Tag Archives: look

Photographer Captures Two Squirrels Who Look Like They Are Attacking Each Other Like Ninjas

Amateur snapper Martin Docker from Isle of Dogs, east London, spotted the pair going toe-to-toe in his back garden and grabbed his camera to capture the titanic tussle. The maintenance worker captured the duo appearing to fly through the air to land roundhouse kicks, wrestling-style spear moves and judo-esque throws.

h/t: dailymail

Martin told the Daily Mail: “The ninja comparison came right away as I’m into martial arts and I like watching martial arts so that made the photos quite special. My favourite photo is the one where they are both airborne because it is what it is really – it’s got a nice bit of action and plenty going on.”


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Photographer Captures Two Squirrels Who Look Like They Are Attacking Each Other Like Ninjas

Amateur snapper Martin Docker from Isle of Dogs, east London, spotted the pair going toe-to-toe in his back garden and grabbed his camera to capture the titanic tussle. The maintenance worker captured the duo appearing to fly through the air to land roundhouse kicks, wrestling-style spear moves and judo-esque throws.

h/t: dailymail

Martin told the Daily Mail: “The ninja comparison came right away as I’m into martial arts and I like watching martial arts so that made the photos quite special. My favourite photo is the one where they are both airborne because it is what it is really – it’s got a nice bit of action and plenty going on.”


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

An Artist Transforms The Shapes Of Animals Into Cubes To Makes Them Definitely Look Straight Out Of Minecraft

According to artist Aditya Aryanto: “Hi! I’m Aditya from Indonesia. I tried visualising some animals in different form, which called Anicube or Animal Cube. I am interested in the cubical shape and trying to change some animal form into cubes. First, I was afraid if it would be nicer than the original shape. I was really curious about the results, so I tried to find some funny animal pictures to be changed into Anicube.”

More info: Instagram (h/t: boredpanda)

“I found animal pictures from Unsplash and Pixabay. Once I collected, I started making these images in Photoshop. How to make a cube on animal body, I use the Liquify (Shift+Command+X). After it is formed and I think it is funnier than the original form, I uploaded to Instagram. I saw that many friends liked it, so I was challenged to make it more. So here is the result of my simple works. I hope you like it.”













Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

2018 Lexus LS has a livelier look and new twin-turbo V6

Filed under: ,,,

Not exactly what we hoped for, but still pretty good.

Continue reading 2018 Lexus LS has a livelier look and new twin-turbo V6

2018 Lexus LS has a livelier look and new twin-turbo V6 originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 09 Jan 2017 08:45:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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A Look at Wintercheck Factory’s Furniture Designs

I’ve been looking through the portfolio of Wintercheck Factory and I like what I see. Designers Kristen Wentrcek and Andrew Zebulon Williams work with a multitude of materials and manufacturers, and I dig the exploratory nature of this; rather than doing things in just wood or just metal or just plastic, they’re all over the map (quite literally in terms of suppliers) and this speaks of both healthy curiosity and possessing the bravery to experiment.

Their 102 Closet, perfect for singles living in studio apartments, was the first piece that caught my eye:

The 102 Closet is made with heavy gauge chrome-plated steel and mounted on 5″ swiveling casters. In addition to the traditional hanging garment rack, a deep wire cage drawer and removable solid wood bin are provided as enclosed storage for small or folded items. The solid wood bin is made in house by WINTERCHECK FACTORY®.

The steel structure of this design is made in California. Our fabricator manufactures a variety of industrial tubular steel products and dominates the coin-laundry market. Their products can be easily identified by a yellow tag which states that the product is made in the U.S.A.

I’m not crazy about the exposed planer marks on the wood, but I realize I’m armchair quarterbacking here.

Their 501 Chair, made from cast polyurethane rubber and Corian, looks like it came from a Dutch design museum:

Their 101 Side Table looks sturdy and substantial without being clunky and intrusive:

The 101 Side Table is made from 18 gauge steel and is powder coated. The table features adjustable screw feet and a small cutout for cords. A removable utility box sits below for additional storage.

Our manufacturer fabricates the side table alongside a 92-year-old line of steel factory equipment. Founded by two brothers following their service in the first World War, the company has carried on through four generations, working from the same warehouse space in Chicago. Their original 1920s product line included a bench leg, which kickstarted the business and soon became a staple in US Army warehouses and factories.

Their 104 Desk moves to fiberglass:

The 104 Desk is comprised of an industrial fiberglass top and steel legs that are powder coated, have adjustable feet and are removable. The desktop is equipped with a grommet for cord access and the back rail is slightly curved to provide a resting spot for pens.

Our manufacturer fabricates the 104 Desk using a hand lay-up process. This is the oldest and simplest method for making fiberglass designs with an open mold. This process is used for lower volumes and is more labor intensive but incredibly strong; it’s frequently used to make boat hulls. Layers of fiberglass are piled onto a custom mold and then a resin is poured on top, a process which must be monitored so that entrapped air can be squeezed out as the resin begins to cure and harden.

