Tag Archives: Learned’

Toyota’s FT-4X concept learned the wrong lessons from the Honda Element experiment

The FT-4X is a playful generalist. Don’t pigeonhole it.

Continue reading Toyota’s FT-4X concept learned the wrong lessons from the Honda Element experiment

Toyota’s FT-4X concept learned the wrong lessons from the Honda Element experiment originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 13 Apr 2017 18:45:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Design Experience that Matters: Lessons Learned in Rapid Prototyping

The process of prototype fabrication is really a series of problem-solving exercises. Slot A suddenly refuses to accept Tab B, the beautiful CAD model reveals monstrous qualities when it emerges from the 3D printer, the Arduino code refuses to compile. We always find ourselves doing lots of just-in-time self-education, reading product manuals and watching YouTube HOWTO videos.

In brief, here are some of the most valuable lessons learned from our summer design sprint:

Vacuum Forming Polycarbonate

So many bubbles!  This bassinet is meant to be transparent.

Vacuum-forming clear quarter-inch thick polycarbonate sheets isn’t for amateurs! We milled molds out of stacked sheets of MDF (medium-density fiberboard), both to accommodate the limited z-height of the ShopBot CNC and to machine vacuum-channels in the middle layers. Before vacuum-forming, we had to bake the heavy polycarbonate sheets and the mold in a brick oven, or else it would develop thousands of little bubbles that made the material cloudy (see above). Unfortunately, the MDF molds took a beating from the hot polycarbonate, and after a few pulls, the polycarbonate started tearing chunks out of the mold. No mold lasts forever–even the hardened steel tools that LEGO uses for injection molding eventually wear out. Next time, we might skip MDF and instead cut a tool from the more expensive but more robust renshape.

Cleaning 3D Printed Parts

Parts from the 3D printer often come out of the machine with scratchy surfaces or other imperfections, for example marks left by the “raft” or other support material. We’ve learned that if you plan to sand the part to make it smooth and more aesthetically appealing, you are essentially committing to covering the sanded part with bondo and finishing paint. Sanded parts, especially those made from light-colored PLA, just seem to magnetically attract grubbiness. It might be skin oil from handling, smudgy whatever from dirty surfaces, but the part soon looks dingy. If you don’t have the time to sand, bondo, prime and paint, we recommend you remove the unwanted material with a chisel, blade or other scraper rather than sandpaper.

Working With Nichrome Wire

Enter the bare metal butt crimp

The Otter prototype was an opportunity to learn a lot about nichrome heating wire. Here’s the challenge: you want to establish an electrical connection with a wire that immediately heats up when you introduce a current. Soldering this kind of wire won’t work (solder melts when it gets hot). Automotive crimp connectors, which have plastic housings, don’t work (think: melting plastic). In the end, we learned that the best connectors involve mechanical clamping, for example a bare metal butt crimp (which sounds like an awesome band name), or a screw terminal.

Powering Arduino With A Buck Converter

We’ve powered countless little Arduino projects either (1) directly from the computer through a USB cable, (2) with a rechargeable lithium cellphone powerpack and a USB-B connector (Arduino Uno) or micro-USB connector (Arduino Micro), or (3) a 5V alkaline battery pack wired to the Vin pin.

For the Otter prototype, we needed the Arduino to control a relay that was sending 24V to the heater wires. It was easy to generate 24V using an off-the-shelf AC adapter power supply, but how could we also get 5V to power the Arduino without using a second power supply? Enter the humble and amazing buck converter–an inexpensive component that can efficiently generate an output of 3-12V given a 24V input. Presumably this is old hat to any electrical engineer. There exist countless varieties of “DC/DC step-down” or buck converters (ie Adafruit), so you ought to be able to find one that’s a perfect match for your project.

Cloud-Based CAD File Sharing

Autodesk’s cloud-based CAD server, called A360 (aka the web interface for Fusion360), is an amazing collaboration tool. We were able to generate CAD models on the big ThinkStation P910 desktop machines in the DtM studio, and then instantly open the same files on our ThinkPad P50 laptops when we were working at the CNC machine. Hooray for a cloud-storage system that actually works as advertised!

