Tag Archives: nearly

Breaking records, enterprise fundings are up nearly 80% in Q1 2017

 After a lackluster year for enterprise technology venture capital investments, 2017 kicked off with a record breaking quarter for enterprise technology startups. Following 4 straight quarters of decreasing investment, investors poured a record-breaking $ 5 billion dollars into enterprise technology startups in the first quarter of 2017 alone – a nearly 80% increase from the previous… Read More


TechCrunch

Artist Unveils A Monumental Pen & Ink Drawing Nearly 3.5 Years In The Making

1

The 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan was one of the most devastating environmental events of our time, with its overall impact rippling across the globe for years to come. But just as stated in Newton’s third law—for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction—so too did the people of Japan respond to the magnitude of the destruction in an effort to rebuild their country anew as captured in this staggering new artwork by Manabu Ikeda titled Rebirth.

More info: Manabu Ikeda (h/t: colossal)

2

Starting in July of 2013, Ikeda toiled away on the 13 x 10 foot piece for 10 hours a day inside a basement studio at the Chazen Museum of Art in Madison, Wisconsin. He finished work just last week.

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

“Holy Cow” Video: Tree Spontaneously Splits and Disintegrates, Nearly Killing Logger

Wood grain is a funny thing, and most of us know that lumber contains all sorts of bound-up tension within it. On a good day, you’ll cut a board, release those waiting forces and it will warp out of shape, ruining your project. On a bad day, you’ll cut into it and the resulting forces will almost kill you, like this:

If you full-screen it, you can see the precise moment the crack develops. Talk about scary. You can see the poor guy doesn’t even know which way to run, and prudently abandoned his chainsaw.

What happened here is similar to what lumberjacks refer to as a tree pulling a “barber chair.” Here’s a more classic example:

The nickname comes from the classic barber’s chair, whereby a man is made to recline in it for a shave; if you envision the act—the legs swinging up and the torso leaning back over the pivot point of the chair’s central post—the moniker makes sense.

When a tree goes barber chair, obviously the potential lumber within it is ruined. But the more serious problem, of course, is the loss of human life. Even experienced arborists and lumberjacks have been killed by such incidents, and as you can imagine, the deaths are typically grisly.

Canadian website Arboriculture explains what causes these incidents to happen:

…A barber chair occurs when using conventional back-cuts where the hinge is formed by cutting the wood from the back of the tree towards the hinge. As the saw severs the more resilient sapwood fibres typically found in the outer rings of a tree, the more brittle heartwood must resist the bending load. In cases of heavy forward lean and in older trees, this can result in the hinge wood splitting upwards as the tree falls. When the tree top contacts the ground the section of tree that has split upwards crushes either the remaining wood column straight backwards or the split standing section tears and rolls off to either side. In either case, the best place to be is away and at an angle.

If you look hard enough, you can find videos online of graphic barber chair accidents. We won’t post them here because that’s not our bag. But if you’re an inexperienced DIY’er cutting a tree down in your backyard, please use caution, do your research, and/or consider hiring a pro.


Core77

“Holy Cow” Video: Tree Spontaneously Splits and Disintegrates, Nearly Killing Logger

Wood grain is a funny thing, and most of us know that lumber contains all sorts of bound-up tension within it. On a good day, you’ll cut a board, release those waiting forces and it will warp out of shape, ruining your project. On a bad day, you’ll cut into it and the resulting forces will almost kill you, like this:

If you full-screen it, you can see the precise moment the crack develops. Talk about scary. You can see the poor guy doesn’t even know which way to run, and prudently abandoned his chainsaw.

What happened here is similar to what lumberjacks refer to as a tree pulling a “barber chair.” Here’s a more classic example:

The nickname comes from the classic barber’s chair, whereby a man is made to recline in it for a shave; if you envision the act—the legs swinging up and the torso leaning back over the pivot point of the chair’s central post—the moniker makes sense.

When a tree goes barber chair, obviously the potential lumber within it is ruined. But the more serious problem, of course, is the loss of human life. Even experienced arborists and lumberjacks have been killed by such incidents, and as you can imagine, the deaths are typically grisly.