The MCM-ish 103 Chair brings us to leather:

Made in solid oak, the 103 Chair features Italian leather cushions with welting and button details. WINTERCHECK FACTORY® hand picks each hide and uses a supple, natural-finish leather that has been lightly waxed for durability. The steel legs are powder coated, have adjustable feet and are removable.

The fabricator for this design is located in North Carolina and specializes in military and healthcare furniture using a flat line system. This means that 100% of their materials are used and no waste is produced. Since the plant uses only oak and maple, any leftover wood from one line of furniture can be gathered and reallocated to another project seamlessly.

In short, I like the duo’s willingness to experiment and how they share details of their manufacturers’ stories. And their emphasis on Made in the U.S.A. is encouraging.

Check out more of Wintercheck Factory’s stuff here.


Core77

What Do Luxury Sleeper Cabs for Long-Haul Truck Drivers Look Like?

The life of a long-haul trucker can be tough, even when they’re not behind the wheel. When it’s time to get some shuteye in the truck’s cab, some of them have a scant 36″ behind the seats in which to stuff a twin mattress, and there’s barely enough room to turn around back there, let alone get dressed and undressed. And for the trucker who brings their spouse on the road—yes, husband-and-wife trucker teams exist—it’s simply not enough space for two people to live out of.

For those that can pony up for a larger cab, an Indiana-based company called ARI Legacy Sleepers specializes in tricking them out with custom packages suited to the customer’s tastes. Let’s take a look at some of their work.

First off, if you see a cab that’s this size, you can bet there’s more behind the rear seats than just a twin mattress.

And you’d be right. When you look back between the seats, here’s what you see:

And here’s the view looking fore:

Overhead is a small, subtle lighting trick that provides the illusion of more space: Using a mirror and one-way mirror to provide “infinity lighting,” making the LEDS look like they stretch off forever overhead.

Close the curtains to the “cockpit” and enjoy your flatscreen in peace.

There’s plenty of storage both above and below the kitchen counter, which features an electric stovetop and a sink.

When not in use, both have covers that conceal them, providing uninterrupted counter space. This photo below is not the exact same interior, but you get the idea.

Also note the mirror above the sink, so the driver can shave.

Opposite the counter is a sofa and a little nook to the right of it.

You’ll notice a cable management port at back right; one can place a computer, laptop or gaming system here.

To the right of that is a door, and the toilet paper holder on the inside of it has probably clued you in…

…yep, they’ve got a bathroom in here.

A wall-mounted dispenser obviates the need for shelving.

Moving back inside the cabin, we see the sofa, which of course has storage beneath it.

You might think, “Is that where the driver sleeps?” Not exactly; note the dual tracks in the wall. An elevator bed motors down at the touch of a button.

For cabs where there is no rear door, the sofa and bed arrangement can be placed across the rear wall. And as you can see here, the choice of lighting strongly impacts your perception of the space.

The lighting scheme in this one here reminds me of The Peach Pit from the original Beverly Hills 90210.

And this one below is like The Peach Pit but with hardwood floors.

With spaces this small, the materials choice also makes a profound visual impact. This one here is owned by a married couple who both go on the road together, and I imagine it must recall what their actual home looks like, aesthetically:

Another customer has opted to have his look like more of a bachelor pad:

And for drivers who plan to do some open-air sightseeing during downtime, there’s an option to haul your Harley. Yep, if you’ve got the space you can have a motorcycle “garage” with side-loading ramp installed:

You can check out more of ARI’s custom designs here, and they also have a good amount of photos on their Facebook page.


Core77

Surreal Animal Hybrid Tattoos Look Like Quirky Sketchbook Drawings

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Italian-born, London-based illustrator and tattoo artist Otto D’Ambra is known for his avant-garde style, which primarily depicts hybrid animals combined with illustrations seemingly plucked from Boardwalk Empire. D’Ambra is a multi-faceted artist, who began his career as a set designer and evolved over time into body art and etching. In 2012, he opened The White Elephant Studio in London as a creative base for artists.

More info: Otto D’Ambra, The White Elephant Studio (h/t: mymodernmet)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Surreal Animal Hybrid Tattoos Look Like Quirky Sketchbook Drawings

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Italian-born, London-based illustrator and tattoo artist Otto D’Ambra is known for his avant-garde style, which primarily depicts hybrid animals combined with illustrations seemingly plucked from Boardwalk Empire. D’Ambra is a multi-faceted artist, who began his career as a set designer and evolved over time into body art and etching. In 2012, he opened The White Elephant Studio in London as a creative base for artists.

More info: Otto D’Ambra, The White Elephant Studio (h/t: mymodernmet)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Surreal Animal Hybrid Tattoos Look Like Quirky Sketchbook Drawings

1

Italian-born, London-based illustrator and tattoo artist Otto D’Ambra is known for his avant-garde style, which primarily depicts hybrid animals combined with illustrations seemingly plucked from Boardwalk Empire. D’Ambra is a multi-faceted artist, who began his career as a set designer and evolved over time into body art and etching. In 2012, he opened The White Elephant Studio in London as a creative base for artists.