DON’T SHAVE THAT YAK!

Any kind of production rush can easily devolve into fun adventures in “yak shaving“: you were supposed to be testing the prototype thermal control system, and two hours later you find yourself wandering the aisles at Home Depot in search of T-handled allen wrenches.

HOWTO replace a lightbulb

_____________________________________

This “Design Experience that Matters” series is provided courtesy of Timothy Prestero and the team at Design that Matters (DtM). As a nonprofit, DtM collaborates with leading social entrepreneurs and hundreds of volunteers to design new medical technologies for the poor in developing countries. DtM’s Firefly infant phototherapy device is treating thousands of newborns in 21 counties from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In 2012, DtM was named the winner of the National Design Award.


Core77

What I Learned at Chevy’s Snow Driving Training Event

Chevrolet recently invited Core77 up to their Winter Drive program in Lime Rock, Connecticut, whereby they put journalists behind the wheel of a Chevy on a snow course accompanied by expert driving instructors. The idea is to teach you how to better navigate poor driving conditions in everyday, non-specialty vehicles.

To explain: The last snow-driving event I attended featured winterized, turbocharged four-wheel-drive vehicles outfitted with snow tires, and the emphasis was on speed/fun. In contrast, the appeal of this event is that it more closely mimics real-world situations: They put you in a plain-Jane Chevy Cruze with plain-ol’ all-season radials, as if you never got around to putting the snow tires on, and then a blizzard blew into town and now you’ve got to get to the grocery store on unplowed roads.

To that end the track is intentionally made tricky to drive, covered in thick powdery snow and with inclines, sharp turns and S-curves. Two features were particularly difficult: The first was a decreasing-radius downhill right-hander, and while trying to tackle it, I overestimated my ability, taking the turn too fast and hard. The car, pushed past the point of traction, simply went straight down the hill and sent me off the road into the powder despite my tender ministrations to the steering wheel, brake and gas.

The second tricky feature was a sweeping curve leading into an uphill straight covered in thick powder. Obviously you need to slow down to take the curve, but if you go too slow, you don’t have the momentum to get up the hill at the end of it and the wheels just spin in the powder. I could not figure out how to consistently take the curve with enough speed to then power up the hill without getting stuck.

After several laps of this, where the instructors were not allowed to offer any advice—the idea was to see how we did without any instruction—they were finally given the green light to chime in.

My instructor, Dean, told me to do something totally counterintuitive. Previously I had been trying to manage these tricky curves with delicacy and finesse, tapping the pedals and easing the wheel; but instead he told me, as soon as it looked like I would get stuck or lose traction, to give it a lot of gas and turn the wheel hard.

I did, expecting the tires to only spin fruitlessly faster while the car spun out. Instead something surprising happened. When I mashed down on the gas, instead of the engine revving into orbit it made a muted noise and the tachometer hardly moved; when I locked up the steering wheel the car didn’t spin out. Instead the car just kind of automatically corrected itself and gently moved through the turn, like a horse finding its footing and advancing. It was like the car figured it out. “Y’see that?” Dean asked, having recognized my skepticism.

In essence, he explained, it was indeed that the car was figuring it out. When I locked up the wheel and floored it, rather than inducing oversteer “the car is sensing that you want to go in that direction,” he explained, “and trying to get you there. So it’s borrowing a bit of left rear wheel brake, a bit of right front wheel acceleration, in order to auto-correct and essentially accomplish what you’re telling it to do.”

As someone who learned to drive a long time ago on “dumb” cars, this kind of blew my mind.

“Do it again and watch how the car just pivots into place at the end,” Dean said.

I did it, coasting into a turn and waiting until we lost traction, then hitting the gas hard and locking the steering wheel to the left. Same result as before: The car gradually transitioned from sliding sideways to correcting course and steadily moving forwards.

