Tag Archives: office

Wonderful Photos Of John F. Kennedy With His Children In Halloween Costumes In The Oval Office

These wonderful family photos were taken on Halloween, 1963. President Kennedy, Caroline, and John Jr. all look like they’re having so much fun. It’s so sad to think that just three weeks later he would be killed by an assassin’s bullet in Dallas, Texas.

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John F. Kennedy, Jr., walks into the Oval Office, wearing a Halloween costume. President John F. Kennedy’s Personal Secretary, Evelyn Lincoln, stands in doorway. White House, Washington, D.C.

h/t: vintag.es

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President John F. Kennedy visits with his daughter, Caroline Kennedy (speaking on telephone, wearing Halloween costume), and niece, Maria Shriver, in the Oval Office of the White House, Washington, D.C.

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Caroline Kennedy stands in the Oval Office, wearing a Halloween costume and holding a cat. Caroline’s cousin, Maria Shriver, stands at right. White House, Washington, D.C.

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President John F. Kennedy visits with his children, Caroline Kennedy (left, holding a cat) and John F. Kennedy, Jr., in the Oval Office; the children are wearing Halloween costumes. Kennedy family dog, Wolf, is visible on far right edge of frame. White House, Washington, D.C.

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President John F. Kennedy visits with his children, Caroline Kennedy (left, holding a cat) and John F. Kennedy, Jr., in the Oval Office; the children are wearing Halloween costumes. White House, Washington, D.C.

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President John F. Kennedy laughs as his children, Caroline Kennedy (left, holding a cat) and John F. Kennedy, Jr., model their Halloween costumes. Oval Office, White House, Washington, D.C.

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Caroline Kennedy holds a cat in the office of President John F. Kennedy’s Personal Secretary, Evelyn Lincoln. White House, Washington, D.C.

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Caroline Kennedy, John F. Kennedy, Jr., and Maria Shriver (holding a cat) play in the office of President John F. Kennedy’s Personal Secretary, Evelyn Lincoln. Kennedy family dog, Wolf, stands in background. White House, Washington, D.C.


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Wonderful Photos Of John F. Kennedy With His Children In Halloween Costumes In The Oval Office

These wonderful family photos were taken on Halloween, 1963. President Kennedy, Caroline, and John Jr. all look like they’re having so much fun. It’s so sad to think that just three weeks later he would be killed by an assassin’s bullet in Dallas, Texas.

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John F. Kennedy, Jr., walks into the Oval Office, wearing a Halloween costume. President John F. Kennedy’s Personal Secretary, Evelyn Lincoln, stands in doorway. White House, Washington, D.C.

h/t: vintag.es

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President John F. Kennedy visits with his daughter, Caroline Kennedy (speaking on telephone, wearing Halloween costume), and niece, Maria Shriver, in the Oval Office of the White House, Washington, D.C.

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Caroline Kennedy stands in the Oval Office, wearing a Halloween costume and holding a cat. Caroline’s cousin, Maria Shriver, stands at right. White House, Washington, D.C.

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President John F. Kennedy visits with his children, Caroline Kennedy (left, holding a cat) and John F. Kennedy, Jr., in the Oval Office; the children are wearing Halloween costumes. Kennedy family dog, Wolf, is visible on far right edge of frame. White House, Washington, D.C.

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President John F. Kennedy visits with his children, Caroline Kennedy (left, holding a cat) and John F. Kennedy, Jr., in the Oval Office; the children are wearing Halloween costumes. White House, Washington, D.C.

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President John F. Kennedy laughs as his children, Caroline Kennedy (left, holding a cat) and John F. Kennedy, Jr., model their Halloween costumes. Oval Office, White House, Washington, D.C.

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Caroline Kennedy holds a cat in the office of President John F. Kennedy’s Personal Secretary, Evelyn Lincoln. White House, Washington, D.C.

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Caroline Kennedy, John F. Kennedy, Jr., and Maria Shriver (holding a cat) play in the office of President John F. Kennedy’s Personal Secretary, Evelyn Lincoln. Kennedy family dog, Wolf, stands in background. White House, Washington, D.C.


