Tag Archives: Matters

Design Experience that Matters: How to Build a Z-Rack Whiteboard and Save $150

Every design studio goes through mountains of post-it notes while brainstorming and charting ideas. We love the portability of flip-chart posters, but even after moving to a big studio in Salem we never had enough wall space.

Then we found Make Space by Scott Doorley and Scott Witthoft at the Stanford’s d-school. Their design for a DIY whiteboard made from a garment z-rack was perfect: the wheels meant we could park them anywhere in the studio, and the bases nest together to reduce clutter. Building them ourselves saved money, which is great because we’re a cheapskate nonprofit and we wanted ten of them.

We made a short video to show you how we modified the Stanford z-rack whiteboard design, and to share some of the accessories we designed to make the z-racks even more useful. You can also find our HOWTO guide on Instructables. We’ve shared the z-rack parts as Autodesk Inventor and STL parts on Thingiverse so you can modify and print them yourself.


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Design Experience That Matters, Book Review: The Back of the Napkin

Cartoons! They carpet the walls of our studio, and they make frequent appearances in Design that Matters presentations and TED talks. In his 2009 book, The Back of the Napkin, design thinker and professional doodler Dan Roam demonstrates how simple cartoons can help us to explain and visualize complex concepts, brainstorm more effectively and extract meaning from piles of data.

The Back of the Napkin argues that if you can draw a smiley face and a stick figure, you’re ready to become a visual thinker. The book demonstrates how even simple doodles can help ideas jump off the page.

DtM’s value is expressed in terms of novel solutions to tough problems. Where powerpoint slides and bullet points can lead to anxiety and boredom, drawing cartoons makes people happy. Happy people are more creative. Creativity pays the bills at DtM.

But there’s more! We’ve found loads of resources describing human-centered design research methods, including IDEO’s Method Cards and the LUMA Institute’s Innovating for People. Back of the Napkin is the first book we found that explains the kinds of visual “frameworks” we use for data-reduction. Frameworks help us to organize the enormous undifferentiated mass of observations and insights we collect during field research. Frameworks lead to qualitative design principles, and then to quantitative product requirements and specifications. Roam’s framework examples on pages 130-133 are worth the price of the book.

And if you buy this or any of the other books through the links in this email, Amazon will send part of the proceeds to DtM!

[The Back of the Napkin]

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This “Design Experience that Matters” series is provided courtesy of Timothy Prestero and the team at Design that Matters (DtM). As a nonprofit, DtM collaborates with leading social entrepreneurs and hundreds of volunteers to design new medical technologies for the poor in developing countries. DtM’s Firefly infant phototherapy device is treating thousands of newborns in 21 counties from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In 2012, DtM was named the winner of the National Design Award.


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Design Experience That Matters: Video of Our Design Sprint

Last summer, with support from the Autodesk Foundation and Lenovo, we recruited a student design team to develop an alpha prototype of our Otter Newborn Warmer. Malory Johnson, Industrial Design Fellow, joined DtM from the Columbus College of Art & Design. Karan Chaitanya Mudgal, Industrial Design Fellow, joined DtM from NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Kristine Chen, Mechanical Engineering Design Fellow, is a recent graduate of Stanford University. To support the team on the research end, we also recruited Kristen Moulton, Clinical Fellow, a second-year medical school student who had previously worked as a Research Coordinator for the NIH.

Video first, description afterwards:

The summer design sprint started with a couple weeks of orientation at the DtM studio in Salem. This included a review of the project context and background,the product requirements and specifications and the existing CAD models and physical design concepts. The team then hit the road for a series of expert interviews, both at local neonatal intensive care units and with local manufacturers.

The team then dove into concept brainstorming, some hand-sketching and lots of CAD modeling in Fusion 360. In July, the team moved to the new Autodesk BUILD Space in South Boston for alpha prototype fabrication and testing. The Autodesk BUILD Space team were superlative hosts.

After a series of late nights and endless hours sawing, sanding and soldering, the team finished the Otter alpha prototype. It’s a huge step forward for our newborn warmer program. We’re excited to continue Otter development this Fall with a student design-for-manufacture team at Olin College, and to begin field-testing the device overseas later this year.

Student design team lead Malory Johnson, who moonlights as a video producer, put together this fantastic two-minute speed-run through the summer design sprint.