Dean explained that the average driver tends to overreact when losing control of a car, and that technology can now correct for that, which is why he had me “overreact.” This took me more than a few laps to wrap my head around. When I first learned to drive, the throttle, steering wheel and brake were analog controls that did directly what you told them to, occasionally to your own peril; now they’re more like an interface to provide interpretable instructions to the car.

The conventional wisdom is that cars will some day all be autonomous. But what I learned at the Chevy event is that current-day engineers are still thinking up all sorts of clever little features to make manual driving safer and easier.

Lastly, we’ll share with you the winter driving tips that the instructors gave us during the briefing. It’s below, verbatim.

Top 5 Little-Known Winter Driving Tips

Driving in wintery conditions is dangerous and there is fundamental advice given out every year about driving in winter weather. It includes: removing all snow and ice from your vehicle so you can see properly, making sure your tires and battery are in good shape and even carrying kitty litter in the trunk the event you get stuck.

We want to offer some additional little-known tips so you are prepared for this winter driving season:

1. The most dangerous/slippery temperature range between 24 – 34 degrees.

You likely have a mental note that anything below 32 degrees Fahrenheit is dangerous but in reality, the worst range is 24 – 34 degrees when there is snow or ice on the ground. Cars driving on a snow/ice covered surface in that range causes the snow/ice to melt and wet snow/ice has less grip than solid snow/ice.

2. Snow has 50% less grip than a dry surface, ice has 75% less grip.

We know that snow and ice offer less traction than a dry surface but most don’t realize how much less. Snow has half the traction of a dry surface and ice has 75% less grip. Adjust your driving (and braking!) accordingly.

3. Take off bulky coats and gloves.

Driving is a sensory experience and bulky gloves can mute the feedback through the steering wheel. It also makes it more difficult for you to operate the secondary controls like turn indicators and the heat. Bulky coats can restrict your arm movement and limit your reactions in the event of an emergency.

4. Turn down the heat.

Speaking of heat, you should avoid the urge to turn the interior of your vehicle into a sauna to chase the chill away. Keeping the inside of your car too warm can make you drowsy. You should remain alert at all times when driving, especially in winter conditions.

5. Don’t wear big snow boots.

Similar to the advice about gloves, big bulky boots make it more difficult to feel the accelerator and brake pedals. They can also slow your reaction time in an emergency situation.

Bonus tip: The easiest way to stay safe in a winter storm is to stay off the roads. But if you must drive, keep the tips above in mind.


Core77

What I Learned at Chevy’s Snow Driving Training Event

Chevrolet recently invited Core77 up to their Winter Drive program in Lime Rock, Connecticut, whereby they put journalists behind the wheel of a Chevy on a snow course accompanied by expert driving instructors. The idea is to teach you how to better navigate poor driving conditions in everyday, non-specialty vehicles.

To explain: The last snow-driving event I attended featured winterized, turbocharged four-wheel-drive vehicles outfitted with snow tires, and the emphasis was on speed/fun. In contrast, the appeal of this event is that it more closely mimics real-world situations: They put you in a plain-Jane Chevy Cruze with plain-ol’ all-season radials, as if you never got around to putting the snow tires on, and then a blizzard blew into town and now you’ve got to get to the grocery store on unplowed roads.

To that end the track is intentionally made tricky to drive, covered in thick powdery snow and with inclines, sharp turns and S-curves. Two features were particularly difficult: The first was a decreasing-radius downhill right-hander, and while trying to tackle it, I overestimated my ability, taking the turn too fast and hard. The car, pushed past the point of traction, simply went straight down the hill and sent me off the road into the powder despite my tender ministrations to the steering wheel, brake and gas.

The second tricky feature was a sweeping curve leading into an uphill straight covered in thick powder. Obviously you need to slow down to take the curve, but if you go too slow, you don’t have the momentum to get up the hill at the end of it and the wheels just spin in the powder. I could not figure out how to consistently take the curve with enough speed to then power up the hill without getting stuck.

After several laps of this, where the instructors were not allowed to offer any advice—the idea was to see how we did without any instruction—they were finally given the green light to chime in.

