Tag Archives: plastic

The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 4: Laser Cutting, Plastic Welding

Here in Part 4, the prototype of the mobile solar charging platform starts to take shape. Industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, shows us the tricks of the trade:

– Using a laser cutter on the styrene forms that he vacuum-formed last time, he’s able to get precise shapes in a compound-curved surface

– When cutting out parts that don’t require an entire sheet of material, he uses the opportunity to cut extra test parts out of the extra material

– The versatility of styrene, which he’s even able to fashion hinges out of

– The benefits of wet sanding, and the importance of sanding blocks

– How to solvent-weld plastic with great precision

Check it out:


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The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 4: Laser Cutting, Plastic Welding

Here in Part 4, the prototype of the mobile solar charging platform starts to take shape. Industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, shows us the tricks of the trade:

– Using a laser cutter on the styrene forms that he vacuum-formed last time, he’s able to get precise shapes in a compound-curved surface

– When cutting out parts that don’t require an entire sheet of material, he uses the opportunity to cut extra test parts out of the extra material

– The versatility of styrene, which he’s even able to fashion hinges out of

– The benefits of wet sanding, and the importance of sanding blocks

– How to solvent-weld plastic with great precision

Check it out:


Core77

The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 4: Laser Cutting, Plastic Welding

Here in Part 4, the prototype of the mobile solar charging platform starts to take shape. Industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, shows us the tricks of the trade:

– Using a laser cutter on the styrene forms that he vacuum-formed last time, he’s able to get precise shapes in a compound-curved surface

– When cutting out parts that don’t require an entire sheet of material, he uses the opportunity to cut extra test parts out of the extra material

– The versatility of styrene, which he’s even able to fashion hinges out of

– The benefits of wet sanding, and the importance of sanding blocks

– How to solvent-weld plastic with great precision

Check it out:


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Abushe, An African Child With Plastic Eyes


Eric Lafforgue

Abushe lives in southern Ethiopia. No one would pay any attention to him, but if you catch a glimpse of his eyes, their incredible magnetic colour will stop you in your tracks. Abushe suffers from the Waardenburg syndrome. One of the characteristics of this syndrome is an abnormal spacing between the eyes but mainly a special pigmentation of the irises. This phenomenon is rare. Its effects are obviously striking on a child with black skin like the little Ethiopian.

More info: Eric Lafforgue


Eric Lafforgue


Eric Lafforgue


Eric Lafforgue


Eric Lafforgue


Eric Lafforgue


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

How Plastic Bags are Made

Even as municipalities mull banning them, plastic bags will probably remain an indispensable part of our lives. Our usage of them goes way beyond the handled variety given out at stores: We buy food packaged in plastic bags, save leftovers in Ziplocs, throw garbage out in them.

You probably realize that like all plastic goods, plastic bags start out as pellets. But how do manufacturers turn pellets into, say, aforementioned Ziplocs? Take a look:

We’re showing you this video to broaden your manufacturing knowledge, not to endorse plastic bags. Don’t worry, up next we’ll cleanse your palate with some useful plastic recycling information.


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How Plastic Bags are Made

Even as municipalities mull banning them, plastic bags will probably remain an indispensable part of our lives. Our usage of them goes way beyond the handled variety given out at stores: We buy food packaged in plastic bags, save leftovers in Ziplocs, throw garbage out in them.

You probably realize that like all plastic goods, plastic bags start out as pellets. But how do manufacturers turn pellets into, say, aforementioned Ziplocs? Take a look:

We’re showing you this video to broaden your manufacturing knowledge, not to endorse plastic bags. Don’t worry, up next we’ll cleanse your palate with some useful plastic recycling information.


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An Artist Has Created A Giant Mosaic Made From Recycled Plastic Bottles Depicting Vincent Van Gogh’s Famous Painting ‘The Starry Night’

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Photo by Yueh-Hua Lee

A giant mosaic made from recycled plastic bottles depicting Vincent van Gogh’s famous painting The Starry Night is to be unveiled in Keelung’s Embrace Cultural and Creative Park, Northern Taiwan.

h/t: taipeitimes

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Photo by Yueh-Hua Lee

The mosaic, named The Starry Paradise, covers 53 hectares and is expected to set a new Guinness World Record as the largest of its kind.

