Tag Archives: largest

Europe’s Largest Abandoned Underground Military Air Base


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

Željava Air Base, situated on the border between Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina under Plješevica Mountain, near the city of Bihać, Bosnia, was the largest underground airport and military air base in the former Yugoslavia, and one of the largest in Europe.

During two decades more than £4 billion was spent on its construction.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The facilities are shared by the local governments of Bihać and Lika-Senj County in Croatia. Construction of the Željava or Bihać Air Base, code-named “Objekat 505”, began in 1948 and was completed in 1968. During those two decades, SFRJ spent approximately $ 6 billion on its construction, three times the combined current annual military budgets of Serbia and Croatia. It was one of the largest and most expensive military construction projects in Europe.

The base was destroyed by Serbs to stop it falling into the hands of the enemy.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The role of the facility was to establish, integrate, and coordinate a nationwide early warning radar network in SFRJ akin to NORAD. The complex was designed and built to sustain a direct hit from a 20-kiloton nuclear bomb, equivalent to the one dropped on Nagasaki. The main advantage of the base was the strategic location of its “Celopek” intercept and surveillance radar on Mount Pljesevica, at the nerve center of an advanced integrated air defense network covering the airspace and territory of Yugoslavia, and possibly further.

Objekat 505 was one of the largest military constructions in Europe.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

In addition to its main roles as a protected radar installation, control center, and secure communications facility, the airbase contained underground tunnels housing two full fighter squadrons, one reconnaissance squadron, and associated maintenance facilities. Today, the base often serves as a waypoint for illegal migrants.

The eerie military base is on the Croatian border with Bosnia-Herzegovina.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

A facility for asylum seekers was scheduled to open there in 2004 or 2005, but the idea was abandoned, and new plans were developed for it to become part of the Slunj military training grounds, and barracks from the nearby Udbina complex. This idea was dropped, however, in line with the agreement between the countries of former Yugoslavia.

Many of the aircraft destroyed in conflicts have been abandoned at the site.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The underground base is still surrounded by deadly minefields.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

Many of the aircraft were either destroyed by NATO bombings or left to rot.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The only visitors now are the migrants who sometimes shelter there.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

There are still a few rusting remains of MIG fighters on the site.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The underground tunnels once housed entire squadrons of aircraft.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Europe’s Largest Abandoned Underground Military Air Base


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

Željava Air Base, situated on the border between Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina under Plješevica Mountain, near the city of Bihać, Bosnia, was the largest underground airport and military air base in the former Yugoslavia, and one of the largest in Europe.

During two decades more than £4 billion was spent on its construction.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The facilities are shared by the local governments of Bihać and Lika-Senj County in Croatia. Construction of the Željava or Bihać Air Base, code-named “Objekat 505”, began in 1948 and was completed in 1968. During those two decades, SFRJ spent approximately $ 6 billion on its construction, three times the combined current annual military budgets of Serbia and Croatia. It was one of the largest and most expensive military construction projects in Europe.

The base was destroyed by Serbs to stop it falling into the hands of the enemy.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The role of the facility was to establish, integrate, and coordinate a nationwide early warning radar network in SFRJ akin to NORAD. The complex was designed and built to sustain a direct hit from a 20-kiloton nuclear bomb, equivalent to the one dropped on Nagasaki. The main advantage of the base was the strategic location of its “Celopek” intercept and surveillance radar on Mount Pljesevica, at the nerve center of an advanced integrated air defense network covering the airspace and territory of Yugoslavia, and possibly further.

Objekat 505 was one of the largest military constructions in Europe.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

In addition to its main roles as a protected radar installation, control center, and secure communications facility, the airbase contained underground tunnels housing two full fighter squadrons, one reconnaissance squadron, and associated maintenance facilities. Today, the base often serves as a waypoint for illegal migrants.

The eerie military base is on the Croatian border with Bosnia-Herzegovina.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

A facility for asylum seekers was scheduled to open there in 2004 or 2005, but the idea was abandoned, and new plans were developed for it to become part of the Slunj military training grounds, and barracks from the nearby Udbina complex. This idea was dropped, however, in line with the agreement between the countries of former Yugoslavia.

