Tag Archives: parts

If you define day cruising as equal parts sun and speed, choose Wallytender X

If you’re looking for a fast day cruiser or a quick superyacht guest shuttle, the Wallytender X fills both roles nicely. The 1200 horsepower top engine configuration has will scoot between island stops at 69 miles per hour.

The post If you define day cruising as equal parts sun and speed, choose Wallytender X appeared first on Digital Trends.

Digital Trends

Literally Brilliant “Lighting Robot” Brings Sunlight To Parts of Your Home That Can’t Get Any

At certain times of year, the sun bounces off of a glass skyscraper outside my window and illuminates my apartment from an unusual angle. And the room then looks dramatically different. The sun has to thread the needle to hit this position, and the phenomenon only lasts for a few moments.

Biotechnologist and bioinformaticist Dr. Diva Tommei has developed a literally brilliant way to capitalize on this reflection of sunlight. Check out her robotic, solar-powered invention:

While she refers to the device as “Lucy” in the video, the product’s name has since been changed to “Caia.” Look at the dramatic difference it makes in a room:

Caia was successfully crowdfunded last year on IndieGogo and is going into production, with the first units slated to ship this June. It is expected to retail for $ 299.


Core77

The SafariSeat: A Low-Cost, All-Terrain, Open-Source Wheelchair Built from Bicycle Parts

If you want to research how to design for those with disabilities, you can buy the Inclusive Design Toolkit we looked at here. But industrial designer Janna Deeble did his research the hard way: An accident left him in a wheelchair for three months, providing first-hand experience of what it’s like to not be able to use your legs.

The market for wheelchair users in developed nations is one that designers are already addressing. But there’s a need in developing nations for wheelchairs too, in regions where there are no sidewalks. Even if impoverished residents could afford a conventional wheelchair, it would do little good over dirt tracks and goat pastures.

Thus Deeble assembled a design team and developed SafariSeat, a low-cost, all-terrain, open-source wheelchair made from commonly-available bicycle parts:

Deeble’s four-person outfit, Uji, has as their mission “to design tools that help people lift themselves out of the poverty cycle.” The SafariSeat project is their first, and it’s off to a promising start; it’s not only been successfully Kickstarted, but is truly going to make a difference in people’s lives.

“The open source toolkit means we don’t have to pay licensing fees, allowing businesses to grow freely,” says Matthew Lukindo of the Association for the Physically Disabled of Kenya (APDK). “This will mean more SafariSeats and more jobs for the community. The all-terrain [capability] and low cost design makes it perfect for the Kenyan environment.”

At press time, the campaign had netted $ 68,977 on a $ 37,370 goal, but they can still use more funding. The current amounts pledged enable Uji and the APDK to set up two workshops in East Africa and produce 100 SafariSeats. More funding would not only allow them to produce more, but will also enable them to set up a disability outreach program to locate the undocumented folks in isolated regions who are desperately in need of a SafariSeat. There’s just nine days left in the campaign, and you can pledge here.


Core77

BMW will show huge range of M Performance parts at SEMA

Filed under: ,,,,,,,,,,

SEMA isn’t just for custom American muscle cars.

Continue reading BMW will show huge range of M Performance parts at SEMA

BMW will show huge range of M Performance parts at SEMA originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 30 Oct 2016 12:59:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog

Adding Storage to a Bicycle, Improving Your Designs Mid-Project, How to Make Parts Fit Together, a Clever DIY Camera Dolly and More

Router Bit Storage and Mid-Project Modification

This is a great example of designing on-the-fly and making adjustments when your first idea doesn’t work out. Here April Wilkerson cooks up a design for wall-mounted bit storage, and after she finds her initial concept too unstable, devises a clever way to remedy it without having to start all over:

How Much Sawdust Do They Kick Out? Tablesaw vs. Miter Saw vs. Bandsaw

Breathing in a lot of sawdust over time is no good for your long-term health. Using a device that can read airborne particle counts, Matthias Wandel compares the sawdust amounts produced by a tablesaw, miter saw and a bandsaw, showing you which produces the least and under which circumstances:

Camera Dolly Rig with Turning Capability

This week, Izzy Swan designs and builds a dolly rig for a camera—enabling it to do a curving tracking shot, using an adjustable four-wheel-steering set-up:

The Wood-Fitting Technique That Reduces Cursing By Up to 50%!

Here Jesse de Geest demonstrates a clever Japanese technique called “Killing the Wood.” This is what you do when two pieces that are supposed to fit together are off by just 1/32 of an inch:

Turned Mallet

As always, part of the fun of watching a Jimmy DiResta video is trying to figure out what he’s doing at certain points. In this one, where he makes a mallet, it wasn’t obvious to me when he started measuring the Forstner bit—then you see why later and think “Ah, of course!”

