Tag Archives: March

Powerful Portraits Show The Faces Behind The Women’s March On Washington

With the Women’s March on Washington rapidly approaching, photographer Clayton Cubitt set about immortalizing some of the organizers and activists involved with the event. On January 21, 2017, women and advocates for women’s rights will march in Washington—as well as in other cities and countries during sister even. Cubitt’s set of powerful portraits gives a voice to the women behind the march, their faces glowing and vital as they explain why they’ve decided to participate.

More info: Women on the March, Clayton Cubitt, Instagram (h/t: mymodernmet)

“As a woman I feel I need to be vocal about oppression. As a veteran I’m obligated to stand up for my rights and for the rights of others.” – Jessica:

“Without reproductive freedom this country isn’t free. We aren’t free.” – Heidi:

“I want to be on the frontlines of the resistance. The Women’s March is not only a show of our power but a reminder of our collective responsibility to love, protect and protest.” – Faiza:

“I’m marching because so much will be at stake for women of color under a Trump presidency, and we need to be the leaders that steer our country toward progressive change.” – Erin Malone:

“There is so much at stake in this upcoming administration. Women are the majority in this country. Our voices should hold weight.” – Candice:

“I’m twelve years old, looking too grown, my body the first woman to betray me.

Above me, weight. Below me, a thick and fraying gymnastics mat in the corner of our school’s gym.

Three boys. One drools with laughter. Another keeps his distance, or maybe is keeping watch, or worse yet, both. The third, who would later wind up dead but we’re not that far into the story, states his defense, unprompted:

get used to it, you’re a girl

and later I walk home alone, counting my steps, each one bringing me further from that moment and closer to my bedroom- my paints and pastels, my keyboard, cat, my diary, mirrors and mother, the smell of garlic dancing up the stairs and the scratchy feel of the rug on my cheek that I would lay on while counting my freckles and the hours left until the school bells rang again.

There are many things I’ve gotten used to and lying still beneath the fragile weight of a man is not one of them. And so I march, like I always have. I’ll march with my sisters and count my steps. I’ll link arms and kick up dirt, I’ll yell for all the times I couldn’t, I’ll shout for women who can’t. I march because each step forward floats my body home. – Hannah:

“As an Air Force vet & proud daughter of a Honduran immigrant, like endless women before me, my life is anchored in service and fearlessness. Inequality maims us all, and this march is a show of strengths and our collective leadership.” – Pam Campos:

“I march because our democracy is a dumpster fire. I march because structural patriarchy must be dismantled. I march because we fight sexism with solidarity.” – Winnie Wong, coiner of the phrase “Feel the Bern,” on why she’s marching in #womensmarch:

“I have no choice but to organize to protect my family and the communities that I love. We must stand up and fight back, people’s lives depend on it.” – Linda Sarsour:


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Powerful Portraits Show The Faces Behind The Women’s March On Washington

With the Women’s March on Washington rapidly approaching, photographer Clayton Cubitt set about immortalizing some of the organizers and activists involved with the event. On January 21, 2017, women and advocates for women’s rights will march in Washington—as well as in other cities and countries during sister even. Cubitt’s set of powerful portraits gives a voice to the women behind the march, their faces glowing and vital as they explain why they’ve decided to participate.

More info: Women on the March, Clayton Cubitt, Instagram (h/t: mymodernmet)

“As a woman I feel I need to be vocal about oppression. As a veteran I’m obligated to stand up for my rights and for the rights of others.” – Jessica:

“Without reproductive freedom this country isn’t free. We aren’t free.” – Heidi:

“I want to be on the frontlines of the resistance. The Women’s March is not only a show of our power but a reminder of our collective responsibility to love, protect and protest.” – Faiza:

“I’m marching because so much will be at stake for women of color under a Trump presidency, and we need to be the leaders that steer our country toward progressive change.” – Erin Malone:

“There is so much at stake in this upcoming administration. Women are the majority in this country. Our voices should hold weight.” – Candice:

“I’m twelve years old, looking too grown, my body the first woman to betray me.

Above me, weight. Below me, a thick and fraying gymnastics mat in the corner of our school’s gym.

Three boys. One drools with laughter. Another keeps his distance, or maybe is keeping watch, or worse yet, both. The third, who would later wind up dead but we’re not that far into the story, states his defense, unprompted:

get used to it, you’re a girl

and later I walk home alone, counting my steps, each one bringing me further from that moment and closer to my bedroom- my paints and pastels, my keyboard, cat, my diary, mirrors and mother, the smell of garlic dancing up the stairs and the scratchy feel of the rug on my cheek that I would lay on while counting my freckles and the hours left until the school bells rang again.

There are many things I’ve gotten used to and lying still beneath the fragile weight of a man is not one of them. And so I march, like I always have. I’ll march with my sisters and count my steps. I’ll link arms and kick up dirt, I’ll yell for all the times I couldn’t, I’ll shout for women who can’t. I march because each step forward floats my body home. – Hannah:

“As an Air Force vet & proud daughter of a Honduran immigrant, like endless women before me, my life is anchored in service and fearlessness. Inequality maims us all, and this march is a show of strengths and our collective leadership.” – Pam Campos:

“I march because our democracy is a dumpster fire. I march because structural patriarchy must be dismantled. I march because we fight sexism with solidarity.” – Winnie Wong, coiner of the phrase “Feel the Bern,” on why she’s marching in #womensmarch:

“I have no choice but to organize to protect my family and the communities that I love. We must stand up and fight back, people’s lives depend on it.” – Linda Sarsour:


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Regular Pricing for the 2016 Core77 Design Awards Ends Tomorrow, March 8! Here Are 8 Reasons to Enter

Remember what we said about time moving faster than you’d think? Well, believe it or not, the end of Regular pricing for the 2016 Core77 Design Awards is nearly upon us. At 9pm Eastern tomorrow, March 8th, we officially move into our third pricing period. Save yourself the agony of another two weeks of procrastination (and some cash), and submit your design before Regular pricing is over.

We propose entering before Regular pricing ends…….2015 Professional Packaging Winner – Clifton Engagement Ring Case by Andrew Zo

Still on the fence about submitting? Let us help get you down from there. Here are 8 reasons you should enter the 2016 Core77 Design Awards:

1.) We’re the most inclusive Awards program out there. We offer designers in fields as seemingly disparate as Packaging and Service Design the chance to compete on equal footing. We know design isn’t a one trick pony. We believe that pony has, at the very least, 14 tricks.

2.) It’s all done online, so the submission process is a breeze. Think of all you could do with the money you’ll save on postage. We have some ideas.

3.) Students have a chance to participate against fellow students at a sharply discounted rate. We like a fair playing field…and a cheap playing field.

4.) Your work will be seen by these teams of international design leaders. Sure, we could tell you your designs are awesome, but wouldn’t you rather hear it from them?

5.) Receive an honor and have your work enshrined on the Core77 Design Awards site until the end of time. Or at least until Skynet takes over.

6.) As an honoree, your work will be the talk of the town. And the Twittersphere.

7.) Honorees are automatically in the running for our Community Choice prize. Democracy is a beautiful thing.

8.) Win your category and take home the peerless Core77 Trophy. What you do with your trophy is up to you, but the possibilities are endless.

We could go on and on about why you should enter, but we don’t want to keep you for too long. After all, you have an entry to submit, and Regular pricing ends March 8th at 9pm Eastern.

Time is running out. Get your entry in now!


Core77