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Photo by Yueh-Hua Lee

The project is almost complete and the artist responsible for its creation has received more than 4 million recycled plastic bottles in donations, the park management said.

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Photo by Yueh-Hua Lee

Finding the plastic bottles to create The Starry Paradise was a trying experience, said Wang Cheng-wei, the designer and overseer of the piece, who is also a lecturer at the National Changhua University of Education and a renowned sculptor involved in many public art projects.

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Photo by Yueh-Hua Lee

The installation cost 90 million Taiwan dollars (2.5 Million Euro) that aims to promote environmental protection. The bottles were donated by recycling centers as well as individuals, and for every 10 bottles that were received, the park donated NT$ 1 to the Canlove Social Service Association, a charity that aims to help people with depression, Wang said.

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Photo by Shulin Lu

“The project focuses on the concepts of healing and art, while serving as a charity that addresses environmental concerns,” park spokesperson Jeffrey Wang said.

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

“This project is a dialogue between Vincent van Gogh and me,” Wang Cheng-wei said.

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

“It has different visual effects in daytime when the grass under the mosaic forms a contrast with the arrangement’s colors, while at night LED lights illuminate the places where stars are in Van Gogh’s composition,” the artist said.

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising

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Photo by Jo-Jing Advertising


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

With These DIY Machines, Anyone Can Transform Plastic Waste into New and Useful Objects

The statistics around plastic waste are astonishing. Over 100 million tons of plastic are manufactured around the world each year, but according to an EPA study from last year, only 9% of what we make is successfully recovered through recycling. The reasons behind this are many, starting with general consumer confusion about what can and cannot be recycled. Moreover, the complex industrial processes that execute the sorting and transformation of plastic material have pretty high margins of error. Because of this, many companies refuse to use recycled plastic as it tends to be less pure and can damage their machines and slow down production.

Dutch designer and Core77 contributor Dave Hakkens is pursuing a grass-roots approach to this problem by creating at-home versions of industrial recycling machines that are far simpler and offer a more productive way of handling our plastic waste. Last month he released version 2.0 of Precious Plastic, a project that he has been developing for years. “The project started as my graduation project at Design Academy Eindhoven back in 2013, but at that stage it was more a proof of concept—the machines worked but were still quite hard to re-build,” Hakkens told us. “Over the last year we’ve spent a lot of time re-developing the machines so they only use easily available materials that can be found all over the world. The machines we came up with can be made using only basic tools and by referencing our instruction videos. We’ve been working really hard to make the process as easy as possible for others to get started.”

He developed four machines—a plastic shredder, an extruder, an injection molder and a rotation molder—that all center around a modular system for easy repairs and customization options. Blueprints and a robust series of instructional videos are available online, so anyone can download them and become a “craftsman of plastic.”

So far, Hakkens has used his machines to create a a bunch of everyday objects—including, hats, tableware and clipboards—but this is just starting to scratch the surface of possibilities. “Personally, I’d love to have a collection of plastic objects that show the true value of the material,” he said. “But for know the focus is still on getting the information spread and helping people around the world get started.”


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An Alternative to Plastic Utensils: Edible Cutlery!

If you order takeout from Seamless, there’s a button you can check off so the restaurant won’t bring you plastic cutlery. If only we could click on that button to end all plastic cutlery. Of all the things we could devote petroleum to, producing disposable cutlery seems silly.

India-based entrepreneur Narayana Peesapathy has a much more intelligent alternative. He’s developed edible cutlery, specifically spoons, worked out a way to mass produce them, and reckons he can get the production cost down on par with plastic:

Peesapathy is a serious big-picture thinker. What’s not obvious from the video is that he’s considered a lot more than just avoiding plastic for its harmful effects; by using flour derived from sorghum, he’s attempting to balance out the Indian agricultural ecosystem:

[The] depletion of groundwater can be arrested by creating markets for less irrigation demanding crops such as jowar (sorghum). The edible cutlery is made from flours of this crop.

