Tag Archives: reality

Microsoft’s mixed reality strategy seems stalled, but is it all part of the plan?

Microsoft’s mixed reality initiative has slowed down lately, with HoloLens pushed off until 2019, and Windows Mixed Reality headsets nowhere to be seen. Should Microsoft be worried?

The post Microsoft’s mixed reality strategy seems stalled, but is it all part of the plan? appeared first on Digital Trends.

Digital Trends

Design Job: Translate The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s Vibrant Mission into Reality as their Designer

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art’s award-winning design team is seeking an inspired and versatile designer to engage our audiences through visually rich and compelling visual graphics for the 3D environment, digital platforms, and print. This position is a member of a design team that plays an instrumental role in translating the vision of our expanded institution into a vibrant and cohesive brand.

View the full design job here
Core77

This Dad Turns His 6-Year-Old Son’s Drawings Into Reality

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Dom is six and he likes to draw. He even has his own Instagram account where he puts all his favorite pictures. But that’s not the end of the story, because once he’s finished with his mini masterpieces, his dad then recreates their real world counterparts with a dose of digital magic and a little bit of humor.

More info: Instagram (h/t: boredpanda, sadanduseless)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

This Dad Turns His 6-Year-Old Son’s Drawings Into Reality

1

Dom is six and he likes to draw. He even has his own Instagram account where he puts all his favorite pictures. But that’s not the end of the story, because once he’s finished with his mini masterpieces, his dad then recreates their real world counterparts with a dose of digital magic and a little bit of humor.

More info: Instagram (h/t: boredpanda, sadanduseless)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

A Look at Flat-Packed Dinosaurs, Virtual Reality Meditation and the Making of a Luxury Candle 

An enormous global community enabling the creation of over 100,000 projects in the past six years, Kickstarter brings people together and brings projects to life. Earlier this month, the organization held their first annual day-long summer festival, celebrating all types of creators and innovators.

From virtual meditation to flat-pack dinosaurs and luxury candles, check out a roundup of the talent showcased at the vibrant festival:

Splyt Light

A tool to design DIY fixtures, Splyt Light is a kit of sockets and connectors that allows the creation of custom lighting. Inspired by hardware store y-connectors, the shapes are refined into matte plastic modules that can be combined into countless forms. In addition to a wall with the illuminated y-connectors, Splyt Light showcased their endless connection possibilities with an outlandish light sculpture sitting on the steps of Kickstarter Festival.

Hybycozo

A laser-cut geometric light installation, Hybycozo’s intricate patterns lit up the night at Kickstarter Festival. While the goal of their Kickstarter campaign was to raise enough funds to construct a triambic icosahedron for this year’s Burning Man, the polyhedrons displayed at Kickstarter were much smaller and less interactive than anticipated. Nonetheless, Hybycozo’s dazzling, golden, faceted shapes were an attractive addition to the festival.

Keap

A luxury candle at an affordable price, Brooklyn start-up Keap is on an admirable mission. In the process of becoming a certified B-Corp and striving for sustainability through 30% recycled and reusable glass packaging, slow-burning all natural wax, lead-free wicks and avoiding adhesives all together, Keap is unlike any other candle maker on the market. Having already reached notable success since reaching their Kickstarter goal in November of 2015, Keap made a return to the Kickstarter community to lead a candle making workshop at the Kickstarter Festival.

Boneyard Pets

Created by 32 Square, a design and fabrication shop founded on the idea of maximum production with minimum waste, Boneyard Pets is a fun three dimensional skeletal puzzle. Made of Komatex, a brand of PVC, the flat-packed dinosaurs are ready to assemble using interlocking joints that eliminate the need for adhesive. After an interactive day of puzzle solving fun and showing visitors Boneyard Pets’ endless mutant-dinosaur possibilities, the group displayed the skeletons around the grounds and in the trees, allowing the dinosaurs to appear as if they’re running into the night.