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Wonderful Photos Of John F. Kennedy With His Children In Halloween Costumes In The Oval Office

These wonderful family photos were taken on Halloween, 1963. President Kennedy, Caroline, and John Jr. all look like they’re having so much fun. It’s so sad to think that just three weeks later he would be killed by an assassin’s bullet in Dallas, Texas.

1

John F. Kennedy, Jr., walks into the Oval Office, wearing a Halloween costume. President John F. Kennedy’s Personal Secretary, Evelyn Lincoln, stands in doorway. White House, Washington, D.C.

h/t: vintag.es

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President John F. Kennedy visits with his daughter, Caroline Kennedy (speaking on telephone, wearing Halloween costume), and niece, Maria Shriver, in the Oval Office of the White House, Washington, D.C.

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Caroline Kennedy stands in the Oval Office, wearing a Halloween costume and holding a cat. Caroline’s cousin, Maria Shriver, stands at right. White House, Washington, D.C.

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President John F. Kennedy visits with his children, Caroline Kennedy (left, holding a cat) and John F. Kennedy, Jr., in the Oval Office; the children are wearing Halloween costumes. Kennedy family dog, Wolf, is visible on far right edge of frame. White House, Washington, D.C.

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President John F. Kennedy visits with his children, Caroline Kennedy (left, holding a cat) and John F. Kennedy, Jr., in the Oval Office; the children are wearing Halloween costumes. White House, Washington, D.C.

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President John F. Kennedy laughs as his children, Caroline Kennedy (left, holding a cat) and John F. Kennedy, Jr., model their Halloween costumes. Oval Office, White House, Washington, D.C.

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Caroline Kennedy holds a cat in the office of President John F. Kennedy’s Personal Secretary, Evelyn Lincoln. White House, Washington, D.C.

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Caroline Kennedy, John F. Kennedy, Jr., and Maria Shriver (holding a cat) play in the office of President John F. Kennedy’s Personal Secretary, Evelyn Lincoln. Kennedy family dog, Wolf, stands in background. White House, Washington, D.C.


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

How to Combat Your Workplace’s Distracting Open Office Plan 

You know what they say, the grass is always greener on the other side. These days in the workplace, there is one example of something many never thought they would miss, until it was gone—cubicles. Yes, cubicles, those sad monotonous structures symbolic of our workplace oppression. Your own personal cave where you could privately wallow in your case of ‘the Mondays’. 

Well this is bleak.

The past few years have proclaimed the dawn of the open-plan office revolution, but statistics are beginning to point to the idea that workers actually seem to be missing the dismal cubicle culture due to the collective feeling that they lack privacy within the workplace. A fascinating workplace survey conducted by Gensler with over 1,200 UK office workers in 11 different industries shows that effectiveness ratings in the workplace decrease the more people you share an office with and the less privacy you have at your workspace. 

In our Core77 discussion boards, designer wireframinghammer drives home this growing frustration among workers: 

“I work at a medium sized consultancy. It is fast paced, good range of ID and UX, and I love everything about it. Except the open office layout. There is also a lot of constant noise as you might expect, and anything that requires a lot of focus (like building a complicated tech pack or some involved UI in Illustrator) is slowed down a LOT. The zero privacy also makes you feel like you are in a fish tank. Sadly enough, I do prefer the drab cubicle that I had at a previous job to this, although this job is better in every other way.

Sometimes I try to take my laptop into a meeting room, but I don’t want to work the majority of my time there, as that wouldn’t be seen as being a “team player.” Wearing headphones 90% of the day would be bad for the same reason too. Besides these meeting rooms, we only have solo offices for our founders, so I don’t think it would be as simple as finding an empty room to make my own.

I’ve looked up dozens of articles about how the open office was supposed to promote creativity and collaboration, but has failed at that and caused resentment … and I can attest (as I am sure many of you have also!). It seems like the ideal space would have open areas for people to work together, but individual areas that you can focus in[…]thought I would join and ask if anyone else has had this problem, and how they approached it.”

The data in Gensler’s work survey shows that “open plan environments can be just as effective, if not more effective, as more enclosed ones,” so what are the factors that can result in this more highly effective environment, and how can offices use design in order to optimize these open office plans? How can individual workers empower themselves to become more productive and get the most out of their workspace?

Here are, according to several surveys, a number of issues to look at when trying to improve the open office environment.

