Tag Archives: power

Design Job: Pedal Power! Pearl Izumi is Seeking a Director, Design in Louisville, CO

Director, Design General Purpose: As Director, Design for Pearl Izumi, you’ll lead a talented design team to create product that combines aesthetic appeal with performance innovation. You’ll collaborate with the VP of Product and your fellow Directors to set strategic direction

View the full design job here
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The Mercedes-AMG GT Sedan Concept teaser reveals an EQ Power hybrid badge

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Expect a turbo V8 when the car goes to production.

Continue reading The Mercedes-AMG GT Sedan Concept teaser reveals an EQ Power hybrid badge

The Mercedes-AMG GT Sedan Concept teaser reveals an EQ Power hybrid badge originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 05 Mar 2017 13:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Chinese Power Company Rigs Up Drones That Can Spray Fire

“Drones” is a broad term, encompassing both the friendly multirotor type that carry GoPros over snowboarders, and the more menacing UAV type that fires rockets into convoys. The safe kind requires little more than a credit card to acquire, whereas the dangerous kind needs an encrypted satellite uplink and a team of burnt-out pilots manning workstations in Nevada.

Those differing barriers of entry are why I don’t like the idea of weaponizing the former. Yet it’s happening, though the people doing it may not realize they’re doing it. First graffiti artist Katsu rigged up a drone that could spraypaint. If multirotor drones can spray paint, then they can spray other compressed gasses, which I imagine has to give a terrorist ideas. And now a power company in China has rigged up a drone that can spray fire.

What’s happening is that airborne garbage is getting caught on overhead high voltage lines. The company reckons that the most efficient way to get it off is to burn it off–I guess this is what happens when you don’t have an OSHA or an EPA–and a multirotor is easier to send up than a worker in a hydraulic bucket.

All I can think about is how much damage something like this could do in, say, Manhattan. A firefighter’s bane is a blaze he cannot easily get to, and what we see here seems like the ideal way to start hard-to-reach fires.

Via Gizmodo


Core77

Chinese Power Company Rigs Up Drones That Can Spray Fire

“Drones” is a broad term, encompassing both the friendly multirotor type that carry GoPros over snowboarders, and the more menacing UAV type that fires rockets into convoys. The safe kind requires little more than a credit card to acquire, whereas the dangerous kind needs an encrypted satellite uplink and a team of burnt-out pilots manning workstations in Nevada.

Those differing barriers of entry are why I don’t like the idea of weaponizing the former. Yet it’s happening, though the people doing it may not realize they’re doing it. First graffiti artist Katsu rigged up a drone that could spraypaint. If multirotor drones can spray paint, then they can spray other compressed gasses, which I imagine has to give a terrorist ideas. And now a power company in China has rigged up a drone that can spray fire.

What’s happening is that airborne garbage is getting caught on overhead high voltage lines. The company reckons that the most efficient way to get it off is to burn it off–I guess this is what happens when you don’t have an OSHA or an EPA–and a multirotor is easier to send up than a worker in a hydraulic bucket.

All I can think about is how much damage something like this could do in, say, Manhattan. A firefighter’s bane is a blaze he cannot easily get to, and what we see here seems like the ideal way to start hard-to-reach fires.

Via Gizmodo


Core77

Chinese Power Company Rigs Up Drones That Can Spray Fire

“Drones” is a broad term, encompassing both the friendly multirotor type that carry GoPros over snowboarders, and the more menacing UAV type that fires rockets into convoys. The safe kind requires little more than a credit card to acquire, whereas the dangerous kind needs an encrypted satellite uplink and a team of burnt-out pilots manning workstations in Nevada.

Those differing barriers of entry are why I don’t like the idea of weaponizing the former. Yet it’s happening, though the people doing it may not realize they’re doing it. First graffiti artist Katsu rigged up a drone that could spraypaint. If multirotor drones can spray paint, then they can spray other compressed gasses, which I imagine has to give a terrorist ideas. And now a power company in China has rigged up a drone that can spray fire.