More Chainsaw Milling the Walnut Tree

Frank Howarth’s working for his wood again, continuing to turn a friend’s fallen walnut tree into slabs with a chainsaw mill:

What Kind of Wood Should You Build With?

Might be too basic for the average Core77 reader, but will be helpful for people working with wood for the first time. Steve Ramsey breaks down a basic materials question: Why use hardwood vs. softwood, plywood, or MDF?

Shop-Vac-Powered Air Hockey Table

Father of the Year, Bob Clagett, figures out how to DIY an air hockey table for his kids, using a shop-vac as the blower. At the end, he helpfully runs down a list of mistakes he made along the way, things you might want to do differently, et cetera:

The Search for Production Efficiency

Sandra Powell had a ton of drawers to build for her island cabinet project, and here seeks ways to increase her efficiency with several different jigs and set-ups:

DIY Barn-Style Door

Remember that shed that Linn from Darbin Orvar constructed a few weeks ago? Now she’s finishing it up, creating a barn-style door from 2×10 framing lumber ripped into components of more manageable size. She then completes the organization of the interior:

Laura’s Cargo Bike

Laura Kampf wanted some cargo space on her bike, and here she welds it up. If you’re wondering why she opted for flat instead of a basket, it was for the sake of flexibility: “I built it so you can securely attach a Systainer, a [case of beer] or a basket to it…or a passenger,” she writes.


Core77

Adding Storage to a Bicycle, Improving Your Designs Mid-Project, How to Make Parts Fit Together, a Clever DIY Camera Dolly and More

Router Bit Storage and Mid-Project Modification

This is a great example of designing on-the-fly and making adjustments when your first idea doesn’t work out. Here April Wilkerson cooks up a design for wall-mounted bit storage, and after she finds her initial concept too unstable, devises a clever way to remedy it without having to start all over:

How Much Sawdust Do They Kick Out? Tablesaw vs. Miter Saw vs. Bandsaw

Breathing in a lot of sawdust over time is no good for your long-term health. Using a device that can read airborne particle counts, Matthias Wandel compares the sawdust amounts produced by a tablesaw, miter saw and a bandsaw, showing you which produces the least and under which circumstances:

Camera Dolly Rig with Turning Capability

This week, Izzy Swan designs and builds a dolly rig for a camera—enabling it to do a curving tracking shot, using an adjustable four-wheel-steering set-up:

The Wood-Fitting Technique That Reduces Cursing By Up to 50%!

Here Jesse de Geest demonstrates a clever Japanese technique called “Killing the Wood.” This is what you do when two pieces that are supposed to fit together are off by just 1/32 of an inch:

Turned Mallet

As always, part of the fun of watching a Jimmy DiResta video is trying to figure out what he’s doing at certain points. In this one, where he makes a mallet, it wasn’t obvious to me when he started measuring the Forstner bit—then you see why later and think “Ah, of course!”

More Chainsaw Milling the Walnut Tree

Frank Howarth’s working for his wood again, continuing to turn a friend’s fallen walnut tree into slabs with a chainsaw mill:

What Kind of Wood Should You Build With?

Might be too basic for the average Core77 reader, but will be helpful for people working with wood for the first time. Steve Ramsey breaks down a basic materials question: Why use hardwood vs. softwood, plywood, or MDF?

Shop-Vac-Powered Air Hockey Table

Father of the Year, Bob Clagett, figures out how to DIY an air hockey table for his kids, using a shop-vac as the blower. At the end, he helpfully runs down a list of mistakes he made along the way, things you might want to do differently, et cetera:

The Search for Production Efficiency

Sandra Powell had a ton of drawers to build for her island cabinet project, and here seeks ways to increase her efficiency with several different jigs and set-ups:

DIY Barn-Style Door

Remember that shed that Linn from Darbin Orvar constructed a few weeks ago? Now she’s finishing it up, creating a barn-style door from 2×10 framing lumber ripped into components of more manageable size. She then completes the organization of the interior:

Laura’s Cargo Bike

Laura Kampf wanted some cargo space on her bike, and here she welds it up. If you’re wondering why she opted for flat instead of a basket, it was for the sake of flexibility: “I built it so you can securely attach a Systainer, a [case of beer] or a basket to it…or a passenger,” she writes.


Core77

Adding Storage to a Bicycle, Improving Your Designs Mid-Project, How to Make Parts Fit Together, a Clever DIY Camera Dolly and More

Router Bit Storage and Mid-Project Modification

This is a great example of designing on-the-fly and making adjustments when your first idea doesn’t work out. Here April Wilkerson cooks up a design for wall-mounted bit storage, and after she finds her initial concept too unstable, devises a clever way to remedy it without having to start all over:

How Much Sawdust Do They Kick Out? Tablesaw vs. Miter Saw vs. Bandsaw

Breathing in a lot of sawdust over time is no good for your long-term health. Using a device that can read airborne particle counts, Matthias Wandel compares the sawdust amounts produced by a tablesaw, miter saw and a bandsaw, showing you which produces the least and under which circumstances:

Camera Dolly Rig with Turning Capability

This week, Izzy Swan designs and builds a dolly rig for a camera—enabling it to do a curving tracking shot, using an adjustable four-wheel-steering set-up:

The Wood-Fitting Technique That Reduces Cursing By Up to 50%!