My instructor, Dean, told me to do something totally counterintuitive. Previously I had been trying to manage these tricky curves with delicacy and finesse, tapping the pedals and easing the wheel; but instead he told me, as soon as it looked like I would get stuck or lose traction, to give it a lot of gas and turn the wheel hard.

I did, expecting the tires to only spin fruitlessly faster while the car spun out. Instead something surprising happened. When I mashed down on the gas, instead of the engine revving into orbit it made a muted noise and the tachometer hardly moved; when I locked up the steering wheel the car didn’t spin out. Instead the car just kind of automatically corrected itself and gently moved through the turn, like a horse finding its footing and advancing. It was like the car figured it out. “Y’see that?” Dean asked, having recognized my skepticism.

In essence, he explained, it was indeed that the car was figuring it out. When I locked up the wheel and floored it, rather than inducing oversteer “the car is sensing that you want to go in that direction,” he explained, “and trying to get you there. So it’s borrowing a bit of left rear wheel brake, a bit of right front wheel acceleration, in order to auto-correct and essentially accomplish what you’re telling it to do.”

As someone who learned to drive a long time ago on “dumb” cars, this kind of blew my mind.

“Do it again and watch how the car just pivots into place at the end,” Dean said.

I did it, coasting into a turn and waiting until we lost traction, then hitting the gas hard and locking the steering wheel to the left. Same result as before: The car gradually transitioned from sliding sideways to correcting course and steadily moving forwards.

Dean explained that the average driver tends to overreact when losing control of a car, and that technology can now correct for that, which is why he had me “overreact.” This took me more than a few laps to wrap my head around. When I first learned to drive, the throttle, steering wheel and brake were analog controls that did directly what you told them to, occasionally to your own peril; now they’re more like an interface to provide interpretable instructions to the car.

The conventional wisdom is that cars will some day all be autonomous. But what I learned at the Chevy event is that current-day engineers are still thinking up all sorts of clever little features to make manual driving safer and easier.

Lastly, we’ll share with you the winter driving tips that the instructors gave us during the briefing. It’s below, verbatim.

Top 5 Little-Known Winter Driving Tips

Driving in wintery conditions is dangerous and there is fundamental advice given out every year about driving in winter weather. It includes: removing all snow and ice from your vehicle so you can see properly, making sure your tires and battery are in good shape and even carrying kitty litter in the trunk the event you get stuck.

We want to offer some additional little-known tips so you are prepared for this winter driving season:

1. The most dangerous/slippery temperature range between 24 – 34 degrees.

You likely have a mental note that anything below 32 degrees Fahrenheit is dangerous but in reality, the worst range is 24 – 34 degrees when there is snow or ice on the ground. Cars driving on a snow/ice covered surface in that range causes the snow/ice to melt and wet snow/ice has less grip than solid snow/ice.

2. Snow has 50% less grip than a dry surface, ice has 75% less grip.

We know that snow and ice offer less traction than a dry surface but most don’t realize how much less. Snow has half the traction of a dry surface and ice has 75% less grip. Adjust your driving (and braking!) accordingly.

3. Take off bulky coats and gloves.

Driving is a sensory experience and bulky gloves can mute the feedback through the steering wheel. It also makes it more difficult for you to operate the secondary controls like turn indicators and the heat. Bulky coats can restrict your arm movement and limit your reactions in the event of an emergency.

4. Turn down the heat.

Speaking of heat, you should avoid the urge to turn the interior of your vehicle into a sauna to chase the chill away. Keeping the inside of your car too warm can make you drowsy. You should remain alert at all times when driving, especially in winter conditions.

5. Don’t wear big snow boots.

Similar to the advice about gloves, big bulky boots make it more difficult to feel the accelerator and brake pedals. They can also slow your reaction time in an emergency situation.

Bonus tip: The easiest way to stay safe in a winter storm is to stay off the roads. But if you must drive, keep the tips above in mind.


