Tag Archives: makes

This Spring-Loaded Corner Chisel Makes Short Work of Hinge Mortises

If this innovative little tool didn’t already exist, I could see it doing gangbusters on Kickstarter.

When routing out the mortise for a hinge, you of course have the issue that the router bit is cylindrical and thus the corners of the mortise have radiuses. No problem if you’re using leaf hinges with rounded corners, but if you’re using sharp-cornered hinges, you’ve got to chisel out the corners of the mortise. Thus Rockler sells this Spring-Loaded Corner Chisel, which registers against the sidewalls and makes the 90-degree downward cut with one tap from the hammer:

Here’s how it looks in action (this isn’t the Rockler-branded one, but this Dutch version by 24-7 Wood Easy Solutions appears identical):

Sure you’ve still got to pare out the waste, and the purist craftsman would probably scoff; but for the tradesperson who needs to bang out a lot of hinge mortises in a hurry, the $ 27/€20 tool looks like it would pay for itself in no time.


Core77

This Spring-Loaded Corner Chisel Makes Short Work of Hinge Mortises

If this innovative little tool didn’t already exist, I could see it doing gangbusters on Kickstarter.

When routing out the mortise for a hinge, you of course have the issue that the router bit is cylindrical and thus the corners of the mortise have radiuses. No problem if you’re using leaf hinges with rounded corners, but if you’re using sharp-cornered hinges, you’ve got to chisel out the corners of the mortise. Thus Rockler sells this Spring-Loaded Corner Chisel, which registers against the sidewalls and makes the 90-degree downward cut with one tap from the hammer:

Here’s how it looks in action (this isn’t the Rockler-branded one, but this Dutch version by 24-7 Wood Easy Solutions appears identical):

Sure you’ve still got to pare out the waste, and the purist craftsman would probably scoff; but for the tradesperson who needs to bang out a lot of hinge mortises in a hurry, the $ 27/€20 tool looks like it would pay for itself in no time.


Core77

Artist Makes Evergreen Plants That Glow In The Dark

According to artist Marina DeFrates: “I made these evergreen glowing plants. The Botany world has always amazed me as an Industrial designer, each plant has its own unique aesthetics, these aesthetics serve a specific need or function. In making the Lamp Plant I decided to focus on the various types of leafs and their ‘veins’, the veins are cells that bring water and minerals from the roots into the leaf. Powered by LED The Acrylic leafs conduct the light through the engraved veins all the way from the base to the top of the plant, making a soft green light. Each Lamp plant is unique, every leaf is bent individually to create an organic form that is one of a kind, just like nature does.”

More info: Etsy (h/t: boredpanda)









Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

An Artist Transforms The Shapes Of Animals Into Cubes To Makes Them Definitely Look Straight Out Of Minecraft

According to artist Aditya Aryanto: “Hi! I’m Aditya from Indonesia. I tried visualising some animals in different form, which called Anicube or Animal Cube. I am interested in the cubical shape and trying to change some animal form into cubes. First, I was afraid if it would be nicer than the original shape. I was really curious about the results, so I tried to find some funny animal pictures to be changed into Anicube.”

More info: Instagram (h/t: boredpanda)

“I found animal pictures from Unsplash and Pixabay. Once I collected, I started making these images in Photoshop. How to make a cube on animal body, I use the Liquify (Shift+Command+X). After it is formed and I think it is funnier than the original form, I uploaded to Instagram. I saw that many friends liked it, so I was challenged to make it more. So here is the result of my simple works. I hope you like it.”













Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Sloyd Education Theory: Making Things With Your Hands Makes You Smarter

I love learning, and I hate school. Sitting in a classroom while a teacher drones on is my idea of torture. It’s unnatural and it’s boring. But if there’s a physical problem to solve—let’s say I’m making something in the shop, and it keeps breaking, and I have to find things to read/listen to/watch in order to figure out why, and then I make it and it doesn’t break, I love that.

