Tag Archives: speed

If you define day cruising as equal parts sun and speed, choose Wallytender X

If you’re looking for a fast day cruiser or a quick superyacht guest shuttle, the Wallytender X fills both roles nicely. The 1200 horsepower top engine configuration has will scoot between island stops at 69 miles per hour.

The post If you define day cruising as equal parts sun and speed, choose Wallytender X appeared first on Digital Trends.

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The government has an unexpected ally in 68 mph truck speed limit push

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The proposed speed limit could save over $ 1 billion in fuel each year.

Continue reading The government has an unexpected ally in 68 mph truck speed limit push

The government has an unexpected ally in 68 mph truck speed limit push originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 26 Aug 2016 18:04:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sweden’s Smart Speed Bumps

If you think about it, it’s strange that cars are sold that vastly exceed speed limits. The highest speed limit anywhere in America is 85 m.p.h., yet we can freely purchase cars capable of doing double that amount. While governments could mandate that all cars come with speed governors, none are willing to take such a draconian step.

Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat. Top speed: 199 m.p.h.

Instead societies devise primitive, external methods to prevent people from speeding. Perhaps the most inefficient is the pursuit-ready policeman who must sit in an idling cruiser, manning a radar gun; that’s a waste of both manpower and resources, even if tickets bring in revenue. It would be better if people were simply motivated to not speed in the first place, rather than wasting everyone’s time and money with your average pull-over situation.

A Swedish company called Edeva has designed a better anti-speeding system. They designed the Actibump, a sort of smart speed bump:

The first Actibump was installed in Sweden in 2010 in Linköping, and they’ve since spread to Uppsala, Malmo and even the bridge linking Sweden with Denmark. I don’t doubt that it takes quite a bit of resources to install and maintain one of these, but on balance it’s got to be better than having the local police department throw a body and a cruiser at the problem.

As for how it is installed and maintained, the following video explains both, and allows us to see that the design is quite clever. The developers have carefully considered how to make it both easy and safe to maintain, and we see that the (horizontal) lowering/raising mechanism is accomplished by cams on a crankshaft, which can of course be rotated by a simple motor:

So why is this better than a far-cheaper “dumb” speed bump? In my mind, it’s because the Actibump leaves law-abiding drivers unmolested while only inconveniencing speeders. And if you think about where sets of “dumb” speed bumps are typically installed—say, school zones—it makes little sense that every vehicle that approaches between 9am and 2pm, when all of the students are safely inside the school grounds, must hit their brakes, accelerate, then hit their brakes for the next bump, et cetera. The Actibump collectively decreases wear and tear.

Via Digg


Core77

Sweden’s Smart Speed Bumps

If you think about it, it’s strange that cars are sold that vastly exceed speed limits. The highest speed limit anywhere in America is 85 m.p.h., yet we can freely purchase cars capable of doing double that amount. While governments could mandate that all cars come with speed governors, none are willing to take such a draconian step.

Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat. Top speed: 199 m.p.h.

Instead societies devise primitive, external methods to prevent people from speeding. Perhaps the most inefficient is the pursuit-ready policeman who must sit in an idling cruiser, manning a radar gun; that’s a waste of both manpower and resources, even if tickets bring in revenue. It would be better if people were simply motivated to not speed in the first place, rather than wasting everyone’s time and money with your average pull-over situation.

A Swedish company called Edeva has designed a better anti-speeding system. They designed the Actibump, a sort of smart speed bump:

The first Actibump was installed in Sweden in 2010 in Linköping, and they’ve since spread to Uppsala, Malmo and even the bridge linking Sweden with Denmark. I don’t doubt that it takes quite a bit of resources to install and maintain one of these, but on balance it’s got to be better than having the local police department throw a body and a cruiser at the problem.