Demand for power from the agriculture sector [is] not commensurate [with] its contribution to the GDP and on the contrary is creating pressures on other sectors, notably on the manufacturing sector. This is largely because of…faulty crop choices. This initiative could help in triggering the right crop mix (even districts with scanty rainfall are registering increasing trends in water guzzling rice crop).

Our readers in India can currently order the spoons, either flavored or plain, from Peesapathy’s company, Bakey’s. For those outside of India, the company is accepting orders in quantities of 2,000 to 20,000 units, ready to ship as of August 2016.


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These Sculptural Vases Are Designed To Use An Old Plastic Bottle Inside Them

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Designer Libero Rutilo of DesignLibero, has created a unique way to give life back to used plastic water bottles. His idea was to create a 3D printed sculptural vase exterior, that can be placed over the top of a water bottle, and can be screwed on like a cap.

h/t: contemporist

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You can find the vases on Make it LEO and Tessa’s Curated Boutique, where you can purchase the digital design file that can be printed from anywhere in the world with a 3D printer.

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Just for the tech of it: Air pollution pigeons, plastic eating bacteria, and more

On this week’s episode of Just For The Tech Of It, Drew gives us the lowdown on three big fights: How scientists are using machine learning to fight terrorism, how pigeons are fighting pollution in London, and how a new strain of bacteria could help us fight plastic pollution

The post Just for the tech of it: Air pollution pigeons, plastic eating bacteria, and more appeared first on Digital Trends.

Digital Trends

British Product Designer Pioneers Method to Recycle Chewing Gum Into Moldable Plastic

While studying product design at the University of Brighton, Anna Bullus gave herself an interesting project: She’d pick up every single piece of litter she could find on the way home, then Google each one to see if it was recyclable and how. Inside an empty bag of potato chips she found a piece of spent chewing gum. Her searches for how to recycle chewing gum turned up empty.

So no one was recyling the stuff, yet it was everywhere, all around the world. Every New Yorker has trod on subway platforms caked in black dots that used to be chewing gum, and Brighton’s sidewalks apparently suffer from the same affliction. Bullus became determined to develop a worthwhile use for the stuff.

After spending eight months in the U. of B. chemistry lab, then a further three years at the London Metropolitan University’s Polymers Department, Bullus succeeded in turning spent chewing gum into a polymer-like material that she calls Gum-Tec. According to British Plastics & Rubber magazine,

“Gum-tec is the brand name we have given for a group of new compounds that are made with recycled chewing gum,” explained Anna. “Most of the compounds that we create are thermoplastic and thermoplastic elastomers. It has taken a huge amount of time to develop these different compounds and to understand which applications they would be best suited to. We are still developing and still learning new things everyday, so this process is ongoing as we get better at what we do.”

Like plastic, Gum-Tec can be injection- and blow-molded, and the first product Bullus designed with it is rather brilliant: Called the Gumdrop Bin, it’s a bubblegum-colored receptacle that passersby are meant to spit their gum into. 

Once the bins are full, the company Bullus set up, Gumdrop LTD., collects the spent gum and uses them to create more bins. (One bin full of gum yields another three bins.) Launched in 2011, Gumdrop Bins have been installed at post offices, shopping centers and in towns and cities across the UK. Studies show that the bins reduce local gum litter by nearly 50% within 12 weeks of being installed.

Gumdrop LTD. is currently in the process of signing deals in Denmark, and Bullus has her sights set on other cities across Europe and the U.S. This year they’re also launching an entire line of Gum-Tec-based consumer products including cups, plastic utensils, guitar picks, frisbees, doorstops, rulers, food containers and hairbrushes (the latter being quite ironic as gum is typically the worst thing you can get in your hair). Interested distributors can learn more here.


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British Product Designer Pioneers Method to Recycle Chewing Gum Into Moldable Plastic

While studying product design at the University of Brighton, Anna Bullus gave herself an interesting project: She’d pick up every single piece of litter she could find on the way home, then Google each one to see if it was recyclable and how. Inside an empty bag of potato chips she found a piece of spent chewing gum. Her searches for how to recycle chewing gum turned up empty.