More info: Otto D’Ambra, The White Elephant Studio (h/t: mymodernmet)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Hipster Nativity: This Year, Give A Hipster Look To Your Christmas Nativity Scene

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What if this year, you give a hipster look to your Christmas Nativity scene? Here is the Hipster Nativity Set, which adds many modern elements to the traditional nativity scene, such as organic food, glasses, mustaches, Starbucks coffee, smartphone, selfie, or the Magi delivering Amazon Prime packages. I just love it. The Hipster Nativity Set is available on the Modern Nativity store for $ 129.

More info: Modern Nativity (h/t: ufunk)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Hipster Nativity: This Year, Give A Hipster Look To Your Christmas Nativity Scene

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What if this year, you give a hipster look to your Christmas Nativity scene? Here is the Hipster Nativity Set, which adds many modern elements to the traditional nativity scene, such as organic food, glasses, mustaches, Starbucks coffee, smartphone, selfie, or the Magi delivering Amazon Prime packages. I just love it. The Hipster Nativity Set is available on the Modern Nativity store for $ 129.

More info: Modern Nativity (h/t: ufunk)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

A Look at 3M’s New Design Center

“I’ve lived in creative spaces my entire life,” says Eric Quint, 3M’s Chief Design Officer. And when it comes to workspaces, he says, “Scientists need laboratories; administrators need offices; designers need creative spaces.” To that end, Quint has endeavored to provide the company’s designers with the very best creative space 3M’s considerable resources could provide.

The recently-completed 3M Design Center in St. Paul, Minnesota is a sprawling, 38,000-square-foot multilevel space meant to bring the company’s creatives from various disciplines—product, graphics, UX, packaging, materials—all under one roof. Rows of desks and workstations occupy some of the main level and much of the upstairs. The things we’re not allowed to see are down in the sublevels, like the rapid prototyping lab and the materials library. But the main part of the Design Center, which we were allowed to tour, left quite the impression.

The space, which Quint himself had a hand in designing, features a multitude of areas that reminded me of a variety of settings: The living room of a SoHo loft, a hip cocktail bar, glamping cabins, an art gallery, the VIP room of a nightclub, a dot-com millionaire’s home theater. The relaxed, warm feel of the main areas is purposeful: “One of our goals was to design a living room atmosphere,” Quint explains. “People feel at home in a living room; they feel safe, relaxed, it’s easy to open up and make space for creativity.”

The home-theater-like amphitheater area is a space Quint calls the Design Hive. “It was designed with an idea of a village, where people gather at noon to take shade under an olive tree. People can sit, relax, have conversations about cars and sports, politics and love lives.”

Another function of the Design Hive is educational. “When I came onboard, I asked the design team, ‘When was the last time you had educational design training?’ Most people responded that the last time was in college. In terms of training, the company had developed a great corporate curriculum, but nothing in the area of creativity.” Quint thus started a program he calls Design Vitamins, where experts across a broad spectrum of creative specialties are invited to come to the Design Hive and deliver presentations to the designers.

“The Design Vitamins speakers cover various ‘hot’ topics—they might be experts in digital, or storytelling, or branding, or design management, et cetera,” Quint explains. “Next week, for instance, we have a speaker—the Director of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy of the city of Minneapolis, whom I’m doing a co-presentation with. We’ll discuss driving design and creativity in a business enterprise.”

Why is this important? “We stay involved in local and social initiatives,” Quint explains, “to make sure we leverage 3M’s network of knowledge in a way that can connect with the local community.” The speakers, in turn, “inspire our people in thinking about social impact.”

Then there is environmental impact. In order to have as little of it as possible, the Design Center is loaded with energy-efficient lighting and climate control systems, and the dominant material is reclaimed wood; it shows up everywhere from the walls to the chairs in Quint’s office to the enclosed cabins, which Quint calls Cocoons.

“The open-space concept of the space creates activity—and potential disturbance, so we wanted to create places where you can have your privacy and quiet. There are nine or ten of these Cocoons throughout the center,” Quint says.

In contrast to reclaimed wood, there is one area of the Center where Quint encountered raw concrete during the construction process, and elected to leave it exposed. In this gallery-like space a wall of posters commemorate inventions native to Minnesota, from Scotch Tape to Twister, Post-Its to Tonka Trucks.

Further down along this concrete wall is a startling graffiti mural. “The concrete was screaming for graffiti art, a kind of rebellious way of expression,” Quint says. “We commissioned two local graffiti artists, had a short briefing session—perhaps 15 minutes—where I gave them a few keywords, but primarily told them ‘Just do something that you’ll be proud of.'” The artists were left to their own devices—and, of course, a box of 3M’s signature blue tape to do the masking with.

Other walls in the Design Center are covered with art of the framed variety. 3M has a deep art collection, much of it stored in a basement that Quint descended into with purpose, ready to curate. “I wanted to unlock these great art treasures” and spread them throughout the center, he says. “Design and creativity go very well with art.”

