Tag Archives: solar

Meet The Solar Egg, A Giant Golden Sauna Built In Luossabacken, Sweden

In response to a commission from Riksbyggen, Bigert & Bergström have created a sculptural chamber in the form of an egg-shaped sauna that has just been installed at Luossabacken in Kiruna, Sweden’s northernmost town.

More info: Bigert & Bergström

Kiruna is currently undergoing a radical transformation, which involves a gigantic move for the whole town. This is so that the mining company LKAB can extract more of the iron seam that cuts diagonally downwards beneath the town. The iron ore is and has been – ever since it first began to be extracted at the end of the 19th century – an important source of income for Sweden, and absolutely vital for the town of Kiruna. No mine, no town. But the breaking up and devastating transformation of the landscape, the environment and the architecture caused by the move are also sparking a lot of debate.

Solar Egg has been made as a social sculpture where local people and visitors to the town can meet and, for instance, discuss these challenges. In the arctic climate of Lapland the sauna occupies a key position, as a room for warmth and reflection. B&B have taken up this tradition and developed a sculptural symbol that prompts thoughts of rebirth and an incubator that nurtures conversation and exchanges of ideas. The project is a continuation of the artists strategy to incorporate the climate into the experience of the artwork which was initiated with the Climate Chambers in 1994.

The egg is made out of stainless golden mirror sheeting, its multifaceted form breaking up the surroundings that it reflects into a multiplicity of different mirror images. Landscape, mine, town, sky, sun and snow are here combined into a fragmented image that can evoke associations with the complexity spanned by today’s discussion about climate and sustainable community development. The egg’s interior has been formed out of wood, with the wall panels and floor decking made out of pine and the bench of aspen. In the centre of the egg stand the wood-heated, heart-shaped sauna stove made out of iron and stone. The temperature inside the egg varies between 75° and 85° Celsius.











DYT. Design is all around us.

Meet The Solar Egg, A Giant Golden Sauna Built In Luossabacken, Sweden

In response to a commission from Riksbyggen, Bigert & Bergström have created a sculptural chamber in the form of an egg-shaped sauna that has just been installed at Luossabacken in Kiruna, Sweden’s northernmost town.

More info: Bigert & Bergström

Kiruna is currently undergoing a radical transformation, which involves a gigantic move for the whole town. This is so that the mining company LKAB can extract more of the iron seam that cuts diagonally downwards beneath the town. The iron ore is and has been – ever since it first began to be extracted at the end of the 19th century – an important source of income for Sweden, and absolutely vital for the town of Kiruna. No mine, no town. But the breaking up and devastating transformation of the landscape, the environment and the architecture caused by the move are also sparking a lot of debate.

Solar Egg has been made as a social sculpture where local people and visitors to the town can meet and, for instance, discuss these challenges. In the arctic climate of Lapland the sauna occupies a key position, as a room for warmth and reflection. B&B have taken up this tradition and developed a sculptural symbol that prompts thoughts of rebirth and an incubator that nurtures conversation and exchanges of ideas. The project is a continuation of the artists strategy to incorporate the climate into the experience of the artwork which was initiated with the Climate Chambers in 1994.

The egg is made out of stainless golden mirror sheeting, its multifaceted form breaking up the surroundings that it reflects into a multiplicity of different mirror images. Landscape, mine, town, sky, sun and snow are here combined into a fragmented image that can evoke associations with the complexity spanned by today’s discussion about climate and sustainable community development. The egg’s interior has been formed out of wood, with the wall panels and floor decking made out of pine and the bench of aspen. In the centre of the egg stand the wood-heated, heart-shaped sauna stove made out of iron and stone. The temperature inside the egg varies between 75° and 85° Celsius.











DYT. Design is all around us.

Tesla Gigafactory to get world’s largest rooftop solar array

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Touring investors got insights into the Gigafactory’s inner workings.