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Design Experience that Matters: How to Create a Rubber Prototype Using a 3D-Printed Mold

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This “Design Experience that Matters” series is provided courtesy of Timothy Prestero and the team at Design that Matters (DtM). As a nonprofit, DtM collaborates with leading social entrepreneurs and hundreds of volunteers to design new medical technologies for the poor in developing countries. DtM’s Firefly infant phototherapy device is treating thousands of newborns in 21 counties from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In 2012, DtM was named the winner of the National Design Award.


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Design Experience that Matters: How to Create a Killer Design Portfolio

Building a portfolio is one of the most challenging parts of pursuing a career in design. On one hand, there’s no strict formula and no defined requirements, but on the other hand, we’re creatives. Isn’t that supposed to be where we thrive? In six months, I’ve had the opportunity to see both sides of this portfolio enigma—first in assembling my own portfolio and applying for positions, and more recently reviewing others’ portfolios with DtM CEO Tim Prestero to find a good fit for the company. This puts me in a unique position: I can still clearly remember the dozens of questions I had at the outset of my job search, but now I’m equipped with the context to give answers! 

The best advice I can give is this: Design your portfolio as well as the projects it contains. Who is your audience, what are they looking for, and what’s the most effective way to deliver it to them?

Who is your audience?

Before you even open InDesign, do some research. What is the standard for portfolios in your design niche? Furniture designers have vastly different portfolios from medical designers. Use this standard as a starting block. If you have a specific company in mind, you can look up the current employees. How do the staff members talk about their work? What skills do they most emphasize? This is a great place to start, but don’t stop there! Design portfolios needs a unique, well-considered approach to properly communicate.

As a student, it’s important to realize that teachers are a very different audience from employers. More often than not, I see people simply transfer class deliverables into a PDF, and presume the portfolio done. In a pinch, this may get the job done, but it can lead to a portfolio that doesn’t communicate anything more than technical skills. We’ve all seen the beautiful page of drawings photoshopped onto a moleskine notebook entitled “SKETCHES.” Employer Malory wants to know WHY you did those sketches. Were you thinking through closure details, or looking for a form that is consistent with a brand language? Most importantly, do your best to communicate your intentions succinctly — preferably in the page title.

What are they looking for?

Or in other words, what purpose does my portfolio serve? Student Malory would have told you that a portfolio is to show people your work, explain how you tackle problems and show the happy clients you’ve worked with. Now, employer Malory says that a portfolio’s main purpose is to substantiate the skills you claim to have. The shift in this thinking came from reviewing resumes. “Proficient with solidworks” can mean vastly different things from different applicants. Show me the results of paying attention in your CAD classes and it will set you apart from the other candidate who says the same thing but slid by. This goes beyond just technical skills, use pictures and stories to show me how you think!

As a student, one of the most common questions is how to present group work. There’s a duality of advice given about this subject. One school of thought says, “You will rarely work by yourself in the professional world, so show us that you can excel on a team of designers.” The other says, “Group work in a portfolio is never safe. How am I to gauge your skills when I don’t know how involved you were in this project?” There is still no clear answer, and every employer will tell you something different. The most I can offer is this: Be transparent about your contribution to the project. If someone else created the 3d model and render that shows your design concept, be sure to clearly call that out on the picture.

What’s the most effective way to deliver your portfolio?

As students, we’re tempted to ask for a blueprint. How many pages should my portfolio be? How many projects? What’s the best format, PDF or website? The answers are never consistent, but that’s because they are beside the point. Instead of asking, “How many pages?” think “How long will it take to review?” The problem with page count is that someone hears “three pages per project,” and then they populate those three pages with so much content that it becomes too busy to communicate anything. Take time to simplify the points of your project, dedicating a page to each point and designing the page to communicate that point as clearly and visually as possible.

Website and PDF portfolios have their applications. Ideally you should be ready to go with both. I remember thinking as a student that website portfolios were so cool and professional. Employer Malory still thinks that’s true, but the challenge is that websites are impersonal. For a job application, personalized touches set you apart faster than anything else. Pick the most relevant projects for the company you’re applying to and use those to populate your portfolio application. That being said, there are ways to be personable with a website: instead of sending an employer to your site’s homepage, consider linking them to a specific project within your website and explain why that project is relevant.

Evaluate your portfolio after it’s done.