On one wall is a piece of art incorporating 3M’s adhesive wall hooks, arranged into a map of the world. Which is, essentially, 3M’s realm. The company employs roughly 90,000 people in 70 countries and sells their products, of which there are over 55,000, to people in over 200 countries. (The blue hooks on the map denote the location of 3M facilities.)

Moving beyond the artwork, the Design Center’s entryway, in contrast, turns to science. 3M’s translucent films cover the glass walls, purposefully arranged by the design team in a series of abstract shapes and tones; as you walk past, the colors change as if by magic. Standing at one end of the entryway or the other provides two completely different visual experiences.

Touring the Design Center reveals art and science, the communal and the private, the local and the global. These contrasts are not at odds but are instead meant to work together, bonding to one another as if by one of the company’s adhesives; nothing exists in a vacuum, least of all innovation, which in Quint’s estimation requires multiple bonding processes.

Here’s what that means: In a sense, the Design Center and Quint himself are bonding forces, connectors. “The theme here is collaborative creativity,” Quint says. “I think if you want to drive innovation, it’s not about having the big idea. It is much more about managing and guiding the big idea through the system. You can find tons of great ideas, but not many people that speak the many required languages across the company. For instance, engineers and scientists speak different languages. As do marketing and strategy and design teams. In order to create impact, you must be able to speak the languages across those different disciplines.”

Quint can. Unlike your average industrial designer, Quint also has a background in mechanical engineering with a specialization in industrial engineering. “That background helps a lot in shaping an organization,” Quint says. “Industrial engineering is very much about designing organizations. I’m here to drive the design of the global creative platform of the company. That includes not only providing an education of design to the company and creating awareness, but more or less helping to design the company.”

Even more unusually for a designer, Quint also has a background in strategy and marketing. Prior to joining 3M, Quint spent ten years running a design consultancy and over twenty years at Philips, where he advanced to Vice President of Philips Design. On the way to gaining that position, he wholeheartedly threw himself into the business aspects of design, gaining expertise in “translating the value of design into a business context.”

What 3M has in their Design Center is a multifaceted work, play and learning space run by a polymathic Chief Design Officer. Together their mission is to “help the company to bring all of our great materials, science and technological solutions together in a way that is even more relevant to our customers,” Quint explains. “Design helps us form an emotional connection to our audiences.”

Part of Quint’s job is to take several seemingly disparate things and discover, and then explain to others, how they can in fact be connected in a meaningful way. This comes into sharp focus in his office, which is surprisingly humble and unpretentious. On the wall behind his desk are three pieces of artwork that he discovered during the basement dig: Black-and-white photographs of Miles Davis, Sarah Vaughan and Art Blakey.

“As I am a jazz man, I was immediately attracted to the images,” says Quint, who has been playing music since childhood. But did he just grab these three unconsciously, randomly? Perhaps, perhaps not. As the photos lived on his office wall, Quint began to see a connection between the artists to his work and the work of 3M. “As I began to think about it, I realized that Miles Davis, for me he is the innovator. He started in the ’50s as a young kid blowing bebop on his horn, and then he developed, continued to develop, over time. Just before he passed away, in his last five to ten years, he invented jazz fusion. It was as if he rebranded; he was an innovator all the way.

 

 

 

“Sarah Vaughn,” he continues. “Singing is all about storytelling; touching people in their hearts, and Vaughan sang from her soul. Whatever we do, we have to have connecting stories and relevant stories that connect technology and solutions with the desires, the dreams, the needs of our customers.

 

 

 

 

 

“Then there’s Art Blakey,” he says, indicating the drummer. “Blakey is all about timing and rhythm. And timing is so important in innovation; I’ve seen great technology, great innovations go wrong because it was just not the right time.

 

 

 

 

 

“So, coincidentally or not, that is what I see with these three,” Quint concludes. “The purpose in my life as an innovator and a design leader. ‘Innovation, storytelling and timing.'”


Core77

A Look Inside One Of The World’s Most Isolated Tribes With Incredible Photos You Probably Haven’t Seen Before

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Dani warrior carrying weapons in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. Deep in the highlands of Western New Guinea, Indonesia, lives one of the world’s most isolated tribes. Known as the Dani people, the tribe was unwittingly discovered by American philanthropist, Richard Archbold, after an expedition in 1938.

Since the mid twentieth century the Dani tribe have become well known for their unique customs and strong sense of identity as they cling to their traditional ways. One of their customs is the wearing of an unusual piece of underwear worn by males. Known as a Koteka, it is commonly referred to as a pen*s sheath. Photographer Teh Han Lin from neighbouring Singapore snapped the tribe over a four day period. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Dani tribeswoman smokes a cigarette and shows her amputated fingers in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Dani tribe celebrate annual festival in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Young children from Dani tribe smiling in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Dani tribe elders pose for a picture in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Dani tribe elder in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Dani tribe prepare for annual festival in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Women and child from the Dani tribe in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Women from the Dani tribe look over hills in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Dani women young and old pose for a picture in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Young boy and girl from Dani tribe sit inside a hut in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Dani tribe warrior covered in war paint in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Young Dani warriors holding weapons in Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Dani tribeswomen usen traditional oven to cook food in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Tribeswomen pose for a photo in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Dani tribe elder with younger member of the tribe IN, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Dani warrior holds a sphere in his right hand in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)