Otto Salomon, a revolutionary Swedish educator in 19th-Century Sweden, also realized that classrooms were boring. He also found that children misbehaved as a result. According to an International Bureau of Education document published by UNESCO,

 Salomon looked upon the contemporary elementary school as being too theoretical—and even that in a most insubstantial way since factual knowledge was learned by heart and repeated. This rote learning of pure facts led to the children adopting negative attitudes towards the school and towards each another: vanity, arrogance and bullying behaviour were commonplace. The children also suffered from being seated for long periods without any physical activity.

A child has a desire for both knowledge and activity. These needs are met when manual work is introduced into the conventional school curriculum.

With this in mind, Salomon formed a training school for teachers in 1875 with a unique mission: The teachers themselves were taught handcrafts—slöjd in Swedish, “sloyd,” Anglicized—so that they could in turn teach these to their pupils. Salomon’s concept was that there was a connection between creating things with your hands and cognitive development, that each would help improve the other.

Salomon was intrigued by the idea of making physical work an element in general education. He considered any person who did not have a sound training in general dexterity as only half-educated. We learn most effectively by activity—by doing things with our hands—and this knowledge should be acquired through self-education. Manual labour at school should provide an all-round education to everybody.

This will be difficult for present-day NYC parents to understand, as schools here have metal detectors; but the first thing children in a slöjd curriculum were given was knives. This was not a big deal in 19th-century Sweden, which was still largely agrarian. “We begin with the knife because we consider it the easiest tool for children to employ, since they have already been in the habit of using it,” Salomon said. Children raised on farms had already handled knives for domestic chores and helping the family put food on the table. And after learning to competently whittle wood with a knife, the children could then graduate to more advanced tools.

There was also a fantastically functional element in this education. The items Salomon’s curriculum called for pupils to make were not birdhouses and toys, but practical items: “Rakes, hammer handles, benches, tables, spoons, etc.—appliances needed in everyday household and farm activities.”

Which is not to say that children were meant to be turned into hardware stores; it was their development that was the goal, with functional objects produced during this development a mere fringe benefit. “The teacher must pay attention to the child’s reactions, behaviour and development. The child must be the focus of attention, and not the tools, the techniques or the products. What is happening to the child during the work process should be the principal interest.”

Also interesting about the slöjd system was that it was intended to cultivate something sorely lacking in, say, American education today: An appreciation for the actual aesthetics of physical objects. “In elementary schools, children should receive the elements of an aesthetic education,” Salomon wrote. “Objects badly made or badly proportioned, and yet nicely ornamented, are really exceedingly ugly. It is far more important that children should be able to judge when models are well-designed than to be able to decorate them.”

His entire ten-point list of aims of a slöjd education is impressive:

1. To instill a taste for and an appreciation of work in general.

2. To create a respect for hard, honest, physical labour.

3. To develop independence and self-reliance.

4. To provide training in the habits of order, accuracy, cleanliness and neatness.

5. To train the eye to see accurately and to appreciate the sense of beauty in form.

6. To develop the sense of touch and to give general dexterity to the hands.

7. To inculcate the habits of attention, industry, perseverance and patience.

8. To promote the development of the body’s physical powers.

9. To acquire dexterity in the use of tools.

10. To execute precise work and to produce useful products.

In the late 1800s slöjd caught on and spread, and Salomon hosted educators from some 40 countries at his school in Sweden. He also traveled the world and lectured. But as manual training spread around the globe, it was inevitable that industrialized countries—the U.S., the U.K., Germany and Japan among them—would of course conflate it with training folks for factory jobs rather than using it for personal cultivation.

Today a variant of slöjd is still taught in Scandinavia, though craft education has long since fallen out of favor in the U.S. Proponents like Mike Rowe still make a case for it to be reinstated, but it is often with the goal of professional advancement.

Miguel Gómez-Ibáñez is the President of the North Bennet Street School, a vocational school in Boston, which adopted the slöjd philosophy way back in 1885. Here he discusses the philosophy:

If you’re interested in learning more about slöjd, the UNESCO document is here [PDF]. Additionally, Google Books is offering Salomon’s “The Teacher’s Hand-book of Slöjd” as a free download.