Here Jesse de Geest demonstrates a clever Japanese technique called “Killing the Wood.” This is what you do when two pieces that are supposed to fit together are off by just 1/32 of an inch:

Turned Mallet

As always, part of the fun of watching a Jimmy DiResta video is trying to figure out what he’s doing at certain points. In this one, where he makes a mallet, it wasn’t obvious to me when he started measuring the Forstner bit—then you see why later and think “Ah, of course!”

More Chainsaw Milling the Walnut Tree

Frank Howarth’s working for his wood again, continuing to turn a friend’s fallen walnut tree into slabs with a chainsaw mill:

What Kind of Wood Should You Build With?

Might be too basic for the average Core77 reader, but will be helpful for people working with wood for the first time. Steve Ramsey breaks down a basic materials question: Why use hardwood vs. softwood, plywood, or MDF?

Shop-Vac-Powered Air Hockey Table

Father of the Year, Bob Clagett, figures out how to DIY an air hockey table for his kids, using a shop-vac as the blower. At the end, he helpfully runs down a list of mistakes he made along the way, things you might want to do differently, et cetera:

The Search for Production Efficiency

Sandra Powell had a ton of drawers to build for her island cabinet project, and here seeks ways to increase her efficiency with several different jigs and set-ups:

DIY Barn-Style Door

Remember that shed that Linn from Darbin Orvar constructed a few weeks ago? Now she’s finishing it up, creating a barn-style door from 2×10 framing lumber ripped into components of more manageable size. She then completes the organization of the interior:

Laura’s Cargo Bike

Laura Kampf wanted some cargo space on her bike, and here she welds it up. If you’re wondering why she opted for flat instead of a basket, it was for the sake of flexibility: “I built it so you can securely attach a Systainer, a [case of beer] or a basket to it…or a passenger,” she writes.


Core77

Adding Storage to a Bicycle, Improving Your Designs Mid-Project, How to Make Parts Fit Together, a Clever DIY Camera Dolly and More

Router Bit Storage and Mid-Project Modification

This is a great example of designing on-the-fly and making adjustments when your first idea doesn’t work out. Here April Wilkerson cooks up a design for wall-mounted bit storage, and after she finds her initial concept too unstable, devises a clever way to remedy it without having to start all over:

How Much Sawdust Do They Kick Out? Tablesaw vs. Miter Saw vs. Bandsaw

Breathing in a lot of sawdust over time is no good for your long-term health. Using a device that can read airborne particle counts, Matthias Wandel compares the sawdust amounts produced by a tablesaw, miter saw and a bandsaw, showing you which produces the least and under which circumstances:

Camera Dolly Rig with Turning Capability

This week, Izzy Swan designs and builds a dolly rig for a camera—enabling it to do a curving tracking shot, using an adjustable four-wheel-steering set-up:

The Wood-Fitting Technique That Reduces Cursing By Up to 50%!

Here Jesse de Geest demonstrates a clever Japanese technique called “Killing the Wood.” This is what you do when two pieces that are supposed to fit together are off by just 1/32 of an inch:

Turned Mallet

As always, part of the fun of watching a Jimmy DiResta video is trying to figure out what he’s doing at certain points. In this one, where he makes a mallet, it wasn’t obvious to me when he started measuring the Forstner bit—then you see why later and think “Ah, of course!”

More Chainsaw Milling the Walnut Tree

Frank Howarth’s working for his wood again, continuing to turn a friend’s fallen walnut tree into slabs with a chainsaw mill:

What Kind of Wood Should You Build With?

Might be too basic for the average Core77 reader, but will be helpful for people working with wood for the first time. Steve Ramsey breaks down a basic materials question: Why use hardwood vs. softwood, plywood, or MDF?

Shop-Vac-Powered Air Hockey Table

Father of the Year, Bob Clagett, figures out how to DIY an air hockey table for his kids, using a shop-vac as the blower. At the end, he helpfully runs down a list of mistakes he made along the way, things you might want to do differently, et cetera:

The Search for Production Efficiency

Sandra Powell had a ton of drawers to build for her island cabinet project, and here seeks ways to increase her efficiency with several different jigs and set-ups:

DIY Barn-Style Door

Remember that shed that Linn from Darbin Orvar constructed a few weeks ago? Now she’s finishing it up, creating a barn-style door from 2×10 framing lumber ripped into components of more manageable size. She then completes the organization of the interior:

Laura’s Cargo Bike

Laura Kampf wanted some cargo space on her bike, and here she welds it up. If you’re wondering why she opted for flat instead of a basket, it was for the sake of flexibility: “I built it so you can securely attach a Systainer, a [case of beer] or a basket to it…or a passenger,” she writes.