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Dani tribe warrior with weapons in, Western New Guinea, Indonesia, August 2016. (Photo by Teh Han Lin/Barcroft Images)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

A Look at 3M’s New Design Center

“I’ve lived in creative spaces my entire life,” says Eric Quint, 3M’s Chief Design Officer. And when it comes to workspaces, he says, “Scientists need laboratories; administrators need offices; designers need creative spaces.” To that end, Quint has endeavored to provide the company’s designers with the very best creative space 3M’s considerable resources could provide.

The recently-completed 3M Design Center in St. Paul, Minnesota is a sprawling, 38,000-square-foot multilevel space meant to bring the company’s creatives from various disciplines—product, graphics, UX, packaging, materials—all under one roof. Rows of desks and workstations occupy some of the main level and much of the upstairs. The things we’re not allowed to see are down in the sublevels, like the rapid prototyping lab and the materials library. But the main part of the Design Center, which we were allowed to tour, left quite the impression.

The space, which Quint himself had a hand in designing, features a multitude of areas that reminded me of a variety of settings: The living room of a SoHo loft, a hip cocktail bar, glamping cabins, an art gallery, the VIP room of a nightclub, a dot-com millionaire’s home theater. The relaxed, warm feel of the main areas is purposeful: “One of our goals was to design a living room atmosphere,” Quint explains. “People feel at home in a living room; they feel safe, relaxed, it’s easy to open up and make space for creativity.”

The home-theater-like amphitheater area is a space Quint calls the Design Hive. “It was designed with an idea of a village, where people gather at noon to take shade under an olive tree. People can sit, relax, have conversations about cars and sports, politics and love lives.”

Another function of the Design Hive is educational. “When I came onboard, I asked the design team, ‘When was the last time you had educational design training?’ Most people responded that the last time was in college. In terms of training, the company had developed a great corporate curriculum, but nothing in the area of creativity.” Quint thus started a program he calls Design Vitamins, where experts across a broad spectrum of creative specialties are invited to come to the Design Hive and deliver presentations to the designers.

“The Design Vitamins speakers cover various ‘hot’ topics—they might be experts in digital, or storytelling, or branding, or design management, et cetera,” Quint explains. “Next week, for instance, we have a speaker—the Director of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy of the city of Minneapolis, whom I’m doing a co-presentation with. We’ll discuss driving design and creativity in a business enterprise.”

Why is this important? “We stay involved in local and social initiatives,” Quint explains, “to make sure we leverage 3M’s network of knowledge in a way that can connect with the local community.” The speakers, in turn, “inspire our people in thinking about social impact.”

Then there is environmental impact. In order to have as little of it as possible, the Design Center is loaded with energy-efficient lighting and climate control systems, and the dominant material is reclaimed wood; it shows up everywhere from the walls to the chairs in Quint’s office to the enclosed cabins, which Quint calls Cocoons.

“The open-space concept of the space creates activity—and potential disturbance, so we wanted to create places where you can have your privacy and quiet. There are nine or ten of these Cocoons throughout the center,” Quint says.

In contrast to reclaimed wood, there is one area of the Center where Quint encountered raw concrete during the construction process, and elected to leave it exposed. In this gallery-like space a wall of posters commemorate inventions native to Minnesota, from Scotch Tape to Twister, Post-Its to Tonka Trucks.

Further down along this concrete wall is a startling graffiti mural. “The concrete was screaming for graffiti art, a kind of rebellious way of expression,” Quint says. “We commissioned two local graffiti artists, had a short briefing session—perhaps 15 minutes—where I gave them a few keywords, but primarily told them ‘Just do something that you’ll be proud of.'” The artists were left to their own devices—and, of course, a box of 3M’s signature blue tape to do the masking with.

Other walls in the Design Center are covered with art of the framed variety. 3M has a deep art collection, much of it stored in a basement that Quint descended into with purpose, ready to curate. “I wanted to unlock these great art treasures” and spread them throughout the center, he says. “Design and creativity go very well with art.”

On one wall is a piece of art incorporating 3M’s adhesive wall hooks, arranged into a map of the world. Which is, essentially, 3M’s realm. The company employs roughly 90,000 people in 70 countries and sells their products, of which there are over 55,000, to people in over 200 countries. (The blue hooks on the map denote the location of 3M facilities.)

Moving beyond the artwork, the Design Center’s entryway, in contrast, turns to science. 3M’s translucent films cover the glass walls, purposefully arranged by the design team in a series of abstract shapes and tones; as you walk past, the colors change as if by magic. Standing at one end of the entryway or the other provides two completely different visual experiences.

Touring the Design Center reveals art and science, the communal and the private, the local and the global. These contrasts are not at odds but are instead meant to work together, bonding to one another as if by one of the company’s adhesives; nothing exists in a vacuum, least of all innovation, which in Quint’s estimation requires multiple bonding processes.

