough to make me self conscious…By avoiding smiling, I was dampening my own potential for spontaneous happiness!”

So what do you do when you’re a debt-ridden college student with no medical insurance and lots of fancy CAD equipment lying around? You rig your own braces of course. 

Here’s how Dudley did it although we don’t recommend trying this at home: 

After a fair amount of research on the formal process and ramifications for using plastic aligners as opposed to wire braces, he created a mold from plastic alginate (a standard procedure in dental offices).

Here’s where it gets truly DIY: “The method for making the casting was very simple— I put the mold upside down in a yogurt container, and then filled it with liquid Permastone. When it came out, I simply broke off the top to reveal the casting, and used a razor blade to smooth out the surrounding area.”

After laser scanning his Permastone cast, he 3d printed the form along with a riser to avoid draping at the teeth during the vacuum forming process. Finally, he vacuum formed the 3D printed cast using retainer plastic (in case you were worried he was using some standard, more toxic 3d printing plastic).  

There are obvious questions and concerns to be asked when someone pushes the limits of digital fabrication like this, but it also points to new possibilities and frontiers (if it works)—can 3D printing processes become so open source that advanced technologies like this could be easily used by DIYers or in remote areas? In the future, will we be digitally fabricating services we never even thought imaginable? Exactly how far can this movement reach?  

But of course, the final and most important question is: did these bootlegged braces get the job done? 

Holy hell, it worked.

For the full play by play on how he did it, visit Dudley’s site here


Core77

Who Knew? The Waterbed Was Invented by an Industrial Design Student Doing a Class Assignment

How awesome would it be to design, while still a student, the product that would set your entire future up?

In 1968 Charles Hall was an ID student at San Francisco State University. For his master’s project he was tasked with improving human comfort, and while he set out to create furniture, he didn’t start with beds. Here’s what happened:

A couple of key points here. One is the importance of research; had Hall not talked to all of those physical therapists and doctors, he might not have struck upon the water idea. 

The second thing to note is that Hall wisely patented the design relatively quickly.

Judging by the waterfront house seen in the video, Hall’s done pretty well for himself in the past 48 years. The “Alumni & Friends” section of SF State Magazine fills in some of the blanks:

His invention — [originally called] the “pleasure pit” — was an immediate hit with friends. After pitching the product to the nation’s big mattress manufacturers without luck, he began manufacturing them himself. “We made ’em and sold ’em and delivered ’em,” he says. His company, Innerspace Environments, eventually operated 32 retail stores in California.

Waterbeds, though popular, proved a tough way to make money, with patent infringements and competition from cheap imitators. Says Hall, “The public didn’t know what to look for. A $ 29 bag of water is not the same thing as a $ 500 bed with a frame, a safety liner and a heater.” Hall eventually won a $ 6 million lawsuit for patent infringement. But by then his patent had expired. The waterbed wave had peaked (in 1987 with 22 percent of the mattress market) and receded.

Hall subsequently launched a company that produces outdoor products, Basic Designs, and eventually sold it. Today he and business partner Clay Haller run Advanced Elements, a company that designs, manufactures and wholesales watersport products, like the inflatable kayak you saw in the video, to companies like REI and West Marine.

All in all, not a shabby way to start a career. ID students, choose your final projects wisely!


Core77

Student Captures What Happens When People Are Told They Are Beautiful

1

How would you react if someone told you that you’re beautiful? 18-year-old Shea Glover, a highschool student from Chicago, conducted a social experiment to find out.

2

She posed people in front of her camera and then told them

“I’m taking pictures of things I find beautiful.”

3
told-you-beautiful-video-shea-glover

The responses are touching. “I conducted an independent project which evidently turned into a social experiment regarding beauty,” Glover writes on YouTube. “I want to clarify that my intentions were not to get a reaction out of people. I was simply filming beauty and this is the result.”

4
5
6
7
8

h/t: bored panda, aplus


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Nohemi Gonzalez, Industrial Design Student at CSU, Killed in Paris Attacks

On Friday, as the horror unfolding in Paris began popping up on news outlets and social media, administrators at California State University Long Beach began to worry. “[We have] 18 students participating in international exchange programs in Paris,” they wrote in the News section of their website. “The university is in the process of connecting with each of our students to ensure his or her status and is monitoring the situation in Paris very closely.”