Sense of Privacy

Director of Steelcase’s WorkSpace Futures research program Donna Flynn says that “a lot of businesses are now struggling with the balance of private and open spaces. There’s mounting evidence that the lack of privacy is causing people to feel overexposed in today’s workplaces and is threatening people’s engagement and their cognitive, emotional and even physical wellbeing.” There is certainly merit to an open space as research has shown, but also giving an employee the feeling that there’s somewhere to escape to if they need to focus. 

Workbays by Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec (Vitra, 2012) 

Modular private spaces seem to be the answer to this issue in the open-plan office, shown in examples like the Bouroullec’s Workbay system. 

Images via Mike&Maaike (2013)

There are also solutions in existence that can be found in simple furniture pieces that create a perceived sense of privacy, like the Windowseat Lounge by designers Mike&Maaike for Haworth. 

Noise Levels

According to a recent Oxford Economics survey on the open workplace, 64% of those surveyed said blocking out noise and distractions increased their overall productivity and focus. In an open office plan, visuals and noise can equally count for these distractions. So how can designers use their skills to improve issues revolving around noise cancellation or a generally more peaceful soundscape?

FOLD by Siri Skillgate via Lund School of Industrial Design (2016)

Sometimes these revisions can be done without object based solutions, but instead designed systems, such as a ‘no talking’ zone. In other instances, easy material solutions can make for highly effective results. One example from Lund University’s graduate exhibition last spring at Milan Design Week called FOLD demonstrated a simple solution to a complex problem with a series of beautiful fabric panels that helped to absorb surrounding sounds while also helping workers avoid visual distractions. 

Lack of Choice

Finally, another larger issue in office spaces is the inability to adapt to your task and level of focus needed to accomplish that task. As shown in the Gensler survey, over 70% of respondents said they had no choice in when and where they could work each day. As reflected in the survey, the more options an employees has in where they can work, the more likely they are to succeed and innovate within the organization. 

Air BnB’s office space in London

One solution to combat this problem in an office space is to do away with assigned seating and create zones, allowing people to work how they want when they want.

Humanscale‘s adjustable sit/stand desk system 

Another interesting find via Gensler was that amongst those surveyed, staff with higher innovation scores used sit/stand desks three times more than those with lower scores—could standing desks be the solution to keep employees engaged and on their toes? 

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How do you feel about open office plans? What would be your design solution to one or many of these open office plan problems? Voice your opinion in the comment feed below or the original discussion board post.

(You can also check out some great freelance furniture solutions from our recent 1-Hour Design Challenge for inspiration!)


Core77

Post-It War Gets Sticky On New York City Office Windows

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Images created with Post-it notes are seen in the windows of offices at 75 Varick Street in lower Manhattan, New York, U.S., May 18, 2016, where advertising agencies and other companies have started what is being called a “Post-it note art war” with employees creating colorful images in their windows with Post-it notes. Photos by Mike Segar / Reuters.

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Office on Wheels Update: Coroflot’s Preliminary Structure

Over the last ten days, the soon-to-be Coroflot office has transformed from a floor on wheels to, well, something that’s truly on it’s way to becoming an office.

Standing in front of the trailer, now with beams raised, a polished floor, and a panel of polycarbonate giving us a sense of what will become the walls, Laurence and I talked about the choice of “plastic walls.”

Having been “enamored with walls that let in light,” Laurence was keen on finding an affordable material to feed that enchantment, and polycarbonate was the answer. A material typically used to build greenhouses, Laurence was concerned the Coroflot team was headed for an office sauna of sorts. But after some research, we know the office will match the surrounding temperature, so for now, in the garage, the Coroflot office will be comfortable for everyone, not just cool season crops.

The build has been relatively quick, thanks in large part to the talented lead builder, Caleb Roach. The trailer is just 280 sq. feet, so each element of the build can usually be executed in a single day, whether it’s been flooring or raising the beams. So what’s next? Laurence is looking to finish cross-bracing exterior cladding and the roof (yes, all of this) in the next couple weeks.