Continue reading Tesla Gigafactory to get world’s largest rooftop solar array

Tesla Gigafactory to get world’s largest rooftop solar array originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 13 Jan 2017 17:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Recharge Wrap-up: Tesla Model 3 solar roof option likely, Zipcar offers free cars on election night

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Musk says there’ll “probably” be a solar roof option for the Model 3. Zipcar wants to help users vote. 90% of Nissan Leaf owners live in “No Charge To Charge” cities.

Continue reading Recharge Wrap-up: Tesla Model 3 solar roof option likely, Zipcar offers free cars on election night

Recharge Wrap-up: Tesla Model 3 solar roof option likely, Zipcar offers free cars on election night originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 06 Nov 2016 13:27:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Recharge Wrap-up: Tesla Model 3 solar roof option likely, Zipcar offers free cars on election night

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Musk says there’ll “probably” be a solar roof option for the Model 3. Zipcar wants to help users vote. 90% of Nissan Leaf owners live in “No Charge To Charge” cities.

Continue reading Recharge Wrap-up: Tesla Model 3 solar roof option likely, Zipcar offers free cars on election night

Recharge Wrap-up: Tesla Model 3 solar roof option likely, Zipcar offers free cars on election night originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 06 Nov 2016 13:27:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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In Case You Missed It, Here’s What Yesterday’s Solar Eclipse Looked Like

Yesterday our planet experienced a solar eclipse, that odd phenomenon where the sun, the moon and the Earth are lined up as if the sun is a cue ball, the moon is the eight-ball and Earth is the pocket.

As scientists have explained, the rare event only occurs when Earthlings have paid ample fealty to the sun god through sacrifice, tribute or by performing certain types of rhythmic dances. Citizens of Indonesia and Micronesia were apparently the most pious this time around, as they were treated to a view of a total eclipse; Australia and parts of Southeast Asia only rated a partial eclipse due to their lackluster, half-assed worshipping.

Folks gathered at locations around the world to watch the event, either in-person or via video feed. NASA, setting up camp on an atoll in Micronesia, unsurprisingly captured the best footage and had the best camera gear. So if you missed it, here’s their recording of the four-minute event:

(Those moments when the sun suddenly flickers brighter or darker are presumably not natural; I imagine the cameraman was stopping the lens up and down.)

As you saw and heard in the video, many observers spotted the tall, reddish protrusion near the 11 o’clock position of the sun. While the NASA narrator keeps referring to this as a Corona, it seems highly implausible that a beer company would be able to launch and land a bottle that large onto the surface of the sun. Just goes to show you that those folks over at NASA aren’t as smart as they make themselves out to be.


Core77

Video Visualizations: If the Solar System’s Planets Were Closer to Earth

What happens when an astronomy enthusiast develops Autodesk 3ds Max skills? YouTube user Yeti Dynamics uses the program to create solar system “What if’s,” depicting what our sky would look like with alternate planetary configurations. First up, here’s his visualization of some of the planets fancifully relocated to be the same distance as our moon:

This is what the same might look like at night, and here he’s given one of Saturn’s moons a more terrifying orbit:

Now we all know that if the planets were actually that close to us, it would spell our doom; the reduced distance would make it much easier for the aliens living on those planets to reach us, and once they landed, their frantic pyramid-building would use up all of our resources. (Also, something about the tides, radiation and volcanoes.)

Our moon, on the other hand, does not have any aliens. Because we eradicated them during the secret second and third moon landings in 1974 and 1985. Anyways here’s what the moon would look like if it was the same distance away as the International Space Station:

So, is the science accurate? “Everything is correctly scaled,” claims Yeti Dynamics, though he cedes that “the Axial tilts are not particularly accurate.”

Not helping his scientific credibility is this example of what happens when, we assume, you import the wrong file into your visualization:


Core77

Researchers Discover New Planet—in OUR Solar System

In 2005, space nerds everywhere were disappointed when Pluto was ruled a non-planet. Scientific bodies deemed it too small to qualify; you can see its scale versus Earth below, in this exclusive image obtained by Core77.