So no one was recyling the stuff, yet it was everywhere, all around the world. Every New Yorker has trod on subway platforms caked in black dots that used to be chewing gum, and Brighton’s sidewalks apparently suffer from the same affliction. Bullus became determined to develop a worthwhile use for the stuff.

After spending eight months in the U. of B. chemistry lab, then a further three years at the London Metropolitan University’s Polymers Department, Bullus succeeded in turning spent chewing gum into a polymer-like material that she calls Gum-Tec. According to British Plastics & Rubber magazine,

“Gum-tec is the brand name we have given for a group of new compounds that are made with recycled chewing gum,” explained Anna. “Most of the compounds that we create are thermoplastic and thermoplastic elastomers. It has taken a huge amount of time to develop these different compounds and to understand which applications they would be best suited to. We are still developing and still learning new things everyday, so this process is ongoing as we get better at what we do.”

Like plastic, Gum-Tec can be injection- and blow-molded, and the first product Bullus designed with it is rather brilliant: Called the Gumdrop Bin, it’s a bubblegum-colored receptacle that passersby are meant to spit their gum into. 

Once the bins are full, the company Bullus set up, Gumdrop LTD., collects the spent gum and uses them to create more bins. (One bin full of gum yields another three bins.) Launched in 2011, Gumdrop Bins have been installed at post offices, shopping centers and in towns and cities across the UK. Studies show that the bins reduce local gum litter by nearly 50% within 12 weeks of being installed.

Gumdrop LTD. is currently in the process of signing deals in Denmark, and Bullus has her sights set on other cities across Europe and the U.S. This year they’re also launching an entire line of Gum-Tec-based consumer products including cups, plastic utensils, guitar picks, frisbees, doorstops, rulers, food containers and hairbrushes (the latter being quite ironic as gum is typically the worst thing you can get in your hair). Interested distributors can learn more here.


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Plastic That Turns Into Clay and Back Again

A company called Polysis specializes in producing polyurethane resins, and with their secret recipe of herbs and spices they’ve produced a peculiar plastic called “haplafreely.” What’s unique about the stuff is that simply dropping it into a glass of hot water turns it into a clay-like substance that can be freely molded by hand; once it cools back to room temperature, it hardens again, while maintaining its new shape. Check this out:

I wonder how well the stuff “molds.” For example, let’s say you needed to take an impression of something, like a stamped tin ceiling in an old building. It would be neat if you could capture the impression of a tile, then bring the haplafreely back to the 3D scanner in your office and capture the pattern in software, for later reproduction.

I could also see survivalists taking a shine to the stuff, particularly those folks who improvise their own tools; haplafreely could provide an instant ergonomic handle as long as you had access to water and flame.

It’s also bound to have some applications for modelmaking and prototyping, and I like that it can be reused again and again.

If you had access to the stuff, what would you use it for?


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Upcycling Plastic Bottles Into a Storage System

Veteran dumpster diver Thomas Dambo hit paydirt at an industrial laundry. Discovering that they discarded scores of detergent bottles, Dambo biked them back to his workshop, cleaned ’em up and hacked them into this:

The Danish artist views trash as a resource, a message he hopes to spread to others via his projects and YouTube channel. This philosophy came to him early: As he explains in the video below, as a child seeking out building materials with no money, he realized that “all of my dreams were in dumpsters just around the corner.”

In the following interview conducted by photographer/storyteller Phillip Høpner, we get to see inside Dambo’s shop, and learn a bit more about his philosophies:

So many good quotes in there, and the one that’ll stick with me as I’m fiddling around in my own shop is “When you do something stupid, you learn something new.” (I’ll have to resist the temptation to say to myself, after I once again cut a piece an inch too short, “Today I learned I am an idiot.”)

Check out more of Dambo’s work here.


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Anna Castelli Ferrieri’s Plastic Fantastic

Long before Philippe Starck’s Ghost chair became de rigueur for trendy restaurant seating, Kartell was known for manufacturing one humble item—a ski rack for automobiles. From this first object, released in 1949, Giulio Castelli and Anna Castelli Ferrieri built a plastics empire that expanded into housewares, lighting and furniture, all based on their vision of plastic as a new platform for well-designed, mass-produced, low-cost products. Giulio and Anna were married for six years before founding Kartell, and their backgrounds—his as a chemical engineer and hers as an architect—were a perfect match for a company that wed creative design to innovative product engineering.