As Laurence went through drawings and renderings, now in the shadow of an actual structure, it’s clear she’s developing this project and process with the idea that it’s a prototype—the first of many structures like this and one that can serve as a model going forward. She’s certainly discovering the build as it progresses, and that seems to offer both a challenge and a source of excitement and inspiration. And with excitement, she assures me her next drawings will be of the interior.

“I want to design a state of the art workplace environment. That’s where my head’s at right now.”

Check out Laurence’s design work here.

Written by Jeff Rutherford, originally for Hand-Eye Supply


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11 Illustrations That Describe Life In The Office Perfectly

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Many of us spend a large part of our lives in the office. And every office has its own tradition and features: the beginning of the day, the lunch rituals, the different relationships we have with our colleagues. However, there are some common situations that almost every office worker faces.

h/t: brightside. Artworks by Anna Syrovatkina.

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Vintage Vespa Parts Recontextualized As Sleek Modern Office Furniture

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The sleek build of Vespa scooters have been redesigned to remain stationary, dissected and rebuilt as office furniture. Fit for an Italian motorist, the Scooter Chair, is handmade by Spanish studio Bel & Bel in a numbered series with a large variety of color combinations to choose for your office or home. Although it may appear like a normal swivel chair from the front, when turned around you can see how the curves of the vintage Vespa parts match that of the faux leather chair to create a sleek and ergonomic design.

h/t: thisiscolossal

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Nissan’s Self-Organizing Office Furniture

It’s not quite Tesla’s Autopilot, but Nissan has been developing a automotive feature called Intelligent Parking Assist. The system was developed with the thought that drivers would be tired after a long journey, and could benefit from having the car take care of the last few feet. Frivolous? Perhaps, but leave it up to quirky Japanese engineers to see a parallel between a self-parking car…and a messy office.

Operating under the idea that office workers are too busy or tired to tidy up after a meeting, Nissan’s engineers amusingly rigged up a bunch of office chairs with their system:

The inventor of The Clapper can’t be happy.

So how does it work? You saw the diagram with the Wi-Fi, what does that have to do with it? Here are some more details, as well as a demonstration of how it works in a car:

Okay, so perhaps “Intelligent Parking Assist” is a bit of a misnomer, as the ultimate locations must be pre-programmed. But it’s hard not to love the spectacle of chairs bustling back to their designated spaces.

What we think Nissan oughta do next: Combine the self-parking chairs with Roombas. Then the office would be really tidy.


Core77

Nissan Debuts Self-Organizing Office Furniture!

It’s not quite Tesla’s Autopilot, but Nissan has been developing a automotive feature called Intelligent Parking Assist. The system was developed with the thought that drivers would be tired after a long journey, and could benefit from having the car take care of the last few feet. Frivolous? Perhaps, but leave it up to quirky Japanese engineers to see a parallel between a self-parking car…and a messy office.

Operating under the idea that office workers are too busy or tired to tidy up after a meeting, Nissan’s engineers amusingly rigged up a bunch of office chairs with their system:

The inventor of The Clapper can’t be happy.

So how does it work? You saw the diagram with the Wi-Fi, what does that have to do with it? Here are some more details, as well as a demonstration of how it works in a car:

Okay, so perhaps “Intelligent Parking Assist” is a bit of a misnomer, as the ultimate locations must be pre-programmed. But it’s hard not to love the spectacle of chairs bustling back to their designated spaces.

What we think Nissan oughta do next: Combine the self-parking chairs with Roombas. Then the office would be really tidy.


Core77

Organizing the Office: Desks With Storage

Many desks on the market now are basically tabletops; there are no drawers or other storage mechanisms. But as I’ve noted before, many end users still need to keep a few things besides a computer close at hand—pencils, notepads, files, paper clips, etc. And there are many ways to design a desk to provide a bit of storage for such users.

The Mateodesk from Ligne Roset, designed by Marc Berthier, provides storage at the rear of the desk. The optional drawers are nice for end users who like things hidden away; those who like their storage more visible can just use the cubbies without the drawers.

Cabling has been considered, too. As Ligne Roset explains, “The central space between the drawers is closed by two removable covers, facilitating connections and concealing the multiway plug and cabling.”

The only drawbacks: Since the storage compartments take a fair amount of desktop space, there’s less space available for a large item. And the end user needs to reach around anything that’s on the desktop to get to the storage. This is a desk that’s best for someone who will be using a laptop and no other computer or monitor.