Core77

What I Learned at Chevy’s Snow Driving Training Event

Chevrolet recently invited Core77 up to their Winter Drive program in Lime Rock, Connecticut, whereby they put journalists behind the wheel of a Chevy on a snow course accompanied by expert driving instructors. The idea is to teach you how to better navigate poor driving conditions in everyday, non-specialty vehicles.

To explain: The last snow-driving event I attended featured winterized, turbocharged four-wheel-drive vehicles outfitted with snow tires, and the emphasis was on speed/fun. In contrast, the appeal of this event is that it more closely mimics real-world situations: They put you in a plain-Jane Chevy Cruze with plain-ol’ all-season radials, as if you never got around to putting the snow tires on, and then a blizzard blew into town and now you’ve got to get to the grocery store on unplowed roads.

To that end the track is intentionally made tricky to drive, covered in thick powdery snow and with inclines, sharp turns and S-curves. Two features were particularly difficult: The first was a decreasing-radius downhill right-hander, and while trying to tackle it, I overestimated my ability, taking the turn too fast and hard. The car, pushed past the point of traction, simply went straight down the hill and sent me off the road into the powder despite my tender ministrations to the steering wheel, brake and gas.

The second tricky feature was a sweeping curve leading into an uphill straight covered in thick powder. Obviously you need to slow down to take the curve, but if you go too slow, you don’t have the momentum to get up the hill at the end of it and the wheels just spin in the powder. I could not figure out how to consistently take the curve with enough speed to then power up the hill without getting stuck.

After several laps of this, where the instructors were not allowed to offer any advice—the idea was to see how we did without any instruction—they were finally given the green light to chime in.

My instructor, Dean, told me to do something totally counterintuitive. Previously I had been trying to manage these tricky curves with delicacy and finesse, tapping the pedals and easing the wheel; but instead he told me, as soon as it looked like I would get stuck or lose traction, to give it a lot of gas and turn the wheel hard.

I did, expecting the tires to only spin fruitlessly faster while the car spun out. Instead something surprising happened. When I mashed down on the gas, instead of the engine revving into orbit it made a muted noise and the tachometer hardly moved; when I locked up the steering wheel the car didn’t spin out. Instead the car just kind of automatically corrected itself and gently moved through the turn, like a horse finding its footing and advancing. It was like the car figured it out. “Y’see that?” Dean asked, having recognized my skepticism.

In essence, he explained, it was indeed that the car was figuring it out. When I locked up the wheel and floored it, rather than inducing oversteer “the car is sensing that you want to go in that direction,” he explained, “and trying to get you there. So it’s borrowing a bit of left rear wheel brake, a bit of right front wheel acceleration, in order to auto-correct and essentially accomplish what you’re telling it to do.”

As someone who learned to drive a long time ago on “dumb” cars, this kind of blew my mind.

“Do it again and watch how the car just pivots into place at the end,” Dean said.

I did it, coasting into a turn and waiting until we lost traction, then hitting the gas hard and locking the steering wheel to the left. Same result as before: The car gradually transitioned from sliding sideways to correcting course and steadily moving forwards.

Dean explained that the average driver tends to overreact when losing control of a car, and that technology can now correct for that, which is why he had me “overreact.” This took me more than a few laps to wrap my head around. When I first learned to drive, the throttle, steering wheel and brake were analog controls that did directly what you told them to, occasionally to your own peril; now they’re more like an interface to provide interpretable instructions to the car.

The conventional wisdom is that cars will some day all be autonomous. But what I learned at the Chevy event is that current-day engineers are still thinking up all sorts of clever little features to make manual driving safer and easier.

Lastly, we’ll share with you the winter driving tips that the instructors gave us during the briefing. It’s below, verbatim.

Top 5 Little-Known Winter Driving Tips

Driving in wintery conditions is dangerous and there is fundamental advice given out every year about driving in winter weather. It includes: removing all snow and ice from your vehicle so you can see properly, making sure your tires and battery are in good shape and even carrying kitty litter in the trunk the event you get stuck.