Photo Credit: Boneyard Pets

SoundSelf

Virtual reality is usually associated with doing things in an artificial reality, but SoundSelf’s use of virtual reality is more about not doing. Unlike most video games, this VR meditation has no end goal. The voice controlled experience generates mesmerizing sounds and visuals that are said to induce a hypnotic state. While the SoundSelf booth did not provide much for onlookers, those who had a chance to play the hour-long innovative “game” had quite the indescribable experience.


Core77

Elaborate Virtual Reality Irish Pub Prank

Japanese variety shows are the king of staging elaborate pranks, but this digital creative agency in Georgia is giving them a run for their money. Leavingstone, in the capital of Tbilisi, was recently tasked with promoting tourism to Ireland (or a local beer brand called “Old Irish,” which I’ve never heard of) and came up with this plan: Accost passersby in a public square, and have them wear VR goggles that immerse them in 360-degree footage of Ireland.

Sounds simple, but the producers figured out a way to take it to the next level, in a way that really screws with people’s perceptions of time and space:

The details of the execution are quite clever. Notice, for instance, that they have the target standing on a box that the set then slots around. And I assume the noise and rumbling of the set being moved into place are disguised by whatever’s coming through the headphones and goggles, i.e. the running horses scene.

So: You reckon it’s real, or staged?

Thanks Jaysun!


Core77

The 2017 Acura NSX reality check

Filed under: ,

After 10 years of playing around with different designs and drivetrains the new NSX is finally in production. Was all of that time and engineering worth the payoff?

Continue reading The 2017 Acura NSX reality check

The 2017 Acura NSX reality check originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 14 Jun 2016 16:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog

‘Hyper-Reality': A Provocative Glimpse into an Augmented Reality Future 

We’ve been following the work of critical designer and filmmaker Keiichi Matsuda since we first caught a glimpse of a both entrancing and disturbing film he produced for his Master of Architecture in 2010. The short POV clip (which went on to rack up over 650,000 views on Vimeo) transports viewers to a near future world where augmented reality (presumably delivered through some form of technology infused contact lenses) is a very constant and slightly tyrannical layer on top of everyday life.

Fast forward six years via a successfully funded Kickstarter campaign (and undoubtably many, many hours of After-Effects)—Keiichi and team have just released onto the world an all new concept film that dives deeper into speculating what a future living with augmented reality might mean for us.

Kickstarter backers were of course rightfully first to set eyes on the ‘provocative and kaleidoscopic’ short film but Keiichi kindly invited us along to the films premiere screening and Q&A in central London last night. The full video has now been made available to watch on Vimeo and the project’s homepage.

Like all good speculative visions of the future, Hyper-Reality doesn’t shy away from grappling with the complexities and interrelation of technological trends—weaving in hints to themes as diverse as gamification, advertisement overload, personal development, personal promotion, service rating, chatbots, cyber-crime and even existential Googling. The depth and detail of the fiction being both a pleasure and pretty troubling to behold.

As Matsuda pointed out following the screening in London, the film set in a future Medellín city in Colombia (the Akihabara styling, which Keiichi attributes to his part Japanese upbringing, hinting towards a future blending of cultures) with the protagonist being a lower middle-class woman who relies on, what he imagines, what a ‘freemium’ augmented reality service might look like—hence the constant visual and bombardment of consumer advertising. 

Having spent years imaging and designing the details of this future world, Keiichi revealed he now has ambitions to turn the piece into a trilogy, with the next film showing the world through the augmented eyes of a premium user, and a third exploring the life of a hacker-type user. Interestingly, Keiichi also tells he is currently working with a start up to develop some of the gestural interfaces he imagined in the film—giving rise to the interesting possibility that he may be the designer as well as the critiquer of parts of his dystopian vision. Having thought about it for so long and hard however, perhaps we can hope that our lives future UX is safe in his hands?