Here’s what that means: In a sense, the Design Center and Quint himself are bonding forces, connectors. “The theme here is collaborative creativity,” Quint says. “I think if you want to drive innovation, it’s not about having the big idea. It is much more about managing and guiding the big idea through the system. You can find tons of great ideas, but not many people that speak the many required languages across the company. For instance, engineers and scientists speak different languages. As do marketing and strategy and design teams. In order to create impact, you must be able to speak the languages across those different disciplines.”

Quint can. Unlike your average industrial designer, Quint also has a background in mechanical engineering with a specialization in industrial engineering. “That background helps a lot in shaping an organization,” Quint says. “Industrial engineering is very much about designing organizations. I’m here to drive the design of the global creative platform of the company. That includes not only providing an education of design to the company and creating awareness, but more or less helping to design the company.”

Even more unusually for a designer, Quint also has a background in strategy and marketing. Prior to joining 3M, Quint spent ten years running a design consultancy and over twenty years at Philips, where he advanced to Vice President of Philips Design. On the way to gaining that position, he wholeheartedly threw himself into the business aspects of design, gaining expertise in “translating the value of design into a business context.”

What 3M has in their Design Center is a multifaceted work, play and learning space run by a polymathic Chief Design Officer. Together their mission is to “help the company to bring all of our great materials, science and technological solutions together in a way that is even more relevant to our customers,” Quint explains. “Design helps us form an emotional connection to our audiences.”

Part of Quint’s job is to take several seemingly disparate things and discover, and then explain to others, how they can in fact be connected in a meaningful way. This comes into sharp focus in his office, which is surprisingly humble and unpretentious. On the wall behind his desk are three pieces of artwork that he discovered during the basement dig: Black-and-white photographs of Miles Davis, Sarah Vaughan and Art Blakey.

“As I am a jazz man, I was immediately attracted to the images,” says Quint, who has been playing music since childhood. But did he just grab these three unconsciously, randomly? Perhaps, perhaps not. As the photos lived on his office wall, Quint began to see a connection between the artists to his work and the work of 3M. “As I began to think about it, I realized that Miles Davis, for me he is the innovator. He started in the ’50s as a young kid blowing bebop on his horn, and then he developed, continued to develop, over time. Just before he passed away, in his last five to ten years, he invented jazz fusion. It was as if he rebranded; he was an innovator all the way.

 

 

 

“Sarah Vaughn,” he continues. “Singing is all about storytelling; touching people in their hearts, and Vaughan sang from her soul. Whatever we do, we have to have connecting stories and relevant stories that connect technology and solutions with the desires, the dreams, the needs of our customers.

 

 

 

 

 

“Then there’s Art Blakey,” he says, indicating the drummer. “Blakey is all about timing and rhythm. And timing is so important in innovation; I’ve seen great technology, great innovations go wrong because it was just not the right time.

 

 

 

 

 

“So, coincidentally or not, that is what I see with these three,” Quint concludes. “The purpose in my life as an innovator and a design leader. ‘Innovation, storytelling and timing.'”


Core77

A Look at 3M’s New Design Center

“I’ve lived in creative spaces my entire life,” says Eric Quint, 3M’s Chief Design Officer. And when it comes to workspaces, he says, “Scientists need laboratories; administrators need offices; designers need creative spaces.” To that end, Quint has endeavored to provide the company’s designers with the very best creative space 3M’s considerable resources could provide.

The recently-completed 3M Design Center in St. Paul, Minnesota is a sprawling, 38,000-square-foot multilevel space meant to bring the company’s creatives from various disciplines—product, graphics, UX, packaging, materials—all under one roof. On the main level and upstairs, are rows of desks and workstations. The things we’re not allowed to see are down in the sublevels, like the rapid prototyping lab and the materials library. But the main part of the Design Center, which we were allowed to tour, left quite the impression.

The space, which Quint himself had a hand in designing, features a multitude of areas that reminded me of a variety of settings: The living room of a SoHo loft, a hip cocktail bar, glamping cabins, an art gallery, the VIP room of a nightclub, a dot-com millionaire’s home theater. The relaxed, warm feel of the main areas is purposeful: “One of our goals was to design a living room atmosphere,” Quint explains. “People feel at home in a living room; they feel safe, relaxed, it’s easy to open up and make space for creativity.”

The home-theater-like amphitheater area is a space Quint calls the Design Hive. “It was designed with an idea of a village, where people gather at noon to take shade under an olive tree. People can sit, relax, have conversations about cars and sports, and politics and love lives.”

Another function of the Design Hive is educational. “When I came onboard, I asked the design team, ‘When was the last time you had educational design training?’ Most people responded that the last time was in college. In terms of training, the company had developed a great corporate curriculum, but nothing in the area of creativity.” Quint thus started a program he calls Design Vitamins, where experts across a broad spectrum of creative specialties are invited to come in and deliver presentations to the designers.