The Esme desk, available from Made, also uses rear storage. Its cabling solution is simpler, with a big round hole to run cords through. That will work fine for many end users, but some will find it inelegant—and anyone who was looking for a desk to use without any computer would probably give this one a pass. The back of the desk extends a bit above the back shelf, which may help keep things from falling off.

The Origami desk is part of the Mr. Marius collection from Ethnicraft. It combines rear storage with a few drawers, and it seems to also have a shelf under the desktop where a laptop could be stored when not in use. (Of course, other things could be stashed there, too.) Having multiple storage options of varying sizes is nice; the front drawers are large enough to hold stationery and other paper. 

However, laptop users will note that this desk does not provide any accommodation for cables. Given the enclosed nature of the desktop, that could be awkward (unless the end user is okay with drilling a hole or two). Maybe that’s why the company’s photos show the desk with a typewriter, not a computer.

The Brunel desk from Heal’s, designed by Rob Scarlett, combines drawers with a rear shelf. That shelf (which is 15 cm deep, a bit under 6 inches) won’t work for all end users; anyone with a cat can imagine how things will get knocked off on a regular basis. 

The Cosimo desk from Adentro provides storage with both a shelf and some drawers. That center section can be either tempered glass or more of the lacquered finish, so the storage can be more or less hidden, as suits the end user’s organizing style.

The drawers have a pencil/pen tray, which is a nice touch. I might have preferred that tray be a bit larger, though, so it could easily fit more than one pen.

The Cupertino desk from BoConcept provides both storage and cable management.

The storage compartments lift up; the center section is hanged, while the side compartments have removable lids. Two types of end users might find these awkward to use: those who tend to spread papers and other items all over the desktop when they work and those who want to put something heavy (such as a computer monitor) on the desk. But the compartments provide a lot of storage for those who wouldn’t have either of those issues.

Note: Those grey items behind the storage compartments  are the optional Bluetooth-enabled speakers.

The removable cover sections in the center rear make it easy to deal with any cables. 

The Wynd writing desk from Piet Houtenbos uses a storage tray rather than a drawer. There’s no need to push away from the desk to get to the items stored, as there would be with a center drawer. It’s an interesting design, but no one I know is really bothered by the process of opening a center drawer.

The Brooklyn desk from Oeuf uses movable storage boxes of varying sizes placed around the perimeter. This is a child’s desk (which can adjust in height up to adult size), but there’s no reason the same clever design couldn’t be used on a standard adult desk.

The Inlandsis desk, designed by Mathilde Roman and Pauline Androlus, keeps everything on the desktop—but it uses pegs of varying heights to keep things upright rather than horizontal. That won’t work for everything—spare printer paper, for example, is better stored flat. It’s better suited to storing things like files and books, and perhaps incoming mail. 

But there’s a limit to the flexibility, since of course the pegs can only go in the designated places—so the end user might not be able to create a space as narrow or as wide as desired. And if not all the pegs are used, the end user would have little holes in the desktop surface. All in all, this design could require a lot of fiddling around to make things work; using things like bookends and desktop files might be a lot simpler and more effective.


Core77

Home Office Happy Hour: A Desk That Transforms Into a Bar

For those that telecommute or work from home, the division between work and life can be tricky. When are you off the clock? Designer Jonathan Odom has devised a physical signifier that makes the transition clear: His desk transforms, at day’s end, into a bar.

The design includes a cork-backed wall at the back of the desk that pivots on wooden dowel posts on the sides of the desk. Simply pull the desk away from the wall, fold down the back wall, and it becomes a bar with seating for 3 at stools. A trough at the back of the desk (hidden by the bar top when it’s down) has room for 20+ bottles, a shelf for bar wear, and a recessed nook for an ice bucket or cutting board.

Odom, who’s a full-time designer at the Instructables Design Studio, has both posted an Instructable on how to build your own Transforming Bar Desk. He’s also selling them here in a variety of prices and material choices, from $ 975 for a flatpack version in birch plywood up to $ 2,500 for a pre-assembled version in zebrawood-veneered plywood.