Like any design, your portfolio needs to be tested. Sleep on it, then skim it. What does your portfolio communicate when you only read the titles and look at the pictures? Is that on message? Present your portfolio to someone, and take note of their questions. Look for points that require the most verbal explanation. This indicates a problem with either the story, or the communication of the page.

Your portfolio can be a powerful advocate for your work if you want it to be. Take as much effort to design your portfolio as you have the projects inside of it. It will show!

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This “Design Experience that Matters” series is provided courtesy of Timothy Prestero and the team at Design that Matters (DtM). As a nonprofit, DtM collaborates with leading social entrepreneurs and hundreds of volunteers to design new medical technologies for the poor in developing countries. DtM’s Firefly infant phototherapy device is treating thousands of newborns in 21 counties from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In 2012, DtM was named the winner of the National Design Award.


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Design Experience that Matters: Lessons Learned in Rapid Prototyping

The process of prototype fabrication is really a series of problem-solving exercises. Slot A suddenly refuses to accept Tab B, the beautiful CAD model reveals monstrous qualities when it emerges from the 3D printer, the Arduino code refuses to compile. We always find ourselves doing lots of just-in-time self-education, reading product manuals and watching YouTube HOWTO videos.

In brief, here are some of the most valuable lessons learned from our summer design sprint:

Vacuum Forming Polycarbonate

So many bubbles!  This bassinet is meant to be transparent.

Vacuum-forming clear quarter-inch thick polycarbonate sheets isn’t for amateurs! We milled molds out of stacked sheets of MDF (medium-density fiberboard), both to accommodate the limited z-height of the ShopBot CNC and to machine vacuum-channels in the middle layers. Before vacuum-forming, we had to bake the heavy polycarbonate sheets and the mold in a brick oven, or else it would develop thousands of little bubbles that made the material cloudy (see above). Unfortunately, the MDF molds took a beating from the hot polycarbonate, and after a few pulls, the polycarbonate started tearing chunks out of the mold. No mold lasts forever–even the hardened steel tools that LEGO uses for injection molding eventually wear out. Next time, we might skip MDF and instead cut a tool from the more expensive but more robust renshape.

Cleaning 3D Printed Parts

Parts from the 3D printer often come out of the machine with scratchy surfaces or other imperfections, for example marks left by the “raft” or other support material. We’ve learned that if you plan to sand the part to make it smooth and more aesthetically appealing, you are essentially committing to covering the sanded part with bondo and finishing paint. Sanded parts, especially those made from light-colored PLA, just seem to magnetically attract grubbiness. It might be skin oil from handling, smudgy whatever from dirty surfaces, but the part soon looks dingy. If you don’t have the time to sand, bondo, prime and paint, we recommend you remove the unwanted material with a chisel, blade or other scraper rather than sandpaper.

Working With Nichrome Wire

Enter the bare metal butt crimp

The Otter prototype was an opportunity to learn a lot about nichrome heating wire. Here’s the challenge: you want to establish an electrical connection with a wire that immediately heats up when you introduce a current. Soldering this kind of wire won’t work (solder melts when it gets hot). Automotive crimp connectors, which have plastic housings, don’t work (think: melting plastic). In the end, we learned that the best connectors involve mechanical clamping, for example a bare metal butt crimp (which sounds like an awesome band name), or a screw terminal.

Powering Arduino With A Buck Converter

We’ve powered countless little Arduino projects either (1) directly from the computer through a USB cable, (2) with a rechargeable lithium cellphone powerpack and a USB-B connector (Arduino Uno) or micro-USB connector (Arduino Micro), or (3) a 5V alkaline battery pack wired to the Vin pin.

For the Otter prototype, we needed the Arduino to control a relay that was sending 24V to the heater wires. It was easy to generate 24V using an off-the-shelf AC adapter power supply, but how could we also get 5V to power the Arduino without using a second power supply? Enter the humble and amazing buck converter–an inexpensive component that can efficiently generate an output of 3-12V given a 24V input. Presumably this is old hat to any electrical engineer. There exist countless varieties of “DC/DC step-down” or buck converters (ie Adafruit), so you ought to be able to find one that’s a perfect match for your project.