Core77

Adding Storage to a Bicycle, Improving Your Designs Mid-Project, How to Make Parts Fit Together, a Clever DIY Camera Dolly and More

Router Bit Storage and Mid-Project Modification

This is a great example of designing on-the-fly and making adjustments when your first idea doesn’t work out. Here April Wilkerson cooks up a design for wall-mounted bit storage, and after she finds her initial concept too unstable, devises a clever way to remedy it without having to start all over:

How Much Sawdust Do They Kick Out? Tablesaw vs. Miter Saw vs. Bandsaw

Breathing in a lot of sawdust over time is no good for your long-term health. Using a device that can read airborne particle counts, Matthias Wandel compares the sawdust amounts produced by a tablesaw, miter saw and a bandsaw, showing you which produces the least and under which circumstances:

Camera Dolly Rig with Turning Capability

This week, Izzy Swan designs and builds a dolly rig for a camera—enabling it to do a curving tracking shot, using an adjustable four-wheel-steering set-up:

The Wood-Fitting Technique That Reduces Cursing By Up to 50%!

Here Jesse de Geest demonstrates a clever Japanese technique called “Killing the Wood.” This is what you do when two pieces that are supposed to fit together are off by just 1/32 of an inch:

Turned Mallet

As always, part of the fun of watching a Jimmy DiResta video is trying to figure out what he’s doing at certain points. In this one, where he makes a mallet, it wasn’t obvious to me when he started measuring the Forstner bit—then you see why later and think “Ah, of course!”

More Chainsaw Milling the Walnut Tree

Frank Howarth’s working for his wood again, continuing to turn a friend’s fallen walnut tree into slabs with a chainsaw mill:

What Kind of Wood Should You Build With?

Might be too basic for the average Core77 reader, but will be helpful for people working with wood for the first time. Steve Ramsey breaks down a basic materials question: Why use hardwood vs. softwood, plywood, or MDF?

Shop-Vac-Powered Air Hockey Table

Father of the Year, Bob Clagett, figures out how to DIY an air hockey table for his kids, using a shop-vac as the blower. At the end, he helpfully runs down a list of mistakes he made along the way, things you might want to do differently, et cetera:

The Search for Production Efficiency

Sandra Powell had a ton of drawers to build for her island cabinet project, and here seeks ways to increase her efficiency with several different jigs and set-ups:

DIY Barn-Style Door

Remember that shed that Linn from Darbin Orvar constructed a few weeks ago? Now she’s finishing it up, creating a barn-style door from 2×10 framing lumber ripped into components of more manageable size. She then completes the organization of the interior:

Laura’s Cargo Bike

Laura Kampf wanted some cargo space on her bike, and here she welds it up. If you’re wondering why she opted for flat instead of a basket, it was for the sake of flexibility: “I built it so you can securely attach a Systainer, a [case of beer] or a basket to it…or a passenger,” she writes.


Core77

Adding Storage to a Bicycle, Improving Your Designs Mid-Project, How to Make Parts Fit Together, a Clever DIY Camera Dolly and More

Router Bit Storage and Mid-Project Modification

This is a great example of designing on-the-fly and making adjustments when your first idea doesn’t work out. Here April Wilkerson cooks up a design for wall-mounted bit storage, and after she finds her initial concept too unstable, devises a clever way to remedy it without having to start all over:

How Much Sawdust Do They Kick Out? Tablesaw vs. Miter Saw vs. Bandsaw

Breathing in a lot of sawdust over time is no good for your long-term health. Using a device that can read airborne particle counts, Matthias Wandel compares the sawdust amounts produced by a tablesaw, miter saw and a bandsaw, showing you which produces the least and under which circumstances:

Camera Dolly Rig with Turning Capability

This week, Izzy Swan designs and builds a dolly rig for a camera—enabling it to do a curving tracking shot, using an adjustable four-wheel-steering set-up:

The Wood-Fitting Technique That Reduces Cursing By Up to 50%!

Here Jesse de Geest demonstrates a clever Japanese technique called “Killing the Wood.” This is what you do when two pieces that are supposed to fit together are off by just 1/32 of an inch:

Turned Mallet

As always, part of the fun of watching a Jimmy DiResta video is trying to figure out what he’s doing at certain points. In this one, where he makes a mallet, it wasn’t obvious to me when he started measuring the Forstner bit—then you see why later and think “Ah, of course!”

More Chainsaw Milling the Walnut Tree

Frank Howarth’s working for his wood again, continuing to turn a friend’s fallen walnut tree into slabs with a chainsaw mill:

What Kind of Wood Should You Build With?

Might be too basic for the average Core77 reader, but will be helpful for people working with wood for the first time. Steve Ramsey breaks down a basic materials question: Why use hardwood vs. softwood, plywood, or MDF?