Games of the AR future look much better at blocking out the noise of public transport
Ad overload on Columbian bus
Ugh. I can totally imagine supermarkets using some weird AR Tamagotchi to make use by more crap. Damn you supermarkets.
When will the Catholic Church get in on the AR and gamification game?!
Intimate and sophisticated screening at Bulgari Hotel in London’s Knightsbrigde
Creator Keiichi Matsuda introducing the short film
Swap to unlock Catholicisim ROFL 😀


Core77

View-Master Viewer DLX: Virtual Reality that Doesn’t Click

With hotly anticipated entries like the virtual reality Oculus Rift headset dropping for consumers at the end of this month, and Microsoft’s Hololens augmented reality hardware available to developers around the same time, this spring makes for as clear of a starting line as we’ve seen in the race for imaginary-space.

Google’s effort in this field is the C77DA Winning Google Cardboard, which has already made gains with real world audiences through a mix of affordable headsets which utilize mobile phones as the display screen and now-available apps. The recent news of note in their ecosystem, other than the Happy Meal headset (!!!), is the launch of the View-Master Viewer DLX, an upgraded version of the VR View-Master toy which Mattel announced last year. 

The new View-Master has an appealing story: it is a seemingly natural evolution of an iconic toy, realizing both in technology and form the futurism of the era of its inception, all while maintaining its nostalgic color palette and basic interaction model. It has emerged, however well considered, in the shadow of the original View-Master, a toy, possibly the only toy, which sits in the pantheon of singular product experiences. Its layers of sensorial and cognitive enjoyment are revelatory and profound. That may sound grandiose but at one point, this single product enterprise had 65% of the global population recognizing its brand. So though it really is unfair, let’s measure up the descendant by breaking down the progenitor…

The View-Master’s defining experiential components are (in our humble opinion, please hit the comment section with your own):

Physical
– The action and sound of the lever pull
– The manipulation, insertion, movement and errors of the disc
– The orientation of it to oneself and tilting to use it

Metaphysical
– The disc’s physical harmony with classical children’s narratives: progression, being finite, looping
– The exciting dialectic and dependency of coded artifact and deciphering tool
– The play between the simulation of and abstraction of reality

Of these the new View-Master preserves only the last of each list. Is that enough to give it the cultural significance of its forebear? Already there is a quite similar set of real-world physical ticks marking our use of VR; principally moving us as we move it, but also cocooning and masking us. And yes, as was the case with the diorama-aesthetic that grew to define the View-Master disc as a medium, there is a widely recognizable set of visual tropes in our electronic virtual worlds—the character glitches, connection-error stuttering of action or uncanny valley strangeness. But neither of these clusters of pop-culture reference material are unique to the View Master or to Google Cardboard, they apply to our experience of virtual and augmented reality as a whole. If there is a significance to be found that is specific to the new View-Masters, it is that the brand’s history and the disc models’ wide use has made them a very natural, and accessible, bridge between VR and consumers at an important time.

Image credit: Twitter @Jeff Faust

Legacy is certainly harnessed to that end; the product design of the DLX continues to develop the retro aspects of the first VR version, the chief one, the red plastic, has moved to the face of the unit and turned translucent. The vestigial lever continues a slow morph to a button. The overall finish level can be expected to be as smooth and flawless as one would expect of a mass-produced artifact. That clean machine-tooled look and sealed construction was always a part of the object, but receded far behind the above mentioned attributes. Without the experiential foundation the View-Master Viewer DLX is reduced to a styling exercise for something which is essentially just a handle for your phone — a haptic theme.

The genius of the original Google Cardboard viewer and, dare I say it, even the Happy Meal viewer, is that it accepts and fits its role. While McDonalds’ execution does incorporate a meaningful lesson in repurposing, Google’s nears the metaphysical qualities of the original View-Master. Google Cardboard, in its DIY-assembly, disposable, rough-touch material and overall humble supporting-role aesthetic subtly reminds us of systems vs. objects, of the transient qualities of experience and of our own agency in constructing narratives; whether real, augmented or virtual.