Core77

Wasteland: The Mad Max Festival That Makes Burning Man Look Lame

1
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

Chaos is the norm at Wasteland, the “world’s largest post-apocalyptic festival” that turns the Mojave Desert into a glorious vision of hell on earth. For four days each September, thousands of survivors maraud a patch of dirt and sand east of Bakersfield, California, in wild jalopies and wage epic bungee-battles in a two-story Thunderdome.

More info: Tod Seelie, Instagram, Facebook (h/t: wired)

2
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

Wasteland combines the coolest parts of Mad Max and Fallout with a dash of Dune in a simple premise: The end of civilization has left a scrappy band of survivors to pillage a scorched, dead planet. Some 2,500 people—the largest crowd in the event’s seven-year history—braved this brutal world last weekend, settling into themed tribes like Skulduggers and Vermin Vagabonds.

3
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

4
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

5
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

6
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

7
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

8
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

9
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

10
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

11
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

12
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

13
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

14
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

15
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

16
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

17
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

18
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

19
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

20
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

21
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

22
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

23
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

24
Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Tesla makes third attempt to open San Antonio showroom

Filed under: ,,

Tesla will spend about $ 250,000 renovating a 12,000-square-foot facility.

Continue reading Tesla makes third attempt to open San Antonio showroom

Tesla makes third attempt to open San Antonio showroom originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 18 Sep 2016 16:30:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink |  Email this |  Comments
Autoblog

Meet The Father Who Makes Amazing Sculptures Out Of Toast For Daughter Who Has Severe Food Allergies

1

But a father-of-two is brightening the breakfasts of his youngest daughter, who suffers severe food allergies, by creating daily toast sculptures. Adam Perry said his nine-year-old daughter Scarlett could not eat dairy, eggs, nuts or shellfish, but that white bread was a safe option. His bread creations to date include the Statue of Liberty, a T-rex and – inspired by the Olympic Games – a silhouette of Mo Farah doing his trademark Mobot celebration. He uses two slices of bread, occasionally some sunflower oil spread, and to attach pieces together he either balances them, pinches them or uses a syringe of golden syrup.

More info: Instagram (h/t: irishexaminer)

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

This Guy Makes A DIY Axe Handle Out Of Gummy Bears

1

Peter Brown, youtuber and craftsman took 2 pounds of sticky delicious mammals into his hands and turned it into a weapon of tree chopping destruction.

More info: youtube.com (h/t: thechive)

2

“What do you get when you cross a 5 lb bag of gummy bears, 13 oz of resin, and a wicked sharp double axe head? Sounds to me like a really bad idea… I love it. I had many “firsts” in this project, but I can say I’m happy as can be that the gummy bear axe now exists. Also, pretty happy to add this to the completed project column,” says Peter on Youtube.

3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Polish Sculptor Makes Water Complete Her Bronze Fountain Sculptures

1

When you hear the word “sculpture”, you unintentionally imagine something that stands still. Unless it goes with the name of this Polish sculptor Malgorzata Chodakowska, who creates these beautiful fountain sculptures out of bronze where the water plays an essential part in the whole structure.

h/t: boredpanda

2

Erupting from the statues in unlikely places, water creates a motion that gives Chodakowska’s sculptures a human-like presence and somehow feels sort of magical.

3

“It takes me up to 2-6 months to complete a sculpture, depending on its complexity,” Malgorzata, who’s been sculpting for 30 years already, told Bored Panda. “My fountains spread the pure joy of life, combining the element of water with the raw material – bronze.”

4

The creation of this stunning artwork starts by modelling it out of clay. Then to turn it into fountain, the sculptor pours these sculptures into bronze. Endless streams of water perfectly complete each figure with a story, which you’re now invited to check out for yourself.

5
6
7
8


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Blacksmith and Sculptor Lane Walkup Makes Art for the Thrill

A few years back, Lane Walkup moved her life and her studio from North Carolina to Portland, Oregon. Bending steel wire into playful shapes, characters and words, Lane’s work is unlike anything we’ve seen. We’ve been longtime fans, and are excited about featuring Walkup along with other Portand-based makers like Ashley Hardy, Bruce Paulson and Nathan McKee in tonight’s Summer Pop-Up at Hand-Eye Supply. We spoke with Walkup to see what’s she’s working on, talk about southern hospitality and Beyoncé…

Core77: How did all the metal work start for you?