Core77

Galaxy’s Greatest Untrained Modelmaker Builds Star Wars Replicas Out of Office Supplies

I saw The Force Awakens on Friday, and I can’t talk about it. I didn’t want to see it so early, but as someone who spends a lot of time on the internet for work, I was already coming across spoilers last week and figured I’d better see it before it was ruined. And I don’t want to spoil anything for those of you that haven’t seen it yet.

So all I can talk about is this: In the original Star Wars, perhaps the galaxy’s greatest Jedi knight was toiling away in obscurity on a moisture farm. Here on Earth, perhaps one of the country’s greatest modelmakers has been toiling away in obscurity in a call center.

That man’s name is Jeremy Brumage, and while the Force is apparently strong with him, fielding calls from a cubicle didn’t give him a lot of chance to exercise it. So between calls, the veteran Star Wars fan began assembling shockingly faithful vehicle models from the franchise—out of office supplies.

The level of detail is incredible.

According to his local news network:

“Scrap materials. Each one has paperclips, folders, staples. Then some more complicated parts would be like telephone headset pieces, that you know, [a co-worker’s] headset would break and they’d start giving me pieces,” Brummage said. “Then to make the stands, I used either a marker or a highlighter and cut that in half and used the lid to plug it in and let them stand up that way.”

Brummage also used coffee stirrers, thumb tacks and pencil erasers to make the models. Pens were used to make up the laser cannons on the X-Wing Fighter. Markers make up the thrust engines.

To those of you working at an ID firm that still has an actual modelmaking shop: You need to step up, become this man’s Ben Kenobi, snatch him up out of that call center and teach him the ways of The Force. Meet me at the bar, I’ll tell you how fast my car is, then drive you guys back to your studio.


Core77

A Folding Table that Sets Up Like a Sniper Rifle and an Office in a Bubble

Part of the “thrill” of traveling to a new freelance design gig was wondering, as I crossed the lobby, what my new temporary workstation was going to look like. Would I get shafted with a card table in the corner, be assigned to a windowless cubicle featuring lunch crumbs from the last tenant, or be placed on one of those wonky communal desks?

How intimidating would it be to your new clients if you showed up with your laptop in one hand, and in the other, your own darn desk stowed away in this case:

Designed by Paris-based Dai Sugasawa, the military-inspired Bipod Table looks more than a little like a sniper rifle set-up.

The Bipod table was conceived with the help of military equipment specialists who used precision engineering to achieve design efficiency. The Bipod’s form is the sum of its functions: represented as they are, with exposed parts that emphasize the table’s mechanical beauty.

Weighing approximately 10kg, the table is easy to carry or transport, and is fully foldable with adjustable height and a retraction mechanism. Made up of 99 per cent alumiunium, the Bipod is lightweight, compact, and fully recyclable. The Bipod encourages improvisation: it can be used anywhere, and at any time, adapting its function to a variety of spaces and circumstances. The Bipod’s modern industrial aesthetic allows for a stylish solution to the needs of every day life.

It would be cool to finish the gig, then break your desk down, dramatically snap the case shut, and demand that your client wire the money into your Swiss account, like you’re The Jackal.

The thing I haven’t worked out is where to get the tabletop from on-site, as I don’t see any room for it in the case. I guess your histrionics would lose a little something if you set the table up, then have to scrounge some foamcore boards from the supply closet to form your worksurface.

Another cool Sugasawa project is his Dome Office:

Unfortunately the project page features no description whatsoever, so I’m not sure what the intended application or knockdown capacity is. But I so want to build one of these in my apartment.

Check out the rest of Sugasawa’s book here.


Core77

New Chrome Beta extension from Google lets you view Office files directly in the browser

New Chrome Beta extension from Google lets you view Office files directly in the browser

One of the more unique features of Google’s web browser for Chromebooks has been the ability to open and view Microsoft Office files directly in the browser (as opposed to pushing them to Drive), but that’s so far remained confined to those devices. Google’s decided to change that today, though, releasing a new extension for Chrome Beta that allows the same functionality in the browser for Windows and Mac. There’s no indication yet as to when it will make it to the stable release of Chrome, but beta users can install the extension now at the source link below.

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Via: TechCrunch

Source: Chrome Web Store, Google Chrome Blog

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New Chrome Beta extension from Google lets you view Office files directly in the browser