The DLX View-Master has made progression on the tricky transition it began last year. The re-orientation towards VR, the new logo, the product design and the collage work on its packaging; they are all very well considered and maintain, on the surface, View-Master’s legacy of wonder. But the DLX fails to embrace its new role, instead stretching to preserve the vestigial disc-viewer duality while missing the opportunity to develop a meaningful relationship to its new medium.


Core77

Will Porn Finally Make Virtual Reality Popular?

Virtual Reality is well-established in the cultural consciousness thanks to generations of sci-fi but it’s taken ages for the technology to get traction IRL. Thanks to recent leaps in affordability and portability, content producers are taking the intimate immersive tech to its only natural conclusion: using it to look at people doing sex. Now what once sounded like a ’90s nerd fantasy or deep web specialty interest may change the way all kinds of consumers interact with their media, and themselves.

The popularity of Oculus Rift is still rocketing, Sony and HTC are going hard on their own VR headsets, and since most of us carry tiny video machines in our pockets, options like Google Cardboard make the bar for entry to Virtual Realities surprisingly low. With investors like Google and Microsoft taking the platform seriously it’s harder to write it off as a fad, but what we’ll actually use VR for in the future is unclear even to early adopters. This is a big reason the porn industry’s interest in it is interesting.

I’m like a beautiful stallion!

Porn has been known to make or break media platforms. When porn producers backed VHS over Betamax, it stuck. Ditto with Blu-ray. Even the advent of cable TV had smut-makers to thank for its pay-worthy content. No matter how you feel about it politically, porn is a massive and innovative industry. When adult media companies start to invest time and energy in a certain new medium, it’s a bid of confidence. And when a traditional porn company dedicates all of its production to the new platform, it’s worth taking note. As of now, dozens of companies are producing VR content on a regular basis, and several have been for years—Barcelona’s BaDoink has gone fully VR.

Reporters tried out this racy new content at this year’s CES and the AVN Expo, to generally positive results. Among the normally optimistic but cautious tech talk there were mentions about how “visceral” and “crazy realistic” it is, how it’s the “obvious future” of the industry, and that “porn will never be the same.” Most popular were the first-person POV videos, where you take on the view and body of an actual porn star for the duration of a scene. For many, the feeling of inhabiting another person’s body in a hyper-real, intimate, explicit and human-scale scene was startling… then intriguing. Not only is the content just plain bigger than on a standard computer screen, you get the sensation of having a new porn-ready body (abs, boobs, whatever you choose) as it’s put to professional use.

Man, I’d look good with boobs.

The VR porn out there now is both traditional and high-tech. HoloGirlsVR offers 180 degree Point of View options with real actors and companies like Holodexxx are offering 360 degree environments and customizable CG characters. Big names like Naughty America and Kink are trialling production for both traditional, alternative, and kink content. There is enough being made that VR-specific content aggregators like VRSmash and SexLikeReal have sprung up online, and cater to multiple different viewing systems, and all kinds of viewers.

In them, the field of view is often limited, and in live-acted videos your movements don’t affect the action. But in the case of a sitting or prone viewer, this doesn’t seem distracting. Unlike in other VR applications, moving around to explore really isn’t the point with porn. Which isn’t to say exploration is unlikely. Because the only limit on who you can “be” is set by the content available, some viewers believe experiencing the POV of people of other genders or sexual orientations could have a humanizing effect you don’t get in standard porn. The intimacy of the view could even allow for more comfort in personal exploration in general.

Ladies watch porn too, go on brush ya browser off.

But will “normal” people buy a fancy headset just for porn? And does this mean the future of porn will be interactive? Not necessarily, on either count. Many big hitters in the tech world believe that passive media are on the rise in general, and that interactive gaming and entertainment will soon be eclipsed by individual viewing experiences. William Rhys Dekle, senior director at Microsoft Game Studios has said “I think that in the next 10 years, the major changes we will see will be different forms of passive entertainment.” Many professional futurists, like author Neil Stephenson (also a proponent of VR), share this view. Trends in the popularity of professional gaming as entertainment certainly support it. 