Anna Castelli Ferrieri working in her Milan studio, 1974. Photo by Valerio Castelli. All images courtesy Kartell

Anna began her architecture education in 1938 at the Milan Polytechnic Institute, where she was one of only three women in her class. Here she was introduced to the ideas of the Bauhaus and the work of Italian Neo-Rationalist architect Franco Albini, embracing their modernist design language based on simplicity, functionality and rationality. After graduating in 1943, Anna took on a number of architectural commissions, establishing her independent practice in 1946. Three years later, she and Giulio founded Kartell, but Anna continued to run her architecture office; it wasn’t until 1964 that she designed her first product for Kartell, a table for the residence attached to the Hotel Gritti in Venice. From 1959 until 1973 she and architect Ignazio Gardella established a joint practice and collaborated on two of her most notable architectural projects, the 1966 design for Kartell’s seven-acre industrial facilities outside of Milan, and the 1969 Alfa Romeo technical offices in Arese, Italy.

Castelli Ferrieri’s first design for Kartell was a round dining table made of polyester resin reinforced with glass fiber. The table was designed in collaboration with Ignazio Gardella for a residence attached to the Hotel Gritti in Venice.
Kartell’s industrial facilities, designed by Castelli Ferrieri and Gardella; the design of the blocky red buildings is echoed in many of her later product designs.
View from the carpark of the completed Alfa Romeo technical offices by Castelli Ferrieri and Gardella

Although Anna’s architectural work spans more than 50 projects, her most lauded design remains the Componibili for Kartell, a modular, stackable storage unit made of injection-molded ABS. In continuous production since 1967, it is still one of Kartell’s best sellers and is frequently credited with ushering in a new paradigm of modern furniture design, one that capitalized on the latest technology of the 1960s and the era’s prevailing youthfulness and relaxed attitudes. The Componibili came in a rainbow of colors, in square or round shapes, with wheels or without, and could function as a stool, a nightstand or a storage container. Simply put, it looked like the future.

The square Componibili storage system from 1967 was one of the first Kartell products to use ABS, a new material at the time. The different units can be stacked without using tools by nesting the components on top of one another.
Castelli Ferrieri followed the square Componibili with a cylindrical version in 1969; both versions remain in production today.

Anna’s forward-thinking designs, and her guidance as Kartell’s art director from 1976 to 1987, helped set the tone for the company’s furniture business and gave it a highly distinctive identity based on geometric shapes, primary colors and high-gloss finishes. Working with designers like Richard Sapper, Joe Colombo and Gae Aulenti, she advanced plastic as a viable option for furniture and product design, proving that it could be a strong, high-quality material that was economical, practical and even glamorous. While some of the other Kartell designers during this period experimented with what Anna referred to as the “slightly rounded and awkward shapes that we generally call ‘plastic,’” she remained loyal to her modernist roots and created a series of tables, chairs and household goods that relied on straight lines, minimalist forms and rational shapes that could be stacked. Through plastic she also acknowledged her influences; her stacking, three-legged Stool-table 4810 was an homage to Alvar Aalto’s iconic Stool 60. Anna also experimented with new material techniques and innovations, such as in a 1982 table that was the first to be made entirely of injection-molded plastic. Later she would even try her hand at a Memphis-inspired design with a 1988 lounge chair that had a “marbleized” structure created by injecting a blend of plastic materials into the mold, a process that made each piece unique.

The polypropylene Stool-table 4810, “Tavello,” was Castelli Ferrieri’s nod to Alvar Aalto’s famous three-legged stool.

Anna and Giulio retired from Kartell in 1988 after selling the company to their son-in-law, Claudio Luti. Even in her advanced years, Anna remained active in the design field, teaching at Milan’s Domus Academy from 1987 to 1992 and taking on various commissions in the ’90s, including a sofa design for Arflex, a seat for Matteo Grassi and flatware for Sambonet. Both Anna and Giulio lived long enough to see Kartell re-energized by a new generation of design collaborations with the likes of Patricia Urquiola, Philippe Starck and Ron Arad; Anna passed away in 2006 at age 87, followed just four months later by Giulio at age 86.