“The Design Vitamins speakers cover various ‘hot’ topics—they might be experts in digital, or storytelling, or branding, or design management, et cetera,” Quint explains. “Next week, for instance, we have a speaker—the Director of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy of the city of Minneapolis, whom I’m doing a co-presentation with. We’ll discuss driving design and creativity in a business enterprise.”

Why is this important? “We stay involved in local and social initiatives,” Quint explains, “to make sure we leverage 3M’s network of knowledge in a way that can connect with the local community.” The speakers, in turn, “inspire our people in thinking about social impact.”

Then there is environmental impact. In order to have as little of it a possible, the Design Center is loaded with energy-efficient lighting and climate control systems, and the dominant material is reclaimed wood; it shows up everywhere from the walls to the chairs in Quint’s office to the enclosed cabins, which Quint calls Cocoons.

“The open-space concept of the space creates activity—and potential disturbance, so we wanted to create places where you can have your privacy and quiet. There are nine or ten of these Cocoons throughout the center,” Quint says.

There is one area of the Center where Quint encountered raw concrete during the construction process, and elected to leave it exposed. In this gallery-like space a wall of posters commemorate inventions native to Minnesota, from Scotch Tape to Twister, Post-Its to Tonka Trucks.

Further down along this concrete wall is a startling graffiti mural. “The concrete was screaming for graffiti art, a kind of rebellious way of expression,” Quint says. “We commissioned two local graffiti artists, had a short briefing session—perhaps 15 minutes—where I gave them a few keywords, but primarily told them ‘Just do something that you’ll be proud of.'” The artists were left to their own devices—and, of course, a box of 3M’s signature blue tape to do the masking with.

Other walls in the Design Center are covered with art of the framed variety. 3M has a deep art collection, much of it stored in a basement that Quint descended into with purpose, ready to curate. “I wanted to unlock these great art treasures” and spread them throughout the center, he says. “Design and creativity go very well with art.”

On one wall is a piece of art incorporating 3M’s adhesive wall hooks, arranged into a map of the world. Which is, essentially, 3M’s realm. The company employs roughly 100,000 people in 70 countries and sells their products, of which there are over 55,000, to people in over 200 countries. (The blue hooks on the map denote the location of 3M facilities.)

Moving beyond the artwork, the Design Center’s entryway, in contrast, turns to science. 3M’s translucent films cover the glass walls, purposefully arranged by the design team in a series of abstract shapes and tones; as you walk past, the colors change as if by magic. Standing at one end of the entryway or the other provides two completely different visual experiences.

Touring the Design Center reveals art and science, the communal and the private, the local and the global. These contrasts are not at odds but are instead meant to work together, bonding to one another as if by one of the company’s adhesives; nothing exists in a vacuum, least of all innovation, which in Quint’s estimation, requires multiple bonding processes.

Here’s what that means: In a sense, the Design Center and Quint himself are bonding forces, connectors. “The theme here is collaborative creativity,” Quint says. “I think if you want to drive innovation, it’s not about having the big idea. It is much more about managing and guiding the big idea through the system. You can find tons of great ideas, but not many people that speak the many required languages across the company. For instance, engineers and scientists speak different languages. As do marketing and strategy and design teams. In order to create impact, you must be able to speak the languages across those different disciplines.”

Quint can. Unlike your average industrial designer, Quint also has a background in mechanical engineering with a specialization in industrial engineering. “That background helps a lot in shaping an organization,” Quint says. “Industrial engineering is very much about designing organizations. I’m here to drive the design of the global creative platform of the company. That includes not only providing an education of design to the company and creating awareness, but more or less helping to design the company.”

Even more unusually for a designer, Quint also has a background in strategy and marketing. Prior to joining 3M, Quint spent ten years running a design consultancy and over twenty years at Philips, where he advanced to Vice President of Philips Design. On the way to gaining that position, he wholeheartedly threw himself into the business aspects of design, gaining expertise in “translating the value of design into a business context.”

What 3M has in their Design Center is a multifaceted work, play and learning space run by a polymathic Chief Design Officer. Together their mission is to “help the company to bring all of our great materials, science and technological solutions together in a way that is even more relevant to our customers,” Quint explains. “Design helps us form an emotional connection to our audiences.”

Part of Quint’s job, in a way, is to take several seemingly disparate things and discover, and then explain to others, how they can in fact be connected in a meaningful way. This comes into sharp focus in his office, which is surprisingly humble and unpretentious. On the wall behind his desk are three pieces of artwork that he discovered during the basement dig: Black-and-white photographs of Miles Davis, Sarah Vaughan and Art Blakey.

“As I am a jazz man, I was immediately attracted to the images,” says Quint, who has been playing music since childhood. But did he just grab these three unconsciously, randomly? Perhaps, perhaps not. As the photos lived on his office wall, Quint began to see a connection between the artists to his work and the work of 3M. “As I began to think about it, I realized that Miles Davis, for me he is the innovator. He started in the ’50s as a young kid blowing bebop on his horn, and then he developed, continued to develop, over time. Just before he passed away, in his last five to ten years, he invented jazz fusion. It was as if he rebranded; he was an innovator all the way.