In his most audacious escape attempt yet, notorious drug lord El Chapo Guzman engineered a tractor beam to pull Pluto and one of its moons into low-Earth orbit above the Mexican prison where he was being held. Guzman was in the process of building a tunnel to Pluto when he was foiled by British actor Sean Bean.

Now, however, researchers at the California Institute of Technology have deduced that we do in fact have a ninth planet in our solar system, and it’s about ten times the mass of Earth. (Or, as schoolchildren will delight in repeating, roughly the size of Uranus.) The reason “Planet Nine,” as they’ve cleverly named it, took so long to discover is partly because astronomers are lazy and primarily because this previously-unknown planet occupies “a bizarre, highly elongated orbit in the outer solar system” that is not co-planar with the orbits of the other eight planets.

As you can see by the rendering, the newly-discovered planet is…round

The thing is, no one’s actually seen this drunkenly-orbiting planet yet. The Caltech researchers deduced its existence by studying six objects in the Kuiper Belt, a gathering of non-planetary bodies spinning around beyond Neptune; unable to explain their trajectories, they began figuring out what types of nearby bodies would or wouldn’t cause them to move that way. According to Phys.org,

That left them with the idea of a planet. Their first instinct was to run simulations involving a planet in a distant orbit that encircled the orbits of the six Kuiper Belt objects, acting like a giant lasso to wrangle them into their alignment. [Researcher Konstantin] Batygin says that almost works but does not provide the observed eccentricities precisely. “Close, but no cigar,” he says.

Then, effectively by accident, Batygin and [fellow researcher Mike] Brown noticed that if they ran their simulations with a massive planet in an anti-aligned orbit—an orbit in which the planet’s closest approach to the sun, or perihelion, is 180 degrees across from the perihelion of all the other objects and known planets—the distant Kuiper Belt objects in the simulation assumed the alignment that is actually observed.

Planet Nine being orbited by a bunch of passwords (and an unidentified, misspelled sedan)

“Your natural response is ‘This orbital geometry can’t be right. This can’t be stable over the long term because, after all, this would cause the planet and these objects to meet and eventually collide,'” says Batygin. But through a mechanism known as mean-motion resonance, the anti-aligned orbit of the ninth planet actually prevents the Kuiper Belt objects from colliding with it and keeps them aligned.

Batygin and Brown have released their findings in an Astronomical Journal article entitled “Evidence for a Distant Giant Planet in the Solar System.” Their hope is that they, or others who read the paper and have access to telescopes, will eventually spot Planet Nine, as they’ve cleverly named it.

I’m not sure if this is relevant to the discovery or just an image of a Mac screensaver

Getting eyes on Planet Nine will be of supreme importance, and I hope Earth’s governments will collaborate to find it. As we all learned last month, having unobserved planets floating around out there can be one of the greatest dangers to the galaxy.

R.I.P. Hosnian System


Core77

Image algae-powered-biq-house-by-arup-2.jpg

Inhabitat’s Week in Green: algae-powered building, ionic wind thrusters and 3D-textured solar cells

Each week our friends at Inhabitat recap the week’s most interesting green developments and clean tech news for us — it’s the Week in Green.

DNP Inhabitat's Week in Green TKTKTK

This week, Inhabitat reported that the world’s first algae-powered building officially opened its doors in Hamburg. It’s called the BIQ House and it features an impressive bio-adaptive algae facade that controls day lighting while generating a steady stream of renewable energy. It makes sense that the self-sufficient building is located in Germany; the European country is leading the way in clean tech. Despite ditching its nuclear power plants, Germany has quadrupled its energy production in the past two years, largely due to its rapidly growing alternative energy portfolio. Not to be outdone, England just flipped the switch on the world’s largest wind farm, and in Paris, Schneider Electric set up kinetic energy-harvesting tiles that generate power from runners in the Paris Marathon. Meanwhile at the International Space Station, astronauts are installing a new type of 3D-textured solar cell that will soak up 16 sunrises every day.

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Inhabitat’s Week in Green: algae-powered building, ionic wind thrusters and 3D-textured solar cells