Other forward-looking tech folks think VR will be the thing to replace personal computing, or even smartphones. These claims are harder to sell, but sea change or not VR is estimated to be a $ 120 billion industry by 2020, and at least $ 20 billion is projected to come from porn.

So visionaries want our lives wrapped in VR, and VR porn wants us wrapped in new selves. Which wouldn’t necessarily be bad. As Will Fulton at Digital Trends noted, “In addition to opening up whole new avenues of kink, the ability to viscerally inhabit bodies unlike our own has compelling implications for how VR experiences could be used to cultivate empathy.” But not everyone is so optimistic. Like other types of porn, the VR version can be seen as an extremely isolating way of experiencing intimacy—literally cutting you off from the world around you, and can function to reinforce unrealistic norms around bodies and sex. At this stage it’s unclear whether or not a VR environment will intensify any of these existing concerns.

Sleek, inviting, sssexy.

The tech issues are simpler. The interface itself is still pretty encumbered. You wear a bulky blinding headset, use headphones, have to run a couple programs, stay clear of the corresponding wires, and download rather than stream your content. If the Kinect had issues getting buy-in because people didn’t want to look silly, will people be likely to don weird headgear just for an immersive erotic thrill? And speaking of that “immersive” experience, how will the sensory isolation relate to the desire for privacy? While it might be easier to hide what you’re currently looking at, it might be easier to get walked in on once you’re plugged in and going to town. Weirder looking sex toys exist, but as it stands streamlining will be helpful.

Visionaries want our lives wrapped in VR, and VR porn wants us wrapped in new selves.

Other technologies currently in development may make this kind of viewing experience even more compelling. Projects like Ultrahaptics are working on bringing haptic feedback and tactile sensation to VR. While it’s still in the works, results are suggesting that simulated physical sensations to compliment interactive visuals might not be too far off. Immersive porn you “act” in and can feel? That could get pretty intense.

How long until there’s VR porn of people using VR porn? 

If the concerns around isolation and self-consciousness are justified, the real/virtual blend of Augmented Reality might be the real goal, rather than full Virtual Reality. The use of total environments in VR makes for a compelling escape, but projecting content into real life and surroundings can give viewers a greater sense of believability and control. Plus AR tech is well on its way. Anyone with Snapchat has seen trivial augmentation in action, Pokemon Go is gameifying it in a handheld capacity, and brands like Microsoft are exploring its potential with serious tools like the HoloLens. While reviled, Google Glass already proved how much visual input we can fit into tiny wearables. Could the future of porn be a blended experience bringing actors and scenes into “real” personal spaces? Maybe AR would make shared viewing feasible?

As the high-tech sex entertainment industry develops, it’ll be interesting to consider where the questions of good design come in. Is VR an intimacy tool that responds to the needs of users, or does its complexity detract from its value? Are we more likely to see VR (or AR) adopted through better wearables, or implants, or other environmental design… like the TV room in Farenheit 451? 

Are you turned off by the idea, or is this a step towards that jetpack/flying car/hoverboard/hot android you dream of?

This post is part of the Core77 Sex-tacular, our editorial series exploring the myriad ways that technology and design are shaping the future of intimacy and sex.


Core77

Will Porn Finally Make Virtual Reality Popular?

Virtual Reality is well-established in the cultural consciousness thanks to generations of sci-fi but it’s taken ages for the technology to get traction IRL. Thanks to recent leaps in affordability and portability, content producers are taking the intimate immersive tech to its only natural conclusion: using it to look at people doing sex. Now what once sounded like a ’90s nerd fantasy or deep web specialty interest may change the way all kinds of consumers interact with their media, and themselves.