Cloud-Based CAD File Sharing

Autodesk’s cloud-based CAD server, called A360 (aka the web interface for Fusion360), is an amazing collaboration tool. We were able to generate CAD models on the big ThinkStation P910 desktop machines in the DtM studio, and then instantly open the same files on our ThinkPad P50 laptops when we were working at the CNC machine. Hooray for a cloud-storage system that actually works as advertised!

DON’T SHAVE THAT YAK!

Any kind of production rush can easily devolve into fun adventures in “yak shaving“: you were supposed to be testing the prototype thermal control system, and two hours later you find yourself wandering the aisles at Home Depot in search of T-handled allen wrenches.

HOWTO replace a lightbulb

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This “Design Experience that Matters” series is provided courtesy of Timothy Prestero and the team at Design that Matters (DtM). As a nonprofit, DtM collaborates with leading social entrepreneurs and hundreds of volunteers to design new medical technologies for the poor in developing countries. DtM’s Firefly infant phototherapy device is treating thousands of newborns in 21 counties from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In 2012, DtM was named the winner of the National Design Award.


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Design Experience that Matters: Handy Tools for Working With 3D Printers

Here at Design that Matters we do a lot of 3D printing, so we’ve built up this collection of handy but inexpensive tools for supporting our 3D printers. They live in IKEA silverware caddies mounted next to the machines and they just make the work go easier.

1. Super Lube synthetic grease for the build plate lead screw (the lube supplied with most machines gets used up quickly). A single tube of lube lasts for ages. 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Cheap cutting pliers for trimming PLA spools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Metal feeler gauge for consistent results when manually leveling the printer build plate (Makerbot Rep2 works best when the 0.2mm gauge just fits between nozzle and build plate).

 

 

 

  

4. UHU glue stick for securing prints to build plate (useful even with heated build plates). This works better and is more convenient than covering the build plate with blue painter’s tape.  

 

 

 

 

5. Window scraper for removing glue residue and stubborn PLA deposits from build plate. 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Cricut craft spatula for un-sticking prints. We’ll create a little gap under the print with the window scraper, and then lever the rest of the print off the build plate with the craft spatula.  Bonus: we’re less likely to stab ourselves. 

 

 

 

 

7. iFixit metal spudgers for scraping off and digging out printed support material and other defects.

 

 

 

 

  

8. Cheap dental picks for removing support material from internal cavities.

 

 

 

 

 

9. Steel tweezers for getting gunk off the extruder nozzle without melting fingers.

 

 

 

  

 

10. We also have a couple self-healing cutting mats taped to the table next to the machine so we can fuss around with scrapers without scarring the tabletops or damaging the build plates. 

 

 

 

 

A Few More Items:

We’ve mounted an appropriate set of Allen wrenches on a 3D-printed bracket attached to every machine. 

To reduce filament-jams in our oldest machine, the trusty Replicator 2, we printed and mounted this filament guide from Thingiverse on the back of the machine:

Image by FERDYP

For storing PLA, we were delighted to discover that even the big Makerbot-brand spools fit perfectly inside a standard 5-gallon bucket. To prevent humidity from spoiling the PLA, we snap a Gamma Seal Lid on top of the bucket and throw in a handful of silica gel desiccant packs before we screw it shut.

Stay Tuned!

After a productive four years with our Makerbot Replicator 2 (and a frustrating two years with our Makerbot Replicator Gen5), we just upgraded to a Lulzbot Taz 6.  We’ve started experimenting with new filament materials and a heated printer bed.  

We find that glue sticks are still useful for first-layer adhesion, although for exotic materials like nylon some consider generic PVP-based glue sticks more effective than UHU sticks. We still prefer the combination of the window scraper and the spatula for unsticking prints. The new filament spools also fit in our airtight 5-gallon buckets for storage. The biggest change is that we no longer need the feeler gauge, given that the Lulzbot has a self-leveling bed.

Do You Have Any Tips for Us?

We’re still learning how to get the best results from our 3D printers for the least amount of effort. Some machines create rafts (print bases) that are tedious to remove. Although we’ve had success sanding parts with paper or a Dremel, the resulting smooth parts very quickly look grubby (something about dust and oil getting into the seams). For high-quality aesthetic models, we haven’t found an alternative to the laborious process of: bondo, sand, primer, paint, clear-coat. Have any of you come up with a better solution?