Lane Walkup: My dad was a welder in his early 20s while living in NYC, and has always been into making things like furniture and decorative pieces. One day I was bored of trying to paint and asked him to teach me how to weld, so he showed me how to weld “beads” and I started joining scrap metal together. I started blacksmithing soon after that because I wanted to bend and shape objects and not just join them together. After blacksmithing for awhile I progressed into areas like casting and sculptural components.

What pulled you away from the more traditional, structured metalwork to the playful, loose and instinctual stuff you’re making now? 

Furthering my technical skills allowed me to become more creative in my building approach, which enabled me to form ideas in a way I wasn’t able to in the beginning. Plus, the longer I do metalwork the less I feel I have to prove to people, so now I’m just getting weirder with it.

What inspires a piece? Images, films, experiences or something else? 

I don’t really know. I think it’s just what people take in on a daily subconscious level that evokes some sort of emotional response that inspires the things one makes. I have noticed I’ve copied the style of a lot of stuff I had when I was a kid, mainly in how certain things made me feel when I first discovering what I liked. I had this wacky fruit backpack I looooved when I was in, like, 3rd grade. I can make pieces now that make me feel the same way that backpack did. Usually I’m trying to simulate that feeling of thrill whenever I finish something.

You mentioned fun being essential to your work? Why is that? 

Escapism!

What kind of music do you listen to? While you work? And when you’re not working?

I listen to tons of podcasts. Musically—new wave, soul and hip hop basically 24/7. 

What are your big aspirations for your work? Where would you like this work to lead? 

Ideally I would find an avenue that was less about selling each individual piece on a website, and more about building full conceptual ideas—like ornamental or functional installations for spaces with people. I would also love to make props for photo or movie sets one day! I currently have a part time job that allows me to make stuff I enjoy and not just pump out things to pay rent, but I would love to be self-employed one day in the near future. I can crank work out all day long, but I am trying hard to learn about marketing and business as I go. It’s a scary process trying to break into any creative field since people inhale visual content like sugar these days, but I’m remaining positive!

Who are a few artists you’re inspired by? 

Alexander Calder, Tom Tom Club, Selena, Oprah, Keith Haring, Biz Markie, Beyoncé, Barbarella, chefs on Chef’s Table, Caroline Walkup.

Last one, if you weren’t making things out of metal? What would you be doing instead?

I got a degree in Nutrition and Public Health, but I didn’t enjoy working in the field as I learned more about the foundations on which healthcare is built in America…so, maybe trying to be one of Beyoncé’s backup dancers? 

You can check out more of Lane’s work on her website.
And don’t miss her and other great PDX Makers at our July 7 Pop-Up.
See everything Lane was wearing and using in our metalwork collection.

Interview by Jeff Rutherford, originally for Hand-Eye Supply.


Core77

Mazda G-Vectoring Control makes driving better without you knowing

Filed under: ,

The improved performance is invisible, and that’s the point.

Continue reading Mazda G-Vectoring Control makes driving better without you knowing

Mazda G-Vectoring Control makes driving better without you knowing originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 29 Jun 2016 15:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink |  Email this |  Comments
Autoblog

Honoring Designs that Makes the World a Better World for Tykes and Tots in the 2016 Core77 Design Awards

Designers want to use the tools of design to change the world and, for many designers, their world is their child. Every parent wants their child to be safe, happy and healthy, and this year saw a notable effort from designers to try to ensure just that. Many honored projects were focused on bettering and enriching the lives of young children and infants from both an entertainment and safety perspective. Below is just a sampling of the projects honored through the 2016 Core77 Design Awards geared toward tykes and tots.