We want to offer some additional little-known tips so you are prepared for this winter driving season:

1. The most dangerous/slippery temperature range between 24 – 34 degrees.

You likely have a mental note that anything below 32 degrees Fahrenheit is dangerous but in reality, the worst range is 24 – 34 degrees when there is snow or ice on the ground. Cars driving on a snow/ice covered surface in that range causes the snow/ice to melt and wet snow/ice has less grip than solid snow/ice.

2. Snow has 50% less grip than a dry surface, ice has 75% less grip.

We know that snow and ice offer less traction than a dry surface but most don’t realize how much less. Snow has half the traction of a dry surface and ice has 75% less grip. Adjust your driving (and braking!) accordingly.

3. Take off bulky coats and gloves.

Driving is a sensory experience and bulky gloves can mute the feedback through the steering wheel. It also makes it more difficult for you to operate the secondary controls like turn indicators and the heat. Bulky coats can restrict your arm movement and limit your reactions in the event of an emergency.

4. Turn down the heat.

Speaking of heat, you should avoid the urge to turn the interior of your vehicle into a sauna to chase the chill away. Keeping the inside of your car too warm can make you drowsy. You should remain alert at all times when driving, especially in winter conditions.

5. Don’t wear big snow boots.

Similar to the advice about gloves, big bulky boots make it more difficult to feel the accelerator and brake pedals. They can also slow your reaction time in an emergency situation.

Bonus tip: The easiest way to stay safe in a winter storm is to stay off the roads. But if you must drive, keep the tips above in mind.


Core77

What Have You Learned from Designing for Someone Unlike Yourself?

For this week’s Forum Frenzy, an aspiring designer asks our knowledgeable audience of designers about their day-to-day: 

“As someone thinking of getting into design I have a question: as a normal designer how much ability do you have to make designs fit your taste? How often do you have to completely disregard your taste in the design process? Do you ever have the opportunity to be free to do whatever you want (within reason) like an artist?”

As iab notes in this discussion board, having projects that match perfectly with your own passions are probably quite rare: 

“Even if I were to be a customer of that design, my input is n=1. The companies that hire me usually have a minimum of a $ 50MM market potential for a product they want me to design. Since I won’t spend 50 million annually on their product, hopefully you can see that my taste should never drive the design. Through user research, there is a possibility the design could match my tastes, but that is yet to happen in 25 years.” 

The original question, although simple, does lead us to some interesting thoughts and counter questions. The truth is, working designers do often have to design for a different type of consumer, but what is the ultimate advantage of designing for someone different from yourself? What can you learn from these experiences?

If you are a designer, you have a unique perspective on human empathy in that your practice relies on understanding not just audiences but individuals; and oftentimes, individuals with very particular behaviors or needs. This focus on individuals presents certain challenges—for example, how can you relate to someone who has clear physical differences or emotional needs? 

Simulation gloves by Cambridge’s Engineering Design Centre that allows designers to experience usability of products as someone with arthritis. 

We’ve seen several recent examples of empathetic innovations like Cambridge’s inclusive experience kit for designers or interesting case studies such as Japan’s Work Life Promotion Campaign illustrating interesting ways designers can work to understand the people they are creating products for. So what can these examples teach us how to look at designing for people unlike ourselves?

What are some key takeaways you’ve gotten from designing for different users that have improved your work? What design research tips do you have for aspiring students to promote empathy and understanding in designers so we create better, more intuitive and relatable products?

Contribute to the conversation in the comments below or on the original discussion board!


Core77

What Pinterest learned in two years working on its search engine

New pinterest search filter About two years ago, Pinterest launched a different flavor of search engine called Guided Search. Instead of relying on deep data on the user, it would create a network of related topics that users can dive deep into. The idea being that a search like “iPhone” would net additional categories, like “design,” “hardware,” and such. Now Guided Search is about… Read More


TechCrunch

The Google autonomous car has learned how to honk

Filed under: ,,,,

The Google car team has recently been teaching the car’s AI when and how to honk the horn and give the human drivers on the road a helpful heads up.