_____________________________________

This “Design Experience that Matters” series is provided courtesy of Timothy Prestero and the team at Design that Matters (DtM). As a nonprofit, DtM collaborates with leading social entrepreneurs and hundreds of volunteers to design new medical technologies for the poor in developing countries. DtM’s Firefly infant phototherapy device is treating thousands of newborns in 21 counties from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In 2012, DtM was named the winner of the National Design Award.


Core77

Design Experience that Matters: Handy Tools for Working With 3D Printers

Here at Design that Matters we do a lot of 3D printing, so we’ve built up this collection of handy but inexpensive tools for supporting our 3D printers. They live in IKEA silverware caddies mounted next to the machines and they just make the work go easier.

1. Super Lube synthetic grease for the build plate lead screw (the lube supplied with most machines gets used up quickly). A single tube of lube lasts for ages. 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Cheap cutting pliers for trimming PLA spools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Metal feeler gauge for consistent results when manually leveling the printer build plate (Makerbot Rep2 works best when the 0.2mm gauge just fits between nozzle and build plate).

 

 

 

  

4. UHU glue stick for securing prints to build plate (useful even with heated build plates). This works better and is more convenient than covering the build plate with blue painter’s tape.  

 

 

 

 

5. Window scraper for removing glue residue and stubborn PLA deposits from build plate. 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Cricut craft spatula for un-sticking prints. We’ll create a little gap under the print with the window scraper, and then lever the rest of the print off the build plate with the craft spatula.  Bonus: we’re less likely to stab ourselves. 

 

 

 

 

7. iFixit metal spudgers for scraping off and digging out printed support material and other defects.

 

 

 

 

  

8. Cheap dental picks for removing support material from internal cavities.

 

 

 

 

 

9. Steel tweezers for getting gunk off the extruder nozzle without melting fingers.

 

 

 

  

 

10. We also have a couple self-healing cutting mats taped to the table next to the machine so we can fuss around with scrapers without scarring the tabletops or damaging the build plates. 

 

 

 

 

A Few More Items:

We’ve mounted an appropriate set of Allen wrenches on a 3D-printed bracket attached to every machine. 

To reduce filament-jams in our oldest machine, the trusty Replicator 2, we printed and mounted this filament guide from Thingiverse on the back of the machine:

Image by FERDYP

For storing PLA, we were delighted to discover that even the big Makerbot-brand spools fit perfectly inside a standard 5-gallon bucket. To prevent humidity from spoiling the PLA, we snap a Gamma Seal Lid on top of the bucket and throw in a handful of silica gel desiccant packs before we screw it shut.

Stay Tuned!

After a productive four years with our Makerbot Replicator 2 (and a frustrating two years with our Makerbot Replicator Gen5), we just upgraded to a Lulzbot Taz 6.  We’ve started experimenting with new filament materials and a heated printer bed.  

We find that glue sticks are still useful for first-layer adhesion, although for exotic materials like nylon some consider generic PVP-based glue sticks more effective than UHU sticks. We still prefer the combination of the window scraper and the spatula for unsticking prints. The new filament spools also fit in our airtight 5-gallon buckets for storage. The biggest change is that we no longer need the feeler gauge, given that the Lulzbot has a self-leveling bed.

Do You Have Any Tips for Us?

We’re still learning how to get the best results from our 3D printers for the least amount of effort. Some machines create rafts (print bases) that are tedious to remove. Although we’ve had success sanding parts with paper or a Dremel, the resulting smooth parts very quickly look grubby (something about dust and oil getting into the seams). For high-quality aesthetic models, we haven’t found an alternative to the laborious process of: bondo, sand, primer, paint, clear-coat. Have any of you come up with a better solution?

_____________________________________

This “Design Experience that Matters” series is provided courtesy of Timothy Prestero and the team at Design that Matters (DtM). As a nonprofit, DtM collaborates with leading social entrepreneurs and hundreds of volunteers to design new medical technologies for the poor in developing countries. DtM’s Firefly infant phototherapy device is treating thousands of newborns in 21 counties from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In 2012, DtM was named the winner of the National Design Award.


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Why Design Matters in the Context of Government and Law

A design conference seems like an unusual place to deeply examine politics, but no event held on a college campus would be complete without deep examination of American politics this year. Public policy was a hot topic at 2016’s Better World by Design, during which several presenters examined designers’ roles in politics and policy making. 