The popularity of Oculus Rift is still rocketing, Sony and HTC are going hard on their own VR headsets, and since most of us carry tiny video machines in our pockets, options like Google Cardboard make the bar for entry to Virtual Realities surprisingly low. With investors like Google and Microsoft taking the platform seriously it’s harder to write it off as a fad, but what we’ll actually use VR for in the future is unclear even to early adopters. This is a big reason the porn industry’s interest in it is interesting.

I’m like a beautiful stallion!

Porn has been known to make or break media platforms. When porn producers backed VHS over Betamax, it stuck. Ditto with Blu-ray. Even the advent of cable TV had smut-makers to thank for its pay-worthy content. No matter how you feel about it politically, porn is a massive and innovative industry. When adult media companies start to invest time and energy in a certain new medium, it’s a bid of confidence. And when a traditional porn company dedicates all of its production to the new platform, it’s worth taking note. As of now, dozens of companies are producing VR content on a regular basis, and several have been for years—Barcelona’s BaDoink has gone fully VR.

Reporters tried out this racy new content at this year’s CES and the AVN Expo, to generally positive results. Among the normally optimistic but cautious tech talk there were mentions about how “visceral” and “crazy realistic” it is, how it’s the “obvious future” of the industry, and that “porn will never be the same.” Most popular were the first-person POV videos, where you take on the view and body of an actual porn star for the duration of a scene. For many, the feeling of inhabiting another person’s body in a hyper-real, intimate, explicit and human-scale scene was startling… then intriguing. Not only is the content just plain bigger than on a standard computer screen, you get the sensation of having a new porn-ready body (abs, boobs, whatever you choose) as it’s put to professional use.

Man, I’d look good with boobs.

The VR porn out there now is both traditional and high-tech. HoloGirlsVR offers 180 degree Point of View options with real actors and companies like Holodexxx are offering 360 degree environments and customizable CG characters. Big names like Naughty America and Kink are trialling production for both traditional, alternative, and kink content. There is enough being made that VR-specific content aggregators like VRSmash and SexLikeReal have sprung up online, and cater to multiple different viewing systems, and all kinds of viewers.

In them, the field of view is often limited, and in live-acted videos your movements don’t affect the action. But in the case of a sitting or prone viewer, this doesn’t seem distracting. Unlike in other VR applications, moving around to explore really isn’t the point with porn. Which isn’t to say exploration is unlikely. Because the only limit on who you can “be” is set by the content available, some viewers believe experiencing the POV of people of other genders or sexual orientations could have a humanizing effect you don’t get in standard porn. The intimacy of the view could even allow for more comfort in personal exploration in general.

Ladies watch porn too, go on brush ya browser off.

But will “normal” people buy a fancy headset just for porn? And does this mean the future of porn will be interactive? Not necessarily, on either count. Many big hitters in the tech world believe that passive media are on the rise in general, and that interactive gaming and entertainment will soon be eclipsed by individual viewing experiences. William Rhys Dekle, senior director at Microsoft Game Studios has said “I think that in the next 10 years, the major changes we will see will be different forms of passive entertainment.” Many professional futurists, like author Neil Stephenson (also a proponent of VR), share this view. Trends in the popularity of professional gaming as entertainment certainly support it. 

Other forward-looking tech folks think VR will be the thing to replace personal computing, or even smartphones. These claims are harder to sell, but sea change or not VR is estimated to be a $ 120 billion industry by 2020, and at least $ 20 billion is projected to come from porn.

So visionaries want our lives wrapped in VR, and VR porn wants us wrapped in new selves. Which wouldn’t necessarily be bad. As Will Fulton at Digital Trends noted, “In addition to opening up whole new avenues of kink, the ability to viscerally inhabit bodies unlike our own has compelling implications for how VR experiences could be used to cultivate empathy.” But not everyone is so optimistic. Like other types of porn, the VR version can be seen as an extremely isolating way of experiencing intimacy—literally cutting you off from the world around you, and can function to reinforce unrealistic norms around bodies and sex. At this stage it’s unclear whether or not a VR environment will intensify any of these existing concerns.