Firefly Infant Phototherapy – Design for Social Impact Professional Notable

Firefly phototherapy device is an intuitive, cost-effective tool for reducing unnecessary suffering caused by untreated newborn jaundice in developing countries.
Firefly’s LEDs are rated to last up to 44,000 hours before requiring replacement.

Firefly Infant Phototherapy is an affordable, easy to use phototherapy device used to treat jaundice in infants. Specifically, the device targets impoverished, rural areas where the staff may be inexperienced and have limited access to resources. The device was designed with the following four design prompts in mind: effective, maintainable, user-friendly and comforting. After considerable research and testing, “clinical results show that, compared to overhead LED phototherapy, Firefly significantly reduces phototherapy treatment times, reduces the incidence of nosocomial or hospital-acquired infection and in some cases averts the need for expensive and risky exchange blood transfusions.”

Owlet Smartsock – Design for Social Impact Professional Notable

An indicator light on the base station shows green when vital signs are normal and red when something requires a parent’s attention.
Soft, light, and nontoxic materials keep the baby comfortable while wearing the sock.

The Owlet Smartsock is designed to reduce the number of Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUIDs) by providing parents with real-time monitoring of their infant’s vital signs. As Project Team outlines, “the Owlet Smartsock combines hospital-grade pulse oximetry technology with a bluetooth transmitter that connects to an independent base station.” Should there be an abnormality with the infant’s vital signs, the base station turns red and an alert is sent immediately to the parents’ phone via an app. While highly functional, Owlet Smartsock is, above all, a product for newborns, which is why “pastel colors, a charging station that doubles as a night light, and a friendly animal logo come together for a product and brand that’s both future-facing and baby-friendly.”

Fort Boards – Custom Fort Builder – Open Design Professional Notable

Fort Boards is an open-ended construction set that fosters imagination and creativity while giving kids a sense of independence.
When kids connect two Board parts together, they can rotate them together to form the desired angle and add a Connector part to solidify the two Boards at a precise angle.

As Principle Designer August Graube explains, “Fort Boards is a custom fort building kit that allows kids to play inside of their own creations.” Fort Boards offers children the opportunity to channel their creativity into endless constructive possibilities, and build an environment that is uniquely their own. Design Cards can be added to the exterior of each tab to give the structure a metallic, stone or wooden aesthetic, while hinges can be used to create doors and windows. The design also aims to foster skills that can be otherwise difficult to teach: spatial reasoning, imagination, and structural engineering. Ultimately, August Graube hopes for Fort Boards to become “a timeless toy that grows up with children and opens up endless design possibilities for young builders everywhere.”

4moms™ high chair – Consumer Product Professional Notable

The combination of functionality and aesthetics makes for a high chair unlike any other.
The 4moms high chair uses magnets both in the tray latches and on the tray top to make mealtime easier for parents.

4moms™ high chair addresses a persistent issue in an often neglected area of design with a simple but clever solution. By replacing the traditional latch system with a series of magnets, securing your child into the high chair becomes considerably faster and easier. Additionally, magnets are installed in the tray to help your child’s plates and trays stay upright and off the floor. Though seemingly straightforward, considerable research, ideation and troubleshooting went into the 4moms™ high chair design. “The team became experts on magnets throughout the development process,” details the Project Team, “creating dozens of prototypes to hone in on the perfect size, strength and placement for the magnets in both the tray latches and tray top where the magnets were located in a grid pattern to accommodate where plates and bowls would typically be used.”


Core77

How Adding Paper Towels, T-Shirt Scraps or Screens to Sand Makes It Both Strong and Structural

It’s crucial for designers of physical objects to understand how the world around us is constructed. Whether your materials of choice are wood, metal, plastic or fabric, your comprehension of how that material behaves is the first step in you creating a successful design with it. It can also be helpful to look outside your wheelhouse and see how other materials behave.

I’m guessing few of you work with sand, so you’ll likely find the video below fascinating. Here civil engineer Grady Hillhouse demonstrates how sand, an inexpensive and widely available material, can be made stronger by adding slices of material to counter sand’s natural inclinations. (You’ve got to sit through some science-y explanations in the beginning, so if you’re impatient, skip ahead to 4:09.)


Core77