As for how it is installed and maintained, the following video explains both, and allows us to see that the design is quite clever. The developers have carefully considered how to make it both easy and safe to maintain, and we see that the (horizontal) lowering/raising mechanism is accomplished by cams on a crankshaft, which can of course be rotated by a simple motor:

So why is this better than a far-cheaper “dumb” speed bump? In my mind, it’s because the Actibump leaves law-abiding drivers unmolested while only inconveniencing speeders. And if you think about where sets of “dumb” speed bumps are typically installed—say, school zones—it makes little sense that every vehicle that approaches between 9am and 2pm, when all of the students are safely inside the school grounds, must hit their brakes, accelerate, then hit their brakes for the next bump, et cetera. The Actibump collectively decreases wear and tear.

Via Digg


Core77

Fast Work: Italian Boss on Motorized Contraption Sprays Road Markings With Blazing Speed and Accuracy

At school there was always one person in the studio who was faster than everyone else. They blazed through projects with a marker, a Dremel or a coping saw so quickly that it was fun to watch, and you were in awe of their muscle memory.

And that’s the key: Muscle memory. Put in the hours, do something enough times and you can get fast at just about anything. It’s even more impressive when you’re wielding a tool most people have no experience with, like a motorized road line marker. Watch this road worker in Italy lay down lines and edges, including curved ones, with Ferrari-like speed:

I’ve seen self-propelled road marking machines, and riding-mower-style models with a seat, but I’d never seen this chariot variety before. I wonder if the operator hacked it together and/or modified it; you reckon it came out of the factory that fast?

The operator’s name, by the way, is Indrit Mema. He owns his own road-marking company, Segnalgrafica, in Cosio Valtellino in northern Italy. To give you a sense of how fast he’s moving in the video above, take a look at one of Segnalgrafica’s videos showing what looks to be a member of their JV squad:

I did manage to get a better look at Mema’s rig in this video. The chariot doesn’t look like a stock piece of equipment:

I freeze-framed it to get a look at the logo on the machine, but whomever graphic-designed this thing ought to be fired. What the hell does this look like it says to you?

“Somo?” “Spamc?” “Sscmo?” I was not able to find the company that produces this machine. The orange color of it is the same as that used by German manufacturer Hoffman‘s road marking machines, but I couldn’t find a model like this anywhere on their site.

Whether he purchased the machine as-is or hacked it up himself, Mema apparently has fun doing his job. As he told Italian periodical Corriere Della Sera, “Quando traccio le strisce bianche mi sento come quando ero un bimbo sui go kart.” (“When I paint the white stripes, I feel like when I was a kid on a go kart.”)


Core77

Bentley EXP 10 Speed 6 coming, but not before hotter CUV

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Bentley still wants the shapely EXP 10 Speed 6 concept to see production, but a high-performance coupe-like crossover based on the Bentayga could come first.

Continue reading Bentley EXP 10 Speed 6 coming, but not before hotter CUV

Bentley EXP 10 Speed 6 coming, but not before hotter CUV originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 29 Nov 2015 19:02:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Blazing Fast Rescue Action: Japanese Firefighter Tech Rope Speed Competition

There’s no country in the world that has lax firefighters, but in Japan, the prevalence of traditional wooden structures adds an element of increased urgency. And while some team members of a Japanese firefighting brigade are trying to put the fire out, other members have to climb and crawl into the burning structures to pull potentially unconscious victims out.

Rope plays a large role in Japanese rescue operations, and the amount of drilling they do with the stuff is evident in this “Japan Tech Rope Rescue Competition.”  The speed with which these guys move is nothing short of insane. Enjoy, and apologies in advance for the soundtrack:


Core77

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Report: Speed Network offices ransacked by naked intruder

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We’ll admit to been pretty irritated at the NASCAR-centric programming at Speed in the past, but never to the point of stripping down to our bare backsides and terrorizing the company’s offices.

That’s exactly what one unidentified man did early Monday morning in Charlotte, NC. Police responded shortly after the individual entered the building, and while he started by tearing papers off of the wall, he soon moved on to dumping trash cans and flinging trophies around. After realizing that law enforcement was on the scene, the man attempted to make a run for it.

Police quickly caught up with the perpetrator, however. It’s unclear if he’s facing charges for his sans-clothing antics. Listen, guy, we’re pretty sure there are better ways to tell Speed to bring back its WRC coverage.

Speed Network offices ransacked by naked intruder originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 11 Apr 2013 08:46:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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