Sleek, inviting, sssexy.

The tech issues are simpler. The interface itself is still pretty encumbered. You wear a bulky blinding headset, use headphones, have to run a couple programs, stay clear of the corresponding wires, and download rather than stream your content. If the Kinect had issues getting buy-in because people didn’t want to look silly, will people be likely to don weird headgear just for an immersive erotic thrill? And speaking of that “immersive” experience, how will the sensory isolation relate to the desire for privacy? While it might be easier to hide what you’re currently looking at, it might be easier to get walked in on once you’re plugged in and going to town. Weirder looking sex toys exist, but as it stands streamlining will be helpful.

Visionaries want our lives wrapped in VR, and VR porn wants us wrapped in new selves.

Other technologies currently in development may make this kind of viewing experience even more compelling. Projects like Ultrahaptics are working on bringing haptic feedback and tactile sensation to VR. While it’s still in the works, results are suggesting that simulated physical sensations to compliment interactive visuals might not be too far off. Immersive porn you “act” in and can feel? That could get pretty intense.

How long until there’s VR porn of people using VR porn? 

If the concerns around isolation and self-consciousness are justified, the real/virtual blend of Augmented Reality might be the real goal, rather than full Virtual Reality. The use of total environments in VR makes for a compelling escape, but projecting content into real life and surroundings can give viewers a greater sense of believability and control. Plus AR tech is well on its way. Anyone with Snapchat has seen trivial augmentation in action, Pokemon Go is gameifying it in a handheld capacity, and brands like Microsoft are exploring its potential with serious tools like the HoloLens. While reviled, Google Glass already proved how much visual input we can fit into tiny wearables. Could the future of porn be a blended experience bringing actors and scenes into “real” personal spaces? Maybe AR would make shared viewing feasible?

As the high-tech sex entertainment industry develops, it’ll be interesting to consider where the questions of good design come in. Is VR an intimacy tool that responds to the needs of users, or does its complexity detract from its value? Are we more likely to see VR (or AR) adopted through better wearables, or implants, or other environmental design… like the TV room in Farenheit 451? 

Are you turned off by the idea, or is this a step towards that jetpack/flying car/hoverboard/hot android you dream of?

This post is part of the Core77 Sex-tacular, our editorial series exploring the myriad ways that technology and design are shaping the future of intimacy and sex.


Core77

What We’re Reading: A 38,000 Word Article on Code, Productivity Tips, Werner Herzog Explores Virtual Reality and More

Core77’s editors spend time combing through the news so you don’t have to. Here’s a weekly roundup of our favorite stories from the World Wide Web.

A Scrum Master in Ninja Socks, and Other Tales

When Bloomberg Businessweek published Paul Ford’s epic “What Is Code?” last June, I had every intention of reading it—really—but somehow never quite found the time (it’s 38,000 words long), and subsequently felt a stab of guilt and inadequacy every time I saw or heard it mentioned. When it won a National Magazine Award the other night, it was the last straw. I’m now halfway through, and experiencing a mix of amusement, enlightenment and discomfort/fear not normally inspired by magazine writing. 

Mason Currey, senior editor

Kickass Female Designers

Our loyal Designing Women readers won’t be surprised to hear that I’m always on the lookout for awesome products created by women. So I was excited to read an interview with Terese Alstin this week about her online store No Sir, where she promotes the work of “kickass female designers.” 

Rebecca Veit, columnist, Designing Women

15 Surprising Things Productive People Do Differently

Next week marks the beginning of the Lunar New Year—another opportunity to start the year on the right foot. After interviewing over 200 “ultra-productive people” and distilling their responses, here’s a listicle of 15 habits for getting the most out of this monkey year.

—LinYee Yuan, managing editor

The Man Who Invented Whack-a-Mole Has One More Chance

From exploding gas cylinders to pistol-packing “clients”, there are many lessons to be learned by ID’ers in this tale.