By Saturday the awful news had come in. Twenty-three-year-old student Nohemi Gonzalez, a CSULB Industrial Design major doing a semester abroad at Paris’ Strate Ecole de Design, was at La Belle Equipe bistro with friends when a black vehicle began spraying the venue with gunfire. While her friends were lucky enough to survive, Gonzalez was one of 19 people slaughtered on site.

On Sunday a vigil was held at CSU’s Student Union, where faculty, students and family shared words and memories of Gonzalez. As the L.A. Times reports,

“Nohemi was an absolute delight,” said David Teubner, a professor of design at Cal State Long Beach. “She was funny and warm and such a kind person…. She was involved in everything.”

A senior, Gonzalez had declared industrial design as her major, focusing on product development and production. In addition to her studies, she was a teaching assistant in the department and a shop technician, overseeing lower-division students on their design projects.

…”Nohemi was a very gifted student,” said Martin Herman, chairman of the design department. “Her spirit and enthusiasm infused the department in so many ways. She had an indescribably sweet spirit and imagination. It’s unbelievable that this could have happened.”

“She was a great person,” classmate Alex Schumacher told The Daily News. “She was always the last one to leave the shop. She would yell at you if you didn’t clean up your area. She’d always be the first person to help you as well. She was one of the hardest workers in our group.”

Just last month, Gonzalez posted good news on her Facebook page: She and ID student teammates Ana Ramirez, Kim Jarboe and Angela Marquez had won Second Place in the Student division of the Biomimicry Global Design Challenge for their Polli Snak, a seed-impregnated biodegradable food package design that can be grown into a plant post-use.

The Strate Ecole de Design will hold a service in Gonzalez’ memory tonight.

CSU reports that “[Design Department Chair Martin] Herman said faculty and staff of the department are having an emergency meeting to determine how to ‘most honorably remember Nohemi and how to deal with our own mourning and grief.'”

As a design blog we don’t know quite what to do in this situation. It’s not our place to comment on the larger political issues and the impact of events like these, which encompass far more than one person. Our job is to write about informative, interesting or inspirational goings-on in the design world, and now there is at least one less person who might have contributed to that world.

When someone passes away as a member of an educational institution, there are occasionally scholarship funds or facilities or rooms that are then named for that person. We don’t know what CSU and Gonzalez’ family will decide to do, but we think it would be amazing if, with their blessing, any unfinished projects of Gonzalez’ were shared with the community—and allowed to be brought to completion by her fellow designers, in her memory.

Rest in Peace, Nohemi.


Core77

Workspace Challenge Photo Contest, 2nd Place: Samantha Creeger, ID Student

Second place in our Workspace Challenge Photo Contest goes to ID student Samantha “Sammy” Creeger. Creeger reminds us of the depth of an ID education by showing us not one, but three workspaces, all of which your average ID student might be toiling in during the same day.

__________________________________________________________

My name is Sammy Creeger, and I am an Industrial Design student studying my senior year at Iowa State University. I hail from Minnesota—land of hotdish and scrapbooks, you betcha!

I decided to provide 3 different workshops, because it is important for me to gain fresh insight, knowledge, and creativity from many different places. My first workshop is in Firenze, Italy, where I am currently studying abroad this fall semester. This workshop consists of breathtaking views and the refreshing Tuscan air. I enjoy wandering the city and discovering hidden gems that I can also call my ‘workshop’ where I can ideate and sketch.

The second workshop is located on the Iowa State campus. I joined the Gaffer’s Guild last Spring and learned how to blow glass. Although it is a challenge for me, it is one my favorite workshops to enter. Learning this art has made me appreciate it that much more and has made me even more determined to create beautiful works of art.

The third workshop is what I consider my home—the ISU Industrial Design shop. This is where most of my blood, sweat, and tears are located (no joke). The picture provided shows the process of the last project I worked on in the Spring, which was a Street Luge. The luge was eventually finished and successfully raced down the hill reaching speeds over 30mph.

__________________________________________________________

Congratulations, Sammy! Please be on the lookout for an e-mail to claim your Joey Roth Woodblock!


Core77