Tag Archives: laser

The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 4: Laser Cutting, Plastic Welding

Here in Part 4, the prototype of the mobile solar charging platform starts to take shape. Industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, shows us the tricks of the trade:

– Using a laser cutter on the styrene forms that he vacuum-formed last time, he’s able to get precise shapes in a compound-curved surface

– When cutting out parts that don’t require an entire sheet of material, he uses the opportunity to cut extra test parts out of the extra material

– The versatility of styrene, which he’s even able to fashion hinges out of

– The benefits of wet sanding, and the importance of sanding blocks

– How to solvent-weld plastic with great precision

Check it out:


Core77

The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 4: Laser Cutting, Plastic Welding

Here in Part 4, the prototype of the mobile solar charging platform starts to take shape. Industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, shows us the tricks of the trade:

– Using a laser cutter on the styrene forms that he vacuum-formed last time, he’s able to get precise shapes in a compound-curved surface

– When cutting out parts that don’t require an entire sheet of material, he uses the opportunity to cut extra test parts out of the extra material

– The versatility of styrene, which he’s even able to fashion hinges out of

– The benefits of wet sanding, and the importance of sanding blocks

– How to solvent-weld plastic with great precision

Check it out:


Core77

The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 4: Laser Cutting, Plastic Welding

Here in Part 4, the prototype of the mobile solar charging platform starts to take shape. Industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, shows us the tricks of the trade:

– Using a laser cutter on the styrene forms that he vacuum-formed last time, he’s able to get precise shapes in a compound-curved surface

– When cutting out parts that don’t require an entire sheet of material, he uses the opportunity to cut extra test parts out of the extra material

– The versatility of styrene, which he’s even able to fashion hinges out of

– The benefits of wet sanding, and the importance of sanding blocks

– How to solvent-weld plastic with great precision

Check it out:


Core77

Using the Glowforge Laser Cutter, Improving an Improbable Sawmill Design, Building a Disney Prop & More

Bulleit Sign Build and Install

It’s fun watching Jimmy DiResta install the letters of this steel sign he made for Bulleit HQ down in Kentucky. I like the layout trick he uses:

Blower Housing Shape Experiments

This will appeal to the technical-minded among you. Matthias Wandel combines science and functional design, conducting a series of measurable experiments in order to determine the ideal shape of a blower housing for a dust collector. He makes an interesting discovery concerning which is more important, CFM or static pressure:

Bandsaw-on-a-Dolly Sawmill Improvements

Matthias analyzes the flaws of his bandsaw-on-a-dolly rig, designs and builds some improvements, then identifies more potential improvements. Be sure to check out his excellent explanation at the end, which cleverly uses a carrot as a demonstrative tool:

Building a Metal Carport – Part 1

Seems like there’s nothing April Wilkerson can’t do. This week she tackles her largest project to date, a 20′ x 24′ steel carport for her folks’ property:

Kid Size Maui’s Hook from a 2×4

Marc Spagnuolo’s son loves the Disney movie Moana, so here makes him a version of demigod Maui’s magical hook:

Using the Glowforge Laser Cutter

Glowforge backers have had to be patient, but here David Picciuto’s got his hands on a pre-production model and demonstrates its use. There is a brief hiccup with a hold-down issue, which he handily fixes with a couple of pennies:


Core77

Using the Glowforge Laser Cutter, Improving an Improbable Sawmill Design, Building a Disney Prop & More

Bulleit Sign Build and Install

It’s fun watching Jimmy DiResta install the letters of this steel sign he made for Bulleit HQ down in Kentucky. I like the layout trick he uses:

Blower Housing Shape Experiments

This will appeal to the technical-minded among you. Matthias Wandel combines science and functional design, conducting a series of measurable experiments in order to determine the ideal shape of a blower housing for a dust collector. He makes an interesting discovery concerning which is more important, CFM or static pressure:

Bandsaw-on-a-Dolly Sawmill Improvements

Matthias analyzes the flaws of his bandsaw-on-a-dolly rig, designs and builds some improvements, then identifies more potential improvements. Be sure to check out his excellent explanation at the end, which cleverly uses a carrot as a demonstrative tool:

Building a Metal Carport – Part 1

Seems like there’s nothing April Wilkerson can’t do. This week she tackles her largest project to date, a 20′ x 24′ steel carport for her folks’ property:

Kid Size Maui’s Hook from a 2×4

Marc Spagnuolo’s son loves the Disney movie Moana, so here makes him a version of demigod Maui’s magical hook:

Using the Glowforge Laser Cutter

Glowforge backers have had to be patient, but here David Picciuto’s got his hands on a pre-production model and demonstrates its use. There is a brief hiccup with a hold-down issue, which he handily fixes with a couple of pennies:


Core77

Using the Glowforge Laser Cutter, Improving an Improbable Sawmill Design, Building a Disney Prop & More

Bulleit Sign Build and Install

It’s fun watching Jimmy DiResta install the letters of this steel sign he made for Bulleit HQ down in Kentucky. I like the layout trick he uses:

Blower Housing Shape Experiments

This will appeal to the technical-minded among you. Matthias Wandel combines science and functional design, conducting a series of measurable experiments in order to determine the ideal shape of a blower housing for a dust collector. He makes an interesting discovery concerning which is more important, CFM or static pressure:

Bandsaw-on-a-Dolly Sawmill Improvements

Matthias analyzes the flaws of his bandsaw-on-a-dolly rig, designs and builds some improvements, then identifies more potential improvements. Be sure to check out his excellent explanation at the end, which cleverly uses a carrot as a demonstrative tool:

Building a Metal Carport – Part 1

Seems like there’s nothing April Wilkerson can’t do. This week she tackles her largest project to date, a 20′ x 24′ steel carport for her folks’ property:

Kid Size Maui’s Hook from a 2×4

Marc Spagnuolo’s son loves the Disney movie Moana, so here makes him a version of demigod Maui’s magical hook:

Using the Glowforge Laser Cutter

Glowforge backers have had to be patient, but here David Picciuto’s got his hands on a pre-production model and demonstrates its use. There is a brief hiccup with a hold-down issue, which he handily fixes with a couple of pennies:


Core77

Drake Anthony’s Death-Ray-Laser-Equipped Robot Spider and “Laser Shotgun”

Yeah, so this is terrifying:

That’s the creation of science student Drake Anthony, whose nom de YouTube is The DIY Laser Guy. Anthony started with a toy called an “Attacknid,” which can fire foam darts and balls, and upgraded its firepower with almost alarming ease:

Anthony called it “my most terrifying laser creation as of yet”…but that was in 2013. The following year he upgraded it with a camera so that he could guide it to destroy things without needing to be in the room:

The spider-bot is armed with a 2-watt laser. More recently, Anthony created a “laser shotgun” with an effective 40 watts:

I’m digging Anthony’s earnest presentation and how you can hear his voice getting deeper over the years. Also, it’s bright kids like this that will propel us into the future. I think all of us Americans dream of the day that we can stop arguing about gun control, and start arguing about laser control!


Core77

Awesome tech you can’t buy yet: Robot subs, laser cutters, a $300 3D printer

Check out our roundup of the coolest crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the Web this week. You can’t buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!

The post Awesome tech you can’t buy yet: Robot subs, laser cutters, a $ 300 3D printer appeared first on Digital Trends.

Digital Trends

Young Farmers Develop Sub-$100 Laser Scanner

Jason Smith and Weston Downs knew each other in high school. They had to; there were only five people in their entire class. Both raised on farms in small-town Montana, they parted ways after graduation, with Smith attending Harvard to study engineering, while Downs attended Montana State U. to study aviation. But once their degrees were earned, the pair returned to their family farms, which is good news for the digital fabrication community: Because it is there, in Big Timber, Montana, that they developed the CowTech Ciclop, a $ 99 open source 3D scanner.

“Our scanner is a fully open source machine, strongly based off the BQ Ciclop, an open source scanner made by the Spanish tech company BQ,” write Smith. “[It’s also] the first 3D laser scanner on the market under $ 100, shattering every competing price-point.” Take a look:

At press time there were 27 days left to pledge, but Smith and Downs were already 600% funded; they’d sought just ten large, and to date have netted $ 60,000-plus.

It’s clever and practical to let users print their own components in order to keep the price down. We were also intrigued by Smith and Downs’ story; with a company name like CowTech, and an engineer pitching a digital fabrication add-on while wearing a T-shirt that says “Trust Me – I’m a Farmer,” you’ve got our attention. 

Jason Smith
Weston Downs

We connected with Smith for a brief Q&A:

Core77: Is CowTech the name only of the scanner, or is it a company that you’ll be launching more products from in the future?

Jason Smith: Ciclop is the name of the Scanner, CowTech is the name of our company that we plan to launch further products from, as well as a prototyping and design service. Our short term plans for projects are not set, we will finish this campaign before deciding on another one.