Shop-Vac-Powered Air Hockey Table

Father of the Year, Bob Clagett, figures out how to DIY an air hockey table for his kids, using a shop-vac as the blower. At the end, he helpfully runs down a list of mistakes he made along the way, things you might want to do differently, et cetera:

The Search for Production Efficiency

Sandra Powell had a ton of drawers to build for her island cabinet project, and here seeks ways to increase her efficiency with several different jigs and set-ups:

DIY Barn-Style Door

Remember that shed that Linn from Darbin Orvar constructed a few weeks ago? Now she’s finishing it up, creating a barn-style door from 2×10 framing lumber ripped into components of more manageable size. She then completes the organization of the interior:

Laura’s Cargo Bike

Laura Kampf wanted some cargo space on her bike, and here she welds it up. If you’re wondering why she opted for flat instead of a basket, it was for the sake of flexibility: “I built it so you can securely attach a Systainer, a [case of beer] or a basket to it…or a passenger,” she writes.


Core77

Adding Storage to a Bicycle, Improving Your Designs Mid-Project, How to Make Parts Fit Together, a Clever DIY Camera Dolly and More

Router Bit Storage and Mid-Project Modification

This is a great example of designing on-the-fly and making adjustments when your first idea doesn’t work out. Here April Wilkerson cooks up a design for wall-mounted bit storage, and after she finds her initial concept too unstable, devises a clever way to remedy it without having to start all over:

How Much Sawdust Do They Kick Out? Tablesaw vs. Miter Saw vs. Bandsaw

Breathing in a lot of sawdust over time is no good for your long-term health. Using a device that can read airborne particle counts, Matthias Wandel compares the sawdust amounts produced by a tablesaw, miter saw and a bandsaw, showing you which produces the least and under which circumstances:

Camera Dolly Rig with Turning Capability

This week, Izzy Swan designs and builds a dolly rig for a camera—enabling it to do a curving tracking shot, using an adjustable four-wheel-steering set-up:

The Wood-Fitting Technique That Reduces Cursing By Up to 50%!

Here Jesse de Geest demonstrates a clever Japanese technique called “Killing the Wood.” This is what you do when two pieces that are supposed to fit together are off by just 1/32 of an inch:

Turned Mallet

As always, part of the fun of watching a Jimmy DiResta video is trying to figure out what he’s doing at certain points. In this one, where he makes a mallet, it wasn’t obvious to me when he started measuring the Forstner bit—then you see why later and think “Ah, of course!”

More Chainsaw Milling the Walnut Tree

Frank Howarth’s working for his wood again, continuing to turn a friend’s fallen walnut tree into slabs with a chainsaw mill:

What Kind of Wood Should You Build With?

Might be too basic for the average Core77 reader, but will be helpful for people working with wood for the first time. Steve Ramsey breaks down a basic materials question: Why use hardwood vs. softwood, plywood, or MDF?

Shop-Vac-Powered Air Hockey Table

Father of the Year, Bob Clagett, figures out how to DIY an air hockey table for his kids, using a shop-vac as the blower. At the end, he helpfully runs down a list of mistakes he made along the way, things you might want to do differently, et cetera:

The Search for Production Efficiency

Sandra Powell had a ton of drawers to build for her island cabinet project, and here seeks ways to increase her efficiency with several different jigs and set-ups:

DIY Barn-Style Door

Remember that shed that Linn from Darbin Orvar constructed a few weeks ago? Now she’s finishing it up, creating a barn-style door from 2×10 framing lumber ripped into components of more manageable size. She then completes the organization of the interior:

Laura’s Cargo Bike

Laura Kampf wanted some cargo space on her bike, and here she welds it up. If you’re wondering why she opted for flat instead of a basket, it was for the sake of flexibility: “I built it so you can securely attach a Systainer, a [case of beer] or a basket to it…or a passenger,” she writes.


Core77

Adding Storage to a Bicycle, Improving Your Designs Mid-Project, How to Make Parts Fit Together, a Clever DIY Camera Dolly and More

Router Bit Storage and Mid-Project Modification

This is a great example of designing on-the-fly and making adjustments when your first idea doesn’t work out. Here April Wilkerson cooks up a design for wall-mounted bit storage, and after she finds her initial concept too unstable, devises a clever way to remedy it without having to start all over:

How Much Sawdust Do They Kick Out? Tablesaw vs. Miter Saw vs. Bandsaw

Breathing in a lot of sawdust over time is no good for your long-term health. Using a device that can read airborne particle counts, Matthias Wandel compares the sawdust amounts produced by a tablesaw, miter saw and a bandsaw, showing you which produces the least and under which circumstances:

Camera Dolly Rig with Turning Capability

This week, Izzy Swan designs and builds a dolly rig for a camera—enabling it to do a curving tracking shot, using an adjustable four-wheel-steering set-up:

The Wood-Fitting Technique That Reduces Cursing By Up to 50%!