“Sarah Vaughn,” he continues. “Singing is all about storytelling; touching people in their hearts, and Vaughan sang from her soul. Whatever we do, we have to have connecting stories and relevant stories that connect technology and solutions with the desires, the dreams, the needs of our customers.

“Then there’s Art Blakey,” he says, indicating the drummer. “Blakey is all about timing and rhythm. And timing is so important in innovation; I’ve seen great technology, great innovations go wrong because it was just not the right time.

“So, coincidentally or not, that is what I see with these three,” Quint concludes. “The purpose in my life as an innovator and a design leader. Innovation, storytelling and timing.”


Core77

Look Inside a Private Jet Designed by Marc Newson

En route to cover Autodesk University, I did JFK-to-McCarran in a cramped Airbus A320 where the “entertainment” controls were located on top of a shared armrest. Because the enormous gentleman next to me fell asleep with his arm atop the rest, changing the channel and adjusting the volume required waking him each time. Not the ideal UX.

Naturally, upon landing, I asked myself what the opposite flying experience would be. No, not first class; I mean a private jet kitted out by a top designer. And I found it. Behold: A private Boeing 737 with an interior designed by Marc Newson, for the UK’s Freestream Aircraft.

Even though there’s no one sitting next to you, Newson knows better than to design seat-mounted controls where your arm is going to go. So, he’s got them tucked away in a little alcove in the armrest.

Here’s the on-board conference room, with an image of the world you and your co-masters-of-the-universe are about to dominate displayed on the flatscreen.

I love that all of the seats, including the couch, have seatbelts. This way, you can tell meeting participants to “buckle up,” and mean it literally, before you make a momentous announcement.

Meeting participants who express hesitation at your plans for world domination are banished to this small chamber seen at left.

Inside the chamber they sit at this small nook, where they are instructed to read an entire issue of Vanity Fair and prepare a book report on it. The backless seat is meant to communicate a loss of status.

Yes-men, meanwhile, are treated to tea and sweets in this lounge area. Thoughtfully, all of the treats on the top tier of the tray are gluten-free. Two books are provided for their reading pleasure: The first is your autobiography. The second is a leather-bound collection of book reports on various Vanity Fair issues, to remind you what happens when you step out of line.

Below you can see that the owner has managed to save up for this jet by sticking with an older MacBook Pro that still has the CD slot in the front. Good things come to those who hold off on upgrading.

On to the master bedroom. Speedboat racing is beamed onto the screen, 24-7, via satellite.

At first, the design language might seem a bit strange: This light fixture over the bed recalls a turbine, perhaps providing a sensation that you’ll get sucked up into it while snoozing. Then there are those odd keyhole-shaped fixtures in the leather headboard.

The keyhole shapes turn out to be form-follows-function. They’re reading lamps that tuck away when not in use. I don’t have a wise-ass comment about these, and I think they are pretty cool.

The master bathroom looks pretty awesome. For starters, the shower is bigger than the one in my Manhattan apartment.

So is the sink and vanity area.

You’ll note there is no sign urging you to wipe out the sink basin as a courtesy to the next passenger.

I noticed that the toilet is not shown, and I thought it would be funny if this was actually the toilet. As in, you lift the lid and there’s nothing there, just empty sky whizzing past beneath you while your hair starts to blow around.

Anyways, see you in coach.


Core77

Design Job: Look Into the Future as Topology Eyewear’s Lead Product Designer in San Francisco, CA

Topology Eyewear is an early-stage fashion tech startup in San Francisco, designing and manufacturing custom eyewear. Half of the population needs eyeglasses, but it’s really difficult to find a pair that fits perfectly while still looking exactly the way you want it to. Topology’s solution is to build

View the full design job here
Core77

Wasteland: The Mad Max Festival That Makes Burning Man Look Lame

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Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

Chaos is the norm at Wasteland, the “world’s largest post-apocalyptic festival” that turns the Mojave Desert into a glorious vision of hell on earth. For four days each September, thousands of survivors maraud a patch of dirt and sand east of Bakersfield, California, in wild jalopies and wage epic bungee-battles in a two-story Thunderdome.

More info: Tod Seelie, Instagram, Facebook (h/t: wired)

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Photo by Tod Seelie for Wired

Wasteland combines the coolest parts of Mad Max and Fallout with a dash of Dune in a simple premise: The end of civilization has left a scrappy band of survivors to pillage a scorched, dead planet. Some 2,500 people—the largest crowd in the event’s seven-year history—braved this brutal world last weekend, settling into themed tribes like Skulduggers and Vermin Vagabonds.

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Listen, the Type R and the WRX STI don’t look alike. Here’s why.

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It’s a totally scientific and unbiased analysis of why these cars don’t look alike. Totally.

Continue reading Listen, the Type R and the WRX STI don’t look alike. Here’s why.

Listen, the Type R and the WRX STI don’t look alike. Here’s why. originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 02 Oct 2016 14:30:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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