What’s happening is that airborne garbage is getting caught on overhead high voltage lines. The company reckons that the most efficient way to get it off is to burn it off–I guess this is what happens when you don’t have an OSHA or an EPA–and a multirotor is easier to send up than a worker in a hydraulic bucket.

All I can think about is how much damage something like this could do in, say, Manhattan. A firefighter’s bane is a blaze he cannot easily get to, and what we see here seems like the ideal way to start hard-to-reach fires.

Via Gizmodo


Core77

Toy Design & Casting, Testing Power Carving Tools, How to Tap Threads into Wood and More

Mr. Pen Man

Something very different from Jimmy DiResta this week. Jimmy, a former toy designer, goes back to his roots:

Testing Out Arbortech’s Power Carving Tools

Izzy Swan recently purchased a set of Arbortech’s stuff, and does an experimental carving to learn how to use them:

Art Frame

Frank Howarth creates a rail-and-stile frame for the large art piece he created last week, taking care to ensure the 4-foot-wide centerpiece has room to expand and contract:

Making an Axe Handle

April Wilkerson “gets the hang” of making an axe handle after a mid-project setback:

Tapping Threads Into Wood

Marc Spagnuolo is bringing a new tool to market, a set of taps designed to be used in wood. Check out some of the applications:

Building French Doors

Pretty cool to see from start to finish: The Samurai Carpenter builds, including the framing, a large set of wood-framed glass doors from scratch and installs it all:


Core77

Toy Design & Casting, Testing Power Carving Tools, How to Tap Threads into Wood and More

Mr. Pen Man

Something very different from Jimmy DiResta this week. Jimmy, a former toy designer, goes back to his roots:

Testing Out Arbortech’s Power Carving Tools

Izzy Swan recently purchased a set of Arbortech’s stuff, and does an experimental carving to learn how to use them:

Art Frame

Frank Howarth creates a rail-and-stile frame for the large art piece he created last week, taking care to ensure the 4-foot-wide centerpiece has room to expand and contract:

Making an Axe Handle

April Wilkerson “gets the hang” of making an axe handle after a mid-project setback:

Tapping Threads Into Wood

Marc Spagnuolo is bringing a new tool to market, a set of taps designed to be used in wood. Check out some of the applications:

Building French Doors

Pretty cool to see from start to finish: The Samurai Carpenter builds, including the framing, a large set of wood-framed glass doors from scratch and installs it all:


Core77

Toy Design & Casting, Testing Power Carving Tools, How to Tap Threads into Wood and More

Mr. Pen Man

Something very different from Jimmy DiResta this week. Jimmy, a former toy designer, goes back to his roots:

Testing Out Arbortech’s Power Carving Tools

Izzy Swan recently purchased a set of Arbortech’s stuff, and does an experimental carving to learn how to use them:

Art Frame

Frank Howarth creates a rail-and-stile frame for the large art piece he created last week, taking care to ensure the 4-foot-wide centerpiece has room to expand and contract:

Making an Axe Handle

April Wilkerson “gets the hang” of making an axe handle after a mid-project setback:

Tapping Threads Into Wood

Marc Spagnuolo is bringing a new tool to market, a set of taps designed to be used in wood. Check out some of the applications:

Building French Doors

Pretty cool to see from start to finish: The Samurai Carpenter builds, including the framing, a large set of wood-framed glass doors from scratch and installs it all:


Core77

How A DIY Dress Helped One Woman Reclaim The Power Words Had On Her Body

Words have power. This is something Jojo Oldham knows all too well.

Whether you’re a soap star hearing lewd comments made by a politician 10 years ago or the average woman getting catcalled on her way home from work, what other people have to say about your body leave a lasting impression.

More info: Jojo Oldham (h/t: upworthy)

Over Oldham’s 31 years of existence, she’s received countless comments about her body — both good and bad. After years of letting these words affect how she sees herself, however, Oldham was finally ready to release them and embrace herself.

She took all the comments she’s heard about her body over the years and painted them on a dress. Posing for pictures, with a smile on her face, she took the power those words had over her and refused to let them dictate her self-worth any longer.







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