Here Jesse de Geest demonstrates a clever Japanese technique called “Killing the Wood.” This is what you do when two pieces that are supposed to fit together are off by just 1/32 of an inch:

Turned Mallet

As always, part of the fun of watching a Jimmy DiResta video is trying to figure out what he’s doing at certain points. In this one, where he makes a mallet, it wasn’t obvious to me when he started measuring the Forstner bit—then you see why later and think “Ah, of course!”

More Chainsaw Milling the Walnut Tree

Frank Howarth’s working for his wood again, continuing to turn a friend’s fallen walnut tree into slabs with a chainsaw mill:

What Kind of Wood Should You Build With?

Might be too basic for the average Core77 reader, but will be helpful for people working with wood for the first time. Steve Ramsey breaks down a basic materials question: Why use hardwood vs. softwood, plywood, or MDF?

Shop-Vac-Powered Air Hockey Table

Father of the Year, Bob Clagett, figures out how to DIY an air hockey table for his kids, using a shop-vac as the blower. At the end, he helpfully runs down a list of mistakes he made along the way, things you might want to do differently, et cetera:

The Search for Production Efficiency

Sandra Powell had a ton of drawers to build for her island cabinet project, and here seeks ways to increase her efficiency with several different jigs and set-ups:

DIY Barn-Style Door

Remember that shed that Linn from Darbin Orvar constructed a few weeks ago? Now she’s finishing it up, creating a barn-style door from 2×10 framing lumber ripped into components of more manageable size. She then completes the organization of the interior:

Laura’s Cargo Bike

Laura Kampf wanted some cargo space on her bike, and here she welds it up. If you’re wondering why she opted for flat instead of a basket, it was for the sake of flexibility: “I built it so you can securely attach a Systainer, a [case of beer] or a basket to it…or a passenger,” she writes.


Core77

Adding Storage to a Bicycle, Improving Your Designs Mid-Project, How to Make Parts Fit Together, a Clever DIY Camera Dolly and More

Router Bit Storage and Mid-Project Modification

This is a great example of designing on-the-fly and making adjustments when your first idea doesn’t work out. Here April Wilkerson cooks up a design for wall-mounted bit storage, and after she finds her initial concept too unstable, devises a clever way to remedy it without having to start all over:

How Much Sawdust Do They Kick Out? Tablesaw vs. Miter Saw vs. Bandsaw

Breathing in a lot of sawdust over time is no good for your long-term health. Using a device that can read airborne particle counts, Matthias Wandel compares the sawdust amounts produced by a tablesaw, miter saw and a bandsaw, showing you which produces the least and under which circumstances:

Camera Dolly Rig with Turning Capability

This week, Izzy Swan designs and builds a dolly rig for a camera—enabling it to do a curving tracking shot, using an adjustable four-wheel-steering set-up:

The Wood-Fitting Technique That Reduces Cursing By Up to 50%!

Here Jesse de Geest demonstrates a clever Japanese technique called “Killing the Wood.” This is what you do when two pieces that are supposed to fit together are off by just 1/32 of an inch:

Turned Mallet

As always, part of the fun of watching a Jimmy DiResta video is trying to figure out what he’s doing at certain points. In this one, where he makes a mallet, it wasn’t obvious to me when he started measuring the Forstner bit—then you see why later and think “Ah, of course!”

More Chainsaw Milling the Walnut Tree

Frank Howarth’s working for his wood again, continuing to turn a friend’s fallen walnut tree into slabs with a chainsaw mill:

What Kind of Wood Should You Build With?

Might be too basic for the average Core77 reader, but will be helpful for people working with wood for the first time. Steve Ramsey breaks down a basic materials question: Why use hardwood vs. softwood, plywood, or MDF?

Shop-Vac-Powered Air Hockey Table

Father of the Year, Bob Clagett, figures out how to DIY an air hockey table for his kids, using a shop-vac as the blower. At the end, he helpfully runs down a list of mistakes he made along the way, things you might want to do differently, et cetera:

The Search for Production Efficiency

Sandra Powell had a ton of drawers to build for her island cabinet project, and here seeks ways to increase her efficiency with several different jigs and set-ups:

DIY Barn-Style Door

Remember that shed that Linn from Darbin Orvar constructed a few weeks ago? Now she’s finishing it up, creating a barn-style door from 2×10 framing lumber ripped into components of more manageable size. She then completes the organization of the interior:

Laura’s Cargo Bike

Laura Kampf wanted some cargo space on her bike, and here she welds it up. If you’re wondering why she opted for flat instead of a basket, it was for the sake of flexibility: “I built it so you can securely attach a Systainer, a [case of beer] or a basket to it…or a passenger,” she writes.