We plan to pick products that are enjoyable to design that also have market potential, and eventually plan to create products that are very applicable to farming and ranching. We have a number of ideas in the pipeline, but we aren’t ready to release any of them yet.

What motivated you to return home after college?

A lot of things motivated my return to the family ranch. It was always my plan when I left home, to come back to it. Ranching is a way of life that is incredibly unique. It’s hard to explain to people who weren’t born and raised on a farm or ranch but you develop a connection to the land, the cattle, the lifestyle, that is hard to find anywhere else.

I wanted to go somewhere out of the state and away from home for college, just so I had a chance to see what else was out there. It’s easy to be a little sheltered coming from a rural Montana community, and there is a big world out there. Interestingly, the city and all its opportunities and offerings helped me develop a greater appreciation for the lifestyle that I grew up with. After 4 years in Boston, there was little doubt in my mind that my ranch back home in Montana was where I wanted to return to.

Can you describe the different types of satisfaction gained in successfully executing farmwork versus solving a technological/engineering problem?

There are many obvious surface differences between engineering and ranching, but at their core they have many of the same draws. You put in hours of labor and sweat equity, but at the end of the day there is such tangible proof of the job you have done as well as a feeling of meaning that doesn’t come with many jobs.

In many cases, ranching is engineering on a smaller scale. Miles from town, you can’t afford to drive to the parts store on a whim. You often have to design a way to keep things working, at least temporarily, to get the job done. This kind of on-the-job makeshift engineering is a lot of what made me want to be an engineer, and where Weston derives much of his engineering talent. Whether we are on the tractor or inside running the laser cutter, we are solving engineering problems every day.


Core77

Glowforge: Democratizing Laser Cutting with an Inexpensive, Easy to Use Machine

For many would-be makers, there are barriers aplenty that can keep one from realizing one’s dreams. One of the first barriers is not having access to the right tools—the welding rig, 3D printer, laser cutter etc. that you need for your project—or the know-how to work one. But thankfully companies like Glowforge are ready to step in and become barrier removers, by designing better, cheaper tools that are easier to use than their forebears.

Glowforge is currently democratizing laser cutting by designing an affordable, easy-to-use laser cutter/printer that takes clever advantage of software. By integrating affordable smartphone cameras linked to software, their machine enables you to do things like draw directly on your part and have the laser trace-cut it (once you’ve removed your hand, naturally). The hassles of part alignment are all done on the screen of your smart device, rather than on the physical bed of the machine, giving you a WYSIWYG interface that reduces errors. And they reckon that their eponymous machine can rival a $ 10,000-plus laser cutter, but for just under two grand.

Personalized hardwood skin for Macbook Pro / Print Time: 19min / Material Cost: $ 9.00
Plywood iPhone stand / Print Time: 42min / Material Cost: $ 12.00
Walnut veneer Macbook keyboard caps / Print Time: 33min / Material Cost: $ 12.00
Stacked contrasting pen holder / Print Time: 29min / Material Cost: $ 8.00
Engraved glass spice jars / Print Time: 9min / Material Cost: $ 10.00
Kip leather custom satchel / Print Time: 133min / Material Cost: $ 58.00

Take a look at some of the things they’ve produced:

Check out how easy this looks to use:

Here’s a more in-depth video, for those of you interested in the technology behind it, and some of the early successes that drove company founder Dan Shapiro to develop the machine:

For the next 26 days, they’re taking pre-orders for the machine at an astonishing 50% off (i.e. the $ 4,000 model is going for $ 1,995), with shipping scheduled for December of this year. Demand is apparently strong: In the four days since the sale began, they’d racked up $ 3,052,002 in sales!


Core77

A Laser Gizmo That Helps You Drill Straight

Learning to drill a hole perfectly perpendicular to your surface is a crucial DIY skill. If you’re drilling downwards into a horizontal surface in front of you, it’s easy enough to see if you’re leaning the drill along the X-axis, but a little trickier to tell if you’re off in the Y-axis. Now a company called Cerwin Tools has developed a little laser gizmo they reckon will help you get it perfect.

Called the BullseyeBore, it’s a small plastic disc with laser optics inside. You chuck it into your drill along with your bit, and then it projects easy-to-see concentric circles. By gauging the gap between the circles, one can thus tell when you’re perpendicular or not:

I’d never use one myself, but I think the device is a neat idea. And it might make a good gift to encourage the uncoordinated to start working on their drilling skills.