Many of the aircraft destroyed in conflicts have been abandoned at the site.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The underground base is still surrounded by deadly minefields.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

Many of the aircraft were either destroyed by NATO bombings or left to rot.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The only visitors now are the migrants who sometimes shelter there.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

There are still a few rusting remains of MIG fighters on the site.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The underground tunnels once housed entire squadrons of aircraft.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Europe’s Largest Abandoned Underground Military Air Base


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

Željava Air Base, situated on the border between Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina under Plješevica Mountain, near the city of Bihać, Bosnia, was the largest underground airport and military air base in the former Yugoslavia, and one of the largest in Europe.

During two decades more than £4 billion was spent on its construction.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The facilities are shared by the local governments of Bihać and Lika-Senj County in Croatia. Construction of the Željava or Bihać Air Base, code-named “Objekat 505”, began in 1948 and was completed in 1968. During those two decades, SFRJ spent approximately $ 6 billion on its construction, three times the combined current annual military budgets of Serbia and Croatia. It was one of the largest and most expensive military construction projects in Europe.

The base was destroyed by Serbs to stop it falling into the hands of the enemy.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The role of the facility was to establish, integrate, and coordinate a nationwide early warning radar network in SFRJ akin to NORAD. The complex was designed and built to sustain a direct hit from a 20-kiloton nuclear bomb, equivalent to the one dropped on Nagasaki. The main advantage of the base was the strategic location of its “Celopek” intercept and surveillance radar on Mount Pljesevica, at the nerve center of an advanced integrated air defense network covering the airspace and territory of Yugoslavia, and possibly further.

Objekat 505 was one of the largest military constructions in Europe.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

In addition to its main roles as a protected radar installation, control center, and secure communications facility, the airbase contained underground tunnels housing two full fighter squadrons, one reconnaissance squadron, and associated maintenance facilities. Today, the base often serves as a waypoint for illegal migrants.

The eerie military base is on the Croatian border with Bosnia-Herzegovina.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

A facility for asylum seekers was scheduled to open there in 2004 or 2005, but the idea was abandoned, and new plans were developed for it to become part of the Slunj military training grounds, and barracks from the nearby Udbina complex. This idea was dropped, however, in line with the agreement between the countries of former Yugoslavia.

Many of the aircraft destroyed in conflicts have been abandoned at the site.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The underground base is still surrounded by deadly minefields.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

Many of the aircraft were either destroyed by NATO bombings or left to rot.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The only visitors now are the migrants who sometimes shelter there.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

There are still a few rusting remains of MIG fighters on the site.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media

The underground tunnels once housed entire squadrons of aircraft.


Thomas Windisch/Exclusivepix Media


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Tesla Gigafactory to get world’s largest rooftop solar array

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Touring investors got insights into the Gigafactory’s inner workings.

Continue reading Tesla Gigafactory to get world’s largest rooftop solar array

Tesla Gigafactory to get world’s largest rooftop solar array originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 13 Jan 2017 17:30:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog

Former NASA Engineer is Not Messing Around, Builds World’s Largest Nerf Gun

First released in 2005, the Nerf N-Strike Maverick REV-6 has become a toy design classic. The six-round revolver fires foam darts, but former NASA engineer and current science YouTuber Mark Rober decided that wasn’t enough foampower for him. Thus he created, with a little help, this rather scaled-up version that fires plunger-tipped pool noodles:

Okay, that was the kid-friendly video. Ryan and David of Eclectical Engineering subsequently replaced the air system with a black powder cannon, inadvisably creating something with true firepower. While we’re not willing to embed the latter video here, the curious among you can check it out on their channel.


Core77

The World’s Largest Timber-Framed Building is Almost Complete—and It’s a Replica of Noah’s Ark

Who has the world’s largest timber-framed building? A developer in Kentucky claims his organization holds the title. Ken Ham, the president of a religious group called Answers in Genesis, has been constructing a gargantuan replica of Noah’s Ark with the goal of opening it as a Christian theme park.