Core77

Adding Storage to a Bicycle, Improving Your Designs Mid-Project, How to Make Parts Fit Together, a Clever DIY Camera Dolly and More

Router Bit Storage and Mid-Project Modification

This is a great example of designing on-the-fly and making adjustments when your first idea doesn’t work out. Here April Wilkerson cooks up a design for wall-mounted bit storage, and after she finds her initial concept too unstable, devises a clever way to remedy it without having to start all over:

How Much Sawdust Do They Kick Out? Tablesaw vs. Miter Saw vs. Bandsaw

Breathing in a lot of sawdust over time is no good for your long-term health. Using a device that can read airborne particle counts, Matthias Wandel compares the sawdust amounts produced by a tablesaw, miter saw and a bandsaw, showing you which produces the least and under which circumstances:

Camera Dolly Rig with Turning Capability

This week, Izzy Swan designs and builds a dolly rig for a camera—enabling it to do a curving tracking shot, using an adjustable four-wheel-steering set-up:

The Wood-Fitting Technique That Reduces Cursing By Up to 50%!

Here Jesse de Geest demonstrates a clever Japanese technique called “Killing the Wood.” This is what you do when two pieces that are supposed to fit together are off by just 1/32 of an inch:

Turned Mallet

As always, part of the fun of watching a Jimmy DiResta video is trying to figure out what he’s doing at certain points. In this one, where he makes a mallet, it wasn’t obvious to me when he started measuring the Forstner bit—then you see why later and think “Ah, of course!”

More Chainsaw Milling the Walnut Tree

Frank Howarth’s working for his wood again, continuing to turn a friend’s fallen walnut tree into slabs with a chainsaw mill:

What Kind of Wood Should You Build With?

Might be too basic for the average Core77 reader, but will be helpful for people working with wood for the first time. Steve Ramsey breaks down a basic materials question: Why use hardwood vs. softwood, plywood, or MDF?

Shop-Vac-Powered Air Hockey Table

Father of the Year, Bob Clagett, figures out how to DIY an air hockey table for his kids, using a shop-vac as the blower. At the end, he helpfully runs down a list of mistakes he made along the way, things you might want to do differently, et cetera:

The Search for Production Efficiency

Sandra Powell had a ton of drawers to build for her island cabinet project, and here seeks ways to increase her efficiency with several different jigs and set-ups:

DIY Barn-Style Door

Remember that shed that Linn from Darbin Orvar constructed a few weeks ago? Now she’s finishing it up, creating a barn-style door from 2×10 framing lumber ripped into components of more manageable size. She then completes the organization of the interior:

Laura’s Cargo Bike

Laura Kampf wanted some cargo space on her bike, and here she welds it up. If you’re wondering why she opted for flat instead of a basket, it was for the sake of flexibility: “I built it so you can securely attach a Systainer, a [case of beer] or a basket to it…or a passenger,” she writes.


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Edouard Martinet’s Masterfully Sculpted Animals And Insects Made From Bicycle, Car And Motorcycle Parts

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French artist Edouard Martinet assembles faithful interpretations of birds, crustaceans, insects, and other creatures with countless objects from discarded bicycles, cars, and household objects. A bicycle pump forms the abdomen of a dragonfly, windshield wipers serve as the legs of a fly, or the metal logos of a bicycle manufacturer are layered to create the dense scales of a fish. All the more incredible considering Martinet never welds or solders his pieces, but instead uses only screws or fasteners, selecting only the perfect components that “fit” each assemblage like a puzzle.

h/t: thisiscolossal

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Robin. Bronze, one of an edition of 12 copies, 22 x 32 x 18 cm. LEGS: springs , pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: children’s tricycle fender; FEATHERS: hood ornament of a Citroen; WINGS: petrol tank plates of a 50s motorcycle Monet-Goyon, bike chain guards; TAIL: car part, motorcycle decoration; EYES: marbles; HEAD: two seed scoops, ornaments for bike lights; BEAK: autoscope part, bike ornament.

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Dragonfly, 115 x 54 x 80 cm. ABDOMEN: bicycle pump; THORAX: four bike rear lights, two small car lights, big upholstery tacks , gas cap, ball furniture casters; HEAD: two old bike headlights, inside round sunglasses, shoe tree parts, parts of a daisy wheel for typewriter (hair from the mouth), under the head parts of acetylene bike lights; LEGS: tubes, bike cable guide, wing nuts, cream chargers; WINGS: umbrella ribs, fencing wire, aluminium metal mesh.

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Dragonfly, detail.

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Fly, 47 x 40 x 27 cm. LEGS : windshield wiper arms, bike brakes, bike chains, small typewriter parts; HEAD: motor vehicle rear light; PROBOSCIS: car hood hinge; ANTENNAE: ski boot fasteners; THORAX: motorbike headlight; On the top : 50’s kitchen utensil. WINGS: the glass is set in a windscreen brush holder, the wing ribs are made with soldering wire; ABDOMEN: motorbike headlight, part of ceiling lamp.