_____________________________________________________________

See Also: A Brilliant Design Feature that All Cordless Drills Should Have


Core77

Uncover gives your MacBook’s lid a new, Apple-less kind of glow

Uncover gives your MacBook's lid a new kind of glow

Etsy stickers adorning your MacBook’s lid, oft making a cute play on the presence of that glowing Apple? That’s so 2012. Uncover, a Dutch company showcasing its talents here at The Next Web Conference in Amsterdam this week, has crafted a new method of customizing one’s MacBook lid. And, perhaps most importantly, it involves the seamless removal of the Apple logo altogether. In essence, these guys use a specialized laser cutting process that can etch out anything your brain can muster — from band logos to company mantras. And, as you’ll see in the gallery below, the Apple logo doesn’t have to be a part of the equation.

The outfit will take in any aluminum-faced MacBook from around the world, and once it lands in Holland, you’ll typically see it headed back to your domicile within four to five days. If you’re selecting one of Uncover’s designs, you can have your machine tweaked for as little as €249 (around $325), while completely custom work starts at €599 ($780). (And yes, you can just buy a totally new Mac from Uncover as well.) We spoke to Jasper Middendorp, the company’s CEO, and he confessed that only MacBooks are being accepted due to Apple’s unique backlighting arrangement. They’re obviously keen to offer similar work for PCs, but to date, every one he has seen blocks or covers the backlight in some way. For those looking to get it on the fun, allow the source link below to be your guide.

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Source: Uncover

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Uncover gives your MacBook’s lid a new, Apple-less kind of glow

Image aftermathmega.jpg

The After Math: beer, lasers and $5K 4K TVs

Welcome to The After Math, where we attempt to summarize this week’s tech news through numbers, decimal places and percentages

The After Math Samsung's literal Mega phone, lasers and 4K TVs for $4K

In a bid to neatly wrap up this week’s events, we gaze at some high-priced 4K gear at NAB 2013, figure out whether we can physically… pocket either of Samsung’s Galaxy Mega variants and think about lasers: sometimes beautiful, sometimes deadly and sometimes fighting the future war against drones. We’ve got the numbers — and a few dollar signs — right after the break.

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The After Math: beer, lasers and $5K 4K TVs

Image laser-camera-lead.jpg

Laser scans objects in 3D from half a mile away, scientists just need reason to use it

Laser scans objects in 3D from half a mile away, scientists look for excuse to fire it

3D scanning at a range of 0.62 miles? It just became possible, thanks to a laser camera developed by physicists at Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh, UK. You can pretty much see how it works from the images above — laser beams are bounced off the target and the duration of their return journey is measured precisely enough to detect millimeter depth changes even at extreme distances. Speaking of which, the researchers believe they could pump the range up to 10 miles with a bit of extra research, and even shrink the blaster down to make it “fully portable” in less than five years. Who knows, someday it might even work around corners. But there’s a problem: skin doesn’t reflect the beams properly, which means people can’t be accurately scanned unless they also happen to be ringwraiths. As a result, the researchers seem slightly at loss as to what to do with the technology, with their best suggestions so far being watching the growth of foliage or tracking the movement of rocks. We’d try to think up some other ideas, were it not for the distracting and utterly irrelevant Nazgul v Wilhelm video embedded after the break.

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Source: Heriot Watt

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Laser scans objects in 3D from half a mile away, scientists just need reason to use it

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US Navy to deploy ship-mounted laser in 2014, blasts drones in the meantime (video)

US Navy to deploy ship-mounted laser in 2014, blasts drones in the meantime (video)

Lasers have been flaunted by the US Navy before, but now it’s announced that 2014 will see the very first solid-state laser deployed aboard a ship, two years ahead of schedule. The USS Ponce, a vessel used as an amphibious transport dock stationed in the Persian Gulf, will get the honor of hosting the prototype Laser Weapon System (LaWS). Not only can the hardware set boats and airborne drones ablaze, but it can also emit a burst to “dazzle” an opponent’s sensors without inflicting physical harm. Sure, it cost roughly $32 million to construct, but the price is expected to fall when it hits wider production, and Chief of Naval Research Rear Admiral Matthew Klunder estimates that it each shot rings up at under $1. It may not be the missile-obliterating free-electron laser that the Navy’s been lusting for, but we’re sure it doesn’t matter much to drones at the end of the beam. Hit the jump to for a video of the contraption in action.

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Via: The Register

Source: US Navy (1), (2)

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US Navy to deploy ship-mounted laser in 2014, blasts drones in the meantime (video)