Tag Archives: language

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Video Interview With Unlicensed Action Figure Artist The Sucklord (NSFW Language)

Here’s a fascinating interview with The Sucklord, the NYC-based artist that cranks out modified and unlicensed action figures from his downtown studio. Whether it’s Gay Empire Homotroopers, and AT-AT that looks like it’s been through the South Bronx in the late ’70s or a Sleestak in a business suit, the Suckadelic brand is known for producing irreverent social commentary via toys that appear innocuous until you get up close.

The Sucklord, a/k/a/ Morgan Phillips, reveals that needing to pay the rent on his first studio is “what drove me to come up with a cheap way of doing mass production,” before revealing his moldmaking technique. He also talks about his trenchant philosophy on why “villains are just better:”


Core77

Video Interview With Unlicensed Action Figure Artist The Sucklord (NSFW Language)

Here’s a fascinating interview with The Sucklord, the NYC-based artist that cranks out modified and unlicensed action figures from his downtown studio. Whether it’s Gay Empire Homotroopers, and AT-AT that looks like it’s been through the South Bronx in the late ’70s or a Sleestak in a business suit, the Suckadelic brand is known for producing irreverent social commentary via toys that appear innocuous until you get up close.

The Sucklord, a/k/a/ Morgan Phillips, reveals that needing to pay the rent on his first studio is “what drove me to come up with a cheap way of doing mass production,” before revealing his moldmaking technique. He also talks about his trenchant philosophy on why “villains are just better:”


Core77

Colorful Lines, Inspired By The London Underground, Will Lead You To Classrooms At This Language School

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Architect Emil Dervish, has designed the Underhub language school, in Kiev, Ukraine. When designing the space, he was inspired by the London Underground, and wanted to re-create the atmosphere, with the use of bold colorful lines.

h/t: contemporist

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The rainbow colored lines on the floor, with names of London tube stations like, Westminster, Piccadilly, and Paddington, each lead you to the classroom. Once you get to the classroom, the line carries up onto the door, and once inside, the color of the room corresponds to the line you were following to get there. In each classroom, there is framed artwork that represents the name of the room.

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Traveller T-Shirt With 40 Icons Lets You Communicate In Any Country Even If You Don’t Speak Its Language

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George, Steven and Florian, are three friends that got together to create a t-shirt that makes it easier to communicate in a foreign language when you are traveling. It all started when one of the friends was traveling by motorbike in rural Vietnam, and their motorbike broke down.

h/t: boredpanda, contemporist, ufunk

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Later that night, over some beers, the idea was developed that there should be a way to have a set of symbols or icons that you could use to communicate with people when you don’t speak the language. After a few more beers, the idea of a t-shirt was born, that would have all of the essential symbols and icons on it, that you could wear and have available at any time.

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“Many times we were confronted with a language barrier that was only to be overcome by drawing signs, symbols or icons on a piece of paper, map, or into the dirt,” explain George, Steven and Florian to Bored Panda. “We thought it would be great to have an essential set of icons with you, permanently, so that you could just point on whatever you need – and people would understand. Soon the notepad was pulled out again and we started listing more or less essential icons that would have been of great help during not just ours, but basically anyone’s trip.”

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

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Electronic Arts Cuts Jobs At Montreal Studio Less Than Two Weeks After CEO’s Resignation

EA-Logo

Electronic Arts is laying off staffers at its Montreal office in another round of job cuts. The news comes less than two weeks after CEO John Riccitiello resigned, citing the company’s financial underperformance.

EA declined to tell Reuters how many jobs are being affected, but Joystiq reports that the layoffs will affect about 170 employees, out of a total of 300 employed at the studio. The Redwood City, California-based company said in a statement that the Montreal game studio is not closing and that”EA is sharpening its focus to provide games for new platforms and mobile. In some cases, this involves reducing team sizes as we evolve into a more efficient organization.”

EA has been restructuring its business to take advantage of new gaming platforms. Last year its PopCap unit laid off about 50 people in its North American office, after a year of hiring aggressively. At the time, PopCap cofounder John Vechey said the job cuts were part of a plan to focus more on free-to-play and mobile games, and denied speculation that EA was beyond the layoffs. (PopCap was acquired by EA for about $1.3 billion in 2011).

Despite those moves, EA, along with other game makers, has continued to struggle in the face of competition from free games offered on social networking or mobile platforms. When Riccitiello left the company last month, he cited its struggling financial performance: “My decision to leave EA is really all about my accountability for the shortcomings in our financial results this year. It currently looks like we will come in at the low end of, or slightly below, the financial guidance we issued to the Street, and we have fallen short of the internal operating plan we set one year ago. And for that, I am 100 percent accountable.” The company also recently earned the dubious distinction of a “Golden Poo,” awarded by Consumerist readers to the “Worst Company in America,” thanks to its botched SimCity release.

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Electronic Arts Cuts Jobs At Montreal Studio Less Than Two Weeks After CEO’s Resignation

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Twitter’s Music App Launch Reportedly Set For Friday, But Coachella Could Prove Too Chaotic For Marketing

twitter logo

Twitter Music will reportedly launch on Friday, reports AllThingsD citing sources familiar with the matter. Earlier today, music discovery service We Are Hunted confirmed that it had been acquired by Twitter, while Ryan Seacrest tweeted that he’d been playing around with Twitter’s new music app.

AllThingsD says that Twitter’s standalone music app will suggest tracks based on data gleaned from users’ accounts, including the accounts that they follow. The app will allow users to listen to music using third-party services like iTunes and Soundcloud, or watch music videos provided by Vevo.

Its acquisition of We Are Hunted and upcoming music app are the latest signs, along with Vine and its own photo filters, that Twitter is building itself out as an all-inclusive media platform. We’ve contacted Twitter for more information.

A launch this weekend would coincide with the massive Coachella Music Festival outside of Los Angeles, CA. The festival carries heavy sponsorships and in the past Facebook has shown off check-in kiosks and other technology companies have attempted product launches there.

Our writer Josh Constine has attended the last nine Coachellas and will be there this weekend. He’s not sure the launch of a music discovery app would work so well at the intense festival.

Constine explains “Twitter launching a music app at Coachella is risky. The festival is chaotic, there’s poor mobile signal, people try to conserve battery life, and there’s a ton of distraction. Amongst the seven stages and wild crowds of 75,000 attendees, it may be difficult to find time to download and use a music discovery app. There would be no way to hear new music or watch music videos with all the noise there. The festival could be useful for raising awareness of the app, and if it was more of a music moment capturing and sharing app similar to Soundtracking it could see use at Coachellla. But the festival is so overwhelming, inebriating, and exhausting that people might forget about Twitter music app posters seen between sets and might fail to download the app.”

We’ll be on the ground at Coachella tomorrow to let you know if Twitter tries anything.

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Twitter’s Music App Launch Reportedly Set For Friday, But Coachella Could Prove Too Chaotic For Marketing