—Eric Ludlum, editorial director

Multitasking is Killing Your Brain

We all like to hit ourselves on the head about procrastination and will often blame our lack of willpower or self-motivation. As it turns out, our brains might just be to blame. Studies show our tendency to multitask put us in a feedback loop that rewards us with dopamine hits when we perform small and usually unproductive tasks (i.e. looking at emails and text messages). Learn more about what happens in our heads when we multitask, and maybe even find a way to break the cycle. 

– Allison Fonder, community manager

It’s well-known that America completely outproduced the Axis powers, but how was it practically achieved?

I’m reading Arthur Herman’s Freedom’s Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in World War II. How were GM auto plants converted to produce tanks, and what genius figured out how to crank out Liberty ships in under a week? Here’s the story of the beleaguered industrialists you’ve never heard of and the incredible job they did of marshaling resources, ingenuity and the unsung labor of millions.

—Rain Noe, senior editor

Werner Herzog on Virtual Reality

The German director (who previously experimented with 3D film in his 2010 documentary “Cave of Forgotten Dreams”) articulates some of his thoughts on the future of Virtual Reality, and how it will generate a completely new type of expression: “I am convinced that this is not going to be an extension of cinema or 3-D cinema or video games. It is something new, different and not experienced yet.”

—Alexandra Alexa, editorial assistant


Core77

Augmented Reality Climbing

While it’s possible to rearrange the handholds on an indoor climbing wall, it’s not terribly easy. But now a coder named Jon Cheng has come up with a bright way to instantly freshen up the climbing wall experience using augmented reality.

The tech is not NASA level, which makes it even more appealing. Cheng pulled off the following demonstration of his “Time Trial” game using just coding, projectors, a camera sensor and a laptop:

“A lot of people have been contacting us about Time Trial,” says Jesse O’Driscoll of Brooklyn Boulders, the co-working/climbing space that we covered here. “This is augmented reality like you’ve never seen before—it turns rock climbing into an interactive video game.”

Interesting, no? And I think the surface of this combination has yet to be scratched. While the current version of Cheng’s projections might not be Super Mario Bros IRL, adding a bit of digital interest and mutability to the patterns could prove tantalizing for the videogame crowd—and this is certainly better exercise.


Core77

Everyday Objects Turned Into Delightful Alternative Reality By Illustrator Tineke Meirink

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With her series ‘Stop Watch’ artist Tineke Meirink proofs that ‘it’s just more fun to take a closer look’. The Dutch artist takes photos of everyday objects found on the streets that are mostly dull or even invisible to most people but not to her. Tineke Meirink recognizes the beautiful potential in them, revealing it to us by digitally drawing delightful characters on the pictures. That way the photos get a whole different meaning, they come to life. She hopes it makes people realize that everything has its beauty.

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

These Humorous Illustrations Perfectly Sum Up The Reality Of Living With Anxiety And Depression

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British illustrator Gemma Correll has created comical illustrations to help her cope with the everyday struggles of living with clinical anxiety and depression. Correll — a graduate of the Norwich School of Art and Design — penned the comic-book style illustrations to raise awareness of the condition and to encourage people to speak more freely about the condition.

h/t: mashable, mymodernmet

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“The illustrations were all inspired by my own anxieties and neuroticism. I suffer from clinical anxiety and depression and I find that the best way to deal with it is to find humor in it,” Correll told Mashable. “I honestly think that humor can be a savior at times of distress or, if you just live with a constant level of anxiety and depression like I do.”

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

9 Painfully True SEX-Pectations Vs Reality

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Loryn Brantz is a two-time Emmy Award-winning illustrator and design professional. Her client list includes HarperCollins, PBS, and Facebook. She is also an award-winning children’s book author and earned the 2010 Moonbeam Children’s Book Award for Best First Picture Book for Harvey the Child Mime. Loryn is currently on staff at BuzzFeed writing and illustrating about stuff and things.

h/t: buzzfeed

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.