Lounge chair 4814, from 1988, was a playful departure from Castelli Ferrieri’s past use of rigid geometric shapes and primary colors.
Table 4300, from 1982, was the first table produced where all the components were made of injection-molded ABS. 
Technical drawing with plan and section views of Table 4300
Castelli Ferrieri’s Chair 4870 was awarded the Compasso d’Oro in 1986 for harmoniously balancing “purpose, economy and technology.”
Stacked series 4870 chairs, 1986
Castelli Ferrieri’s family of Stools 4822/4826 were best sellers and remained in production from 1979 to 1998; a cushion could be inserted in the hole of the seat.
An early computer diagram showing the internal structure of Stools 4822/4826
Table ashtray 4640 was designed by Castelli Ferrieri in 1979. Cigarettes were instantly extinguished by inserting them in one of the center holes.
Collection of stacking bowls from the 5500 series for Kartell by Castelli Ferrieri, 1977
Collection of Kartell tablewares designed by Castelli Ferrieri, Centrokappa and Franco Raggi, 1976
Kartell’s design team at the 1969 Salone del Mobile in Milan: Olaf von Bohr, Gino Colombini, Alberto Rosselli, Ignazio Gardella, Joe Colombo, Castelli Ferrieri and Giotto Stoppino

This was the latest installment of our Designing Women series. Previously, we profiled Ellen Manderfield.


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Designing Plastic Products ‘With Soul’

When Dan Black—who recently bought out business partner Martin Blum to take on sole ownership of renowned UK industrial design house Black+Blum—launched a dishrack inspired by the skeletal shapes of Calatravan architecture, he knew he’d hit on a new niche.

With so many folks investing heavily in their dream luxury kitchen these days, Dan was surprised to find so few kitchenware products that could sit comfortably in these unrelentingly minimal contemporary kitchens that didn’t also come with exorbitant pricetags. The resounding success of the space saving (protruding ribs to hold glasses tightly beside dishes), aesthetically sophisticated and context fitting (a clever little flap incorporated into the tray for ‘on’ and ‘off’ drainage) rack got Black and his team thinking—what would a range of products designed with the same characteristics look like?

The Forminimal Dish Rack – sculptural and functional in equal measures

So began a gruelling six-month process for Dan and the team at Black+Blum in which they developed a family of ten products around the principles that had shaped the first: an uncompromising balance of style and substance at a price point suitable for those who’d already blown the budget on that polished concrete worktop.

The range the team developed combines some stylishly matte white and slate grey polypropylene with warm touches of silken bamboo – just one of the techniques employed to give the plastic products ‘soul’ as Dan describes it.

Another is undoubtably the intense attention to detail given over to the production of the range—Dan and colleague Rich Donaldson tell stories of the battles they fought with the manufacturers to get the matte finish just right and the extraordinary lengths of trial and error production prototyping they went through to develop radius and angles (particularly for the voluminous bread bin) that would shrink down to give perfectly straight edges when removed from molds and cooled.

Straight architectural edges the result of serious industrial design know how

Another way that the design team injected a little life into the range was the old but often underemployed trick of creating products that are simply a delight to use. The bread bin and combined knife, board and utensil holder present themselves at the perfect angle for kitchen worktop environments. The knife block also does away with tricky slots and replaces them with a section filled with carbonized (i.e. mould-free) bamboo sticks in which to stick knives into.

All your utensils at just the right, grabbable angle
Carbonized bamboo sticks are easy to insert knives back into
Chopping boards that become a feature and a kitchen roll holder that blends into the background (and is usable with one hand)

With no detail left undesigned, the team also turned their attention to creating beautiful packaging that would make their products prop. Looking at shelves of kitchenware the team noticed a tendency for bland, boring boxes in white and grey so decided to take the exact opposite approach to give their range some standout. The result is shelves crammed with bold, colourful boxes that hero the simplicity and elegance of their wares—and could compete on design styling with the best of the electronics industry.


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