Continue reading The Google autonomous car has learned how to honk

The Google autonomous car has learned how to honk originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 03 Jun 2016 18:01:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog

’25 Things I’ve Learned’ – Artist Writes 25 Inspiring Advices

0

A few time ago, artist Sean Wes shares 25 things he learned when he turned 25 through the beautiful typography of old-fashioned handwriting. All are very good advice, not just personally but professionally. Here they are in no particular order. Hope you’ll get inspired too!

Learn & Never Quit

1
The older I get, the more I observe I have to learn, and that excites me greatly. We should never arrive at a place where we’re no longer learning. It is a life-long effort.

Be Driven

2
There are enough articles with hacks on being productive to fill an ocean. I’ve contributed my fair share of those tips. But the cold, hard truth is that it comes down to a choice to be driven. All else flows from that.

Make Things, Not Excuses

3
If you look for reasons why you can’t do something, you will find them. Leave excuses to the lazy. That’s not you.

You Have to Say No to a Lot of Good Things…

4
…In Order to Be Able to Say Yes to a Lot of Great Things. This is one of the hardest lessons I’ve learned. Freedom comes from saying no. It’s hard at first, but with time you will gain more control over your life. Saying “no” is a practice.

Tools Do Not a Craftsman Make

5
“What pens do you use?” “Where do you get your tools?” I hear these questions a lot. It’s understandable. We’re all susceptible to thinking that if we only had the magic device, we could create like the person we look up to. But a tool is a tool. True craftsmen are such with or without them.

You Are More Than What You Do

6
“What do you do?” This is a common question we get. Our response is often so frequently repeated and knee-jerk that we get our identity wrapped up in our profession. But if this is the case, what happens when the job is suddenly taken from us? Who are we then? It’s important to separate ourselves from our vocation in this manner.

Press On

7
If you really want to know whether you’re passionate about something, keep pushing through the opposition.

Endurance is the Price Tag of Achievement

8
You won’t know whether or not you love something until you’re on the other side of resistance.

Don’t Be So Hard on Yourself

9
In contrast to the two previous pieces, sometimes you really do deserve a break. As a chronic creator and perfectionist, I need this reminder especially.

Focus On What Matters

10
It’s easy to get caught up in the superfluous. Take a step back and evaluate the important things in your life (Hint: they’re usually not things).

Giving is the Best Way to be Fulfilled

11
You know what feels great? Getting things. You know what feels even better? Giving things.

Inspiration is Everywhere

12
You don’t have to look far, you just have to look for it.

Do What Makes You Come Alive

13
When you start with money, you give it the power to dictate what you do with your life. Start with the passion. Start with the doing.

Build Things You Enjoy

14
When you enjoy what you make, so will others enjoy it.

What Are You Not Doing?

15
It’s a matter of priority.

Recharge

16
I can’t stress enough that you need recharge time. It’s not uncommon for me to work 12–16 hour days regularly. I feel like I’m getting a million things done, but at what long term cost? Take time to recharge.

You Will Never Influence the World By Trying to Be Like It

17
We need people who are not afraid to be different. All advancement requires it. Don’t worry about what other people think. It’s time to take a stand.

Those Who Are Doing Things You Admire…

18
We all have the same allotment of time. What are you doing with yours?

Deliberate Practice

19
Practice is good, but purposeful practice is better. Practicing deliberately is what will produce tangible results rather than mere passive improvement. Learn to set clear objectives to help squeeze more productive juice out of the time you already spend practicing.

Start That Thing You’ve Been Putting Off Today

20
You know what I’m talking about.

Make More Things This Year

21
This is my annual aspiration.

Life is Happening Outside Your Screens

22
We get so caught up in this digital world. Look around every once in awhile. Don’t miss life.

Practice Makes Perfect

23
There are no shortcuts. There are no shortcuts. There are no shortcuts.

Make Your Own Luck

24
I’m tired of hearing excuses. We all have different starting points. Hard work always wins.

Ampersand Lifestyle

25
My motto: Create. Enjoy Life. Make Things. Be Passionate. Dream Big.


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.