To be honest, I couldn’t confirm that this is the absolute largest timber-framed building in the world, but the AIG organization is vehemently claiming it is. In any case the thing is certainly huge, stretching some 510 feet in length. Take a look at the size of these tenons:

Here’s a flyover and partial fly-through of the nearly-completed construction:

The attraction will be called Ark Encounter and is due to open this July. Things may or may not go smoothly, as the organization is currently drawing fire: They’ve announced that they will only hire Christians to staff the park, a policy that seems to flout anti-discrimination hiring laws. We won’t touch that with a ten-foot pole, since we have no interest in getting into a religious debate.

We are, however, very interested in why unicorns didn’t manage to book passage on the fabled Ark. Religious officials and biblical experts have not provided compelling explanations, so following Core77’s tradition of excellence in journalism, we have conducted our own research into the matter. Below are the results of our investigation, providing two plausible theories:


Core77

World’s Largest Railway Model Is Now On Google “Mini” Street View

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Google’s Street View, that lets you explore the world through the virtual eyes of street level cameras, has now shrunk itself to the size of a thumb, so that you can experience the world’s largest miniature model railway as if it has been blown to real size.

h/t: amusingplanet

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Miniatur Wunderland” in Hamburg, Germany boasts of 13,000 kilometers of track and more than 200,000 tiny citizens, featuring tiny replicas of German provinces, famous places in the U.S. and even a fully-functioning airport, which itself is the largest miniature airport in the world.

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To capture the nooks and crannies in Miniatur Wunderland, Google mounted tiny cameras on top of tiny vehicles that were driven through the roads and over the train tracks, “weaving through the Wunderland’s little worlds to capture their hidden treasures,” wrote Sven Tresp, Street View Program Manager, in the official announcement.

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Google Maps’ miniature Street View devices cruising the railways and streets of Miniatur Wunderland:

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

The Battle For The Largest Bonfire In The Netherlands

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In the last few days of the year leading up to the midnight of December 31, two Dutch teams from the neighboring districts of Scheveningen (in Noorderstrand) and Duindorp (in Zuiderstrand) battle each other on Scheveningen’s North Beach for the title of “the largest bonfire in the Netherlands”. The long tradition and a matter of pride keeps the emotions churning as enthusiastic participants stack wooden crates and pallets as high as they can. The battle is closely monitored not only from Scheveningen and Duindorp, but also in the rest of the Netherlands and beyond. Tourists come all the way from America, Germany, France and England to see the bonfires. Before the bonfires are lit on the midnight of December 31, there are usually performances by artists and fireworks display.

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Photo credit: reddit

The tradition of lighting bonfires to celebrate important events goes back by at least a few centuries. In Scheveningen, the first bonfire after Christmas were probably lit around 1850. After World War II, The Hague became the center of New Year celebration. At that time, groups of young people would go out hunting for Christmas trees and would put a match to it. Fights between rival gangs often resulted in injuries.

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Photo credit: Arjen Toet

The police tried to keep the situation under control by designating six congregation places where bonfires could be lit. But the crowd continued to be as unruly as ever, dumping everything that’s combustible on the fire —Christmas trees, tires, and furniture. These unstable structures became a fire hazard. Besides drunk young men often caused trouble in the area, forcing the city police to restrict all bonfire lighting activities to the North Beach.

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Photo credit: Arjen Toet

The city proposed that they could build bonfires as big and high as they wanted as long as they keep the infighting among themselves civilized and organized and on the beach. They could only use wooden crates. No tire burning or Christmas tree burning was allowed. Most people felt the new rules were too strict and missed the thrill of hunting for Christmas trees in the neighborhoods and other things to burn. Some neighborhoods took part for a year or two and then quit. The only two groups that remained are Scheveningen and Duindorp. Now most neighborhoods who wishes to take part either side with Scheveningen or with Duindorp.

This year Duindorp won the battle again.

h/t: amusingplanet, vreugdevuur-scheveningen

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Photo credit: Maurits Verbiest

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Photo credit: Maurits Verbiest

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Photo credit: Maurits Verbiest

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Photo credit: Maurits Verbiest

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Photo credit: Arjen Toet

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Photo credit: Hollandse-Hoogte via ZUMA Press


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.