In her presentation “Why Designers Need to Run for Congress,” RISD graduate (ID ’14) Leah Chung of US AID spoke to attendees about how to be design evangelists and her path to international relations in US government. While Chung was thankful for the skills and opportunities RISD’s studio courses presented, she was drawn to international relations courses at Brown University and spent an entire semester at Georgetown University in order to gain deeper understanding of the complex global issues to which she wanted to apply her design skills.

“My hope and dream is to see designers in positions of power so that the laws and policies that govern society are people centered and actually make sense in real life. Imagine for example if a congressman or woman did some expansive user research to gather relevant user information from the end users before drafting their laws.”

Eventually, Chung found her career with US AID. Through the organization, she was able to apply open critique culture to meetings and translate idealistic jargon into something concrete and grounded in reality. In asking, “How are we going to solve age-old issues with the same types of thinkers, trained in the same kinds of institutions present year after year?” Chung makes a compelling case for designers invading traditional, broken political structures: designers are trained to listen, respond critically, reframe problems and communicate complex ideas in simple ways.

“If it’s the job of politicians and public servants to empathize with the stories of ordinary citizens, to understand their needs and respond to them with tangible solutions, I really can’t think of a better group than designers for the job.”

Getting directly involved in the dredges of federal government isn’t for everyone. Co-director of Center for Civic Design Dana Chisnell uses design skills to address issues in the voting system on local levels. Chisnell reframes data to make information and interfaces more accessible. In her presentation “Anywhere Ballot, The Future of Universal Access in Voting,” Chisnell presented a variety of ways to use products as a vehicle for voter engagement. The Center’s Field Guides for Ensuring Voter Intent, funded through Kickstarter, take the form of eleven pocket-sized booklets. Inspired by the U.S. Election Assistance Commission’s report “Effective Designs for the Administration of Federal Elections,” which featured AIGA Design For Democracy’s work, Center for Civic Design recognized that the mass of information needed to be simplified and communicated in a way that local election officials could easily understand and enact within particular political constraints.

The Center for Civic Design’s Field Guides for Ensuring Voter Intent establish election material standards

From Designing Usable Ballots to Guiding Voters through the Polling Place, each booklet addresses a particular breakdown in the US voting system on a local level, that effects change on a national level—from micro to macro. In addition to the Center for Civic Design’s field guides, the team designed Anywhere Ballot, a project that addresses the question: how might we make elections accessible to all voters? The prototype applies principles from the organization’s field guides to a digital interface accessible from each users’ own individual device. 

The Anywhere Ballot’s customizable and clear format makes voting simple. 

While it may seem futuristic, the design eliminates the need for separate voting systems, especially for those who do or do not have disabilities, allowing voters to utilize the customized technology that already know and own. While this system will not be available for the current 2016 presidential race, the Center for Civic Design believes it is likely that election jurisdictions will embrace this incorporation of consumer, off-the-shelf technology into the voter-facing part of the election system within the next ten years.


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Material Matters at Holz-Handwerk: Different Takes on Wood

The bulk of the Holz-Handwerk show is tools, machinery and processes. But there were also vendors displaying a variety of takes on wood and wood processing, from CNC timber framing to funky finishes to fun with veneers.

More from Core77’s coverage of this year’s Holz-Handwerk Show!

While Holz-Handwerk features all manner of tools, there’s always a centerpiece reminding you of the material that all of those tools are for: Wood.
Photo credit: Rain Noe
Here SCM Group has rolled out what looks to be a 1957 Fiat 500 covered in industrial cut-offs.
Photo credit: Rain Noe
Here SCM Group has rolled out what looks to be a 1957 Fiat 500 covered in industrial cut-offs.
Photo credit: Rain Noe
Here SCM Group has rolled out what looks to be a 1957 Fiat 500 covered in industrial cut-offs.
Photo credit: Rain Noe
There were a lot of guys turning enormous pieces of wood.
Photo credit: Rain Noe
There were a lot of guys turning enormous pieces of wood.
Photo credit: Rain Noe
And a lot of large, wooden balls.
Photo credit: Rain Noe
And a lot of large, wooden balls.
Photo credit: Rain Noe
And a lot of large, wooden balls.
Photo credit: Rain Noe
And a lot of large, wooden balls.
Photo credit: Rain Noe

View the full gallery here
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