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Fly, detail.

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Toad

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Sardine, 25 x 70 x 11 cm. BODY: Moped chain guard covered with multiple bicycle logo badges; HEAD: Solex front fenders, car bumpers. EYES: Flashlights; GILLS: Car door parts, bicycle chain guards. TAIL: Motorbike exhaust pipe; FINS: Cake tins.

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Sardine, detail.

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Black Swift, 45 x 20 x 17 cm. LEGS: springs, pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: silver sauce jug; WINGS and FEATHERS: petrol tank plates of a 50s Villier motorcycle, bike chain guards, scooter decoration; TAIL: car decoration; EYES: metal balls; HEAD: one seed scoop, bike headlight; BEAK: dental forceps.

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Black Swift, detail.

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Praying Mantis, 104 x 50 x 74 cm. ABDOMEN: bike fender, car ventilator and ski boots fasteners; WINGS: rear lights of a Peugeot 404; HEAD: two moped indicators; TOP FORELEGS: car mirror handles, ham slicers, nutcracker handles, spaghetti tongs; FOR ALL THE LEGS: the ends are parts from bike brakes plus a bit of bike chain; THE OTHER LEGS: windshield wiper arms, aluminium tubes; THORAX: car bumper, car mirror handles.


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Brilliant Uses For Totally Useless Bike Parts

While we design wonks are out here trying to make wheels without spokes happen, real bike nerds are busy doing their own heavy-hitting BS engineering, from the labs at SRAM to the humble local bike shop. 

If you aren’t crouching on the vanguard of the bike industry you may not have heard that the end is nigh for front derailleurs, (and you may not have heard of them at all if that new Ikea bike appealed to you,) but there’s blood in the water around the clunky half of bike shifting. Anticipating the inevitable rush to toss our filthy old derailleurs, Fairdale Bikes has announced their Front Derailleur Repurposing Division in hopes of giving these noble components another chance:

Highlights include pinball flippers, a cat brusher (great for folks with allergies) and a skateboard that walks. Truly innovative! 

These creative solutions were designed by Taj Mihelich, owner of both Fairdale Bikes and a considerable record as a pro BMX rider… with some time spent at the design team for Odyssey BMX. While his design chops might pale in comparison to our own (I didn’t see a single Coroflot link or Bianchi Pista in this video), we’ll give him the benefit of the doubt since he’s clearly enthusiastic about bikes and has probably met a few proper designers along the way. Check out their other R+D reel and other videos for more fun.

Via PinkBike.


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Vintage Vespa Parts Recontextualized As Sleek Modern Office Furniture

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The sleek build of Vespa scooters have been redesigned to remain stationary, dissected and rebuilt as office furniture. Fit for an Italian motorist, the Scooter Chair, is handmade by Spanish studio Bel & Bel in a numbered series with a large variety of color combinations to choose for your office or home. Although it may appear like a normal swivel chair from the front, when turned around you can see how the curves of the vintage Vespa parts match that of the faux leather chair to create a sleek and ergonomic design.

h/t: thisiscolossal

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

An Unusual Design for a Massive Bit Holder with Moving Parts

Variety is useful for a designer to encounter, and I love seeing how different people solve a shared design problem. It’s also fun to try to figure out, absent a clear explanation, what a particular designer was thinking just by studying the form they’ve come up with.

The CNC + OCD drill bit organizer I made had a chest-of-drawers form factor because, as I explained in the design process video, that was what the object demanded; it basically designed itself. But a fellow CNC mill user named Jerry Burks, who needs to store a heckuva lot more bits than I do, came up with something very different:

Staring at just that one photo above, I couldn’t figure out some parts of the design. Assuming form follows function, the little “fingers” sticking out from the sides of each “leaf” seemed to indicate the leaves were meant to be lifted out. But then what? Those leaves could presumably could not be set down on edge or they’d topple over, and the fact that the bits load from the top mean setting it on its side would be inelegant to use. And what are those routed slots in the sides of the overall piece for?

Thankfully there was another shot, this one from the side:

Aha. Here we can clearly see there are dowels resting in the routed slots and pegged into the sides of the leaves. We can also see the tops of the side members are wavy, with the fingers resting in the valleys. Now the fingers make more sense: The leaves can indeed be lifted, but their travel is limited by the dowel in the routed slot. So it appears the leaves can only be moved forward or backward by one valley, perhaps to make access easier, or highlight which leaf is currently being used by creating space around them.

Here we can see some of the bits sitting in plastic bushings, that I imagine are friction-fit into the drilled holes:

The color-coding appears to be the sole method of “labeling,” which wouldn’t work for me; but I’m guessing Burks has a better memory than I do.

One thing I can’t figure out, by looking at that last photo above, is why there are two long slots machined into the faces of each leaf. Anyone have any ideas?


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