Canadian website Arboriculture explains what causes these incidents to happen:

…A barber chair occurs when using conventional back-cuts where the hinge is formed by cutting the wood from the back of the tree towards the hinge. As the saw severs the more resilient sapwood fibres typically found in the outer rings of a tree, the more brittle heartwood must resist the bending load. In cases of heavy forward lean and in older trees, this can result in the hinge wood splitting upwards as the tree falls. When the tree top contacts the ground the section of tree that has split upwards crushes either the remaining wood column straight backwards or the split standing section tears and rolls off to either side. In either case, the best place to be is away and at an angle.

If you look hard enough, you can find videos online of graphic barber chair accidents. We won’t post them here because that’s not our bag. But if you’re an inexperienced DIY’er cutting a tree down in your backyard, please use caution, do your research, and/or consider hiring a pro.


Core77

Watch a motorcycle racer nearly rub the wall at Macau’s track

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

Watch motorcycle racer John McGuinness nearly scrape the wall around the claustrophobically tight Macau Grand Prix circuit.

Continue reading Watch a motorcycle racer nearly rub the wall at Macau’s track

Watch a motorcycle racer nearly rub the wall at Macau’s track originally appeared on Autoblog on Sat, 09 Apr 2016 18:55:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments
Autoblog

Matt LeBlanc nearly runs over cameraman during Top Gear shoot

Filed under: , ,

New Top Gear host Matt LeBlanc avoided a serious accident when he almost ran over a cameraman who was laying on the ground filming. The former Friends star was reportedly upset afterward and needed to take a short break from shooting.

Continue reading Matt LeBlanc nearly runs over cameraman during Top Gear shoot

Matt LeBlanc nearly runs over cameraman during Top Gear shoot originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 04 Apr 2016 10:25:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments
Autoblog

Timeless New York Street Scenes Photographs In The 1950s, Found In A Home’s Attic After Nearly 50 Years

0

These vintage photographs capture a timeless energy and diversity that is characteristic of the sleepless streets of New York City. The recently discovered antique portraits showcase the city in the midst of the 1950’s, as seen through the Rolleiflex lens of the undiscovered photographer Frank Larson. While digging through his aunt’s attic, where Larson stowed away his images in 1964, the photographer’s grandson found this remarkable collection of street scenes that give a candid glimpse into the history of the big city.

In the 1950’s, Larson worked as an auditor in Queens and had a great knack for capturing beautiful moments in everyday life. Known as the “family shutterbug,” photography was a creative outlet that provided relief from the stresses of his 9 to 5 banking job. On the weekends, he would leave home early in the morning on expeditions to explore the city and photograph the life he saw, from Chinatown to Central Park. Throughout his lifetime, his talent was hardly recognized other than at a few local amateur competitions. After Larson passed away, due to a stroke, his images laid dormant, lost for nearly 50 years. Now having resurfaced, Larson’s extensive collection of thousands of black and white pieces are in the care of the Queens Museum of Art and are receiving the recognition they deserve.

Three young ladies prepare to have their pictures taken in Manhattan photo booths in April 1954.

1
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A rainy day across from St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

2
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A rainy evening in New York’s Times Square under the neon lights of the “Black Widow” marquee.

3
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A group of businessmen huddle together at the window of the Associated Press office at Rockefeller Center to read the latest news, 1955.

4
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

The Chrysler Building is reflected in a sidewalk puddle on 42nd St. in April 1954.

5
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

Two men chat in a coffee shop window near Times Square in April 1954.

6
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A Ballantine beer truck stops to make a delivery in front of the NBC Television Theatre.

7
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A street performer promotes the film “Johnny Guitar” on the sidewalks of Times Square in Spring, 1954.

8
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A woman suns herself outside the entrance to the New York Public Library in 1955.

9
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A group poses for a picture at Pier 86, on 46th Street.

10
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

Professional skaters make a gutsy move in this shot, taken at the Rockefeller Center rink.

11
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

Two parade officials watch New York’s Saint Patrick’s Day parade pass by on Fifth Avenue as one of them sneaks a cigarette break.

12
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

The view from the top of a Rockefeller Center escalator looks out onto Fifth Avenue.

18
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A candid moment of school girls in 1953.

13
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

Cops, delivery men, construction workers, cooks, cobblers and kids, just going about their business.

14
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A man works on New York City souvenirs with his sewing machine in November 1954.

15
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

A woman peers out from a ticket booth of a movie theater in New York’s Times Square in 1954.

16
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art

Pigeons gather in Times Square on a rainy day in 1954.

17
Frank Oscar Larson Photography / Courtesy of Queens Museum of Art. h/t: vintag.es, mymodernmet, today


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.