Tag Archives: help

LeEco sells of land in Silicon Valley to help pay debts

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This $ 260 million injection of cash couldn’t come at a better time.

Continue reading LeEco sells of land in Silicon Valley to help pay debts

LeEco sells of land in Silicon Valley to help pay debts originally appeared on Autoblog on Sat, 18 Mar 2017 11:57:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog

The 2017 Design Salary Survey Is Officially Live, and We Need Your Help

2017 is officially in full swing! For some of you, that means you’re just starting up at your new job, and for others it means embarking on another year of a job you either love or hate. If you happen to fall into any of these categories, we need your help! Since 2001, Coroflot has collected and reported salary information from tens of thousands of design and creative professionals around the world. We’ve been able to do this with the help of our community, who we rely on to enter their own information. The Design Salary Guide is a valuable resource for your own salary negotiations or as a resource when building your team.

The Salary Guide offers plenty of benefits. For starters, it’s a rolling tool, available year-round and reporting the results in real-time. We have a pool of over 65,000, with useful data on dozens of job titles from around the world. Our range includes over 50 job titles, so there’s something for every creative role! All of the data is collected on a city level, allowing us to report results on a more granular, hyper-local scale (in addition to broader trends). You can even enter freelance hourly rates, and in turn we report on freelance hourly rates. We collect and report on salaries and hourly rates in local currencies around the world. Our charting tool shows the 25th percentile, median, and 75th percentile of earnings at all times. If we have enough data, we split it up into more detail. Any data you submit is completely anonymous, so there is zero risk in completing the survey.

Built by designers, for designers, Coroflot has always had a strong community of talented creative-types. We invite you to take a peek around and add your info to the Salary Guide. It literally takes less than 1 minute to participate. The more data we can collect and summarize, the better accuracy we’ll have. And of course, share it with your friends!

Keep your eyes peeled for Salary Guide news as we’ll have more exciting tidbits to share in the coming weeks.

Enter your data by March 14th to receive Coroflot’s annual report on design salaries.


Core77

Help crowdfund Motoroso, an automotive enthusiast project site

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Think of Motoroso a bit like Pinterest, but for car mods, projects, and inspiration.

Continue reading Help crowdfund Motoroso, an automotive enthusiast project site

Help crowdfund Motoroso, an automotive enthusiast project site originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 06 Jan 2017 17:21:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Reuse Your Empty Amazon Shipping Boxes to Help the Needy

If you haven’t yet recycled all of your Amazon boxes from this year’s gift-giving season, that’s a good thing. Because the online retailer has teamed up with Goodwill to create the Give Back Program, whereby you can get rid of some things you don’t need and donate them, with free shipping, to families and individuals that could use those items.

All you’ve gotta do is place your gently-used clothing, shoes or household items (no electronics) into an Amazon box, then go to the Give Back website to get a free shipping label. You can even arrange to have the box picked up at your house if you can’t make it down to the post office.


Core77

GM will help you lease a car to drive for Uber in San Francisco

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Want to drive for Uber, but don’t have a car? No problem.

Continue reading GM will help you lease a car to drive for Uber in San Francisco

GM will help you lease a car to drive for Uber in San Francisco originally appeared on Autoblog on Sat, 12 Nov 2016 12:26:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog

Smithsonian Calls Upon the Public to Help Preserve Dorothy’s Ruby Slippers

This week, the wonderful world of footwear has brought us us the opportunity to help Smithsonian preserve one of the most iconic pairs of shoes out there—Dorothy’s Ruby Slippers from The Wizard of Oz. The project’s Kickstarter is seeking a whopping $ 300,000, and with a little under one month to go, they’ve already raised over $ 190,000. 

The Ruby Slippers are a prime example of what can happen to historic artifacts after years of intense exposure to harsh light and the wrong environmental conditions—around 80 years in this case. The slippers were made in typical costume design style—quickly and cheaply. The production method benefited film production at the time but is hurting the preservation process now. Over the past 80 years, the slippers’ sequin, mesh and glass beading has become more sensitive and has faded in color. Smithsonian’s campaign features this chart outlining the slippers’ issues:

Image via Smithsonian.

Putting parts of our history on display for people around the world to see is important, but there’s a delicate balance when it comes to finding proper environmental and lighting conditions—it’s understandable that Smithsonian needs some extra cash money to learn more about specific materials. 

The non-profit organization is proposing a two-step materials and environment solution to the deteriorating shoes:

“We’re looking at the materials and the construction and finding a way to better preserve and conserve them for the future. We’ll construct a state of the art, environmentally controlled display case that will keep them sparkling far into the future.”

Museum conservator, Richard Barden, examining the slippers. Image via Smithsonian.

While Smithsonian admits they have no idea what the optimal condition settings for the shoes’ new display case are, here’s what they do know:

“We will need calibrated light exposure, as well as controlled humidity and temperature. Our conservators will work with scientists to study the slippers’ materials to determine the right conditions. The slippers will then undergo a conservation treatment to clean and stabilize them.”

I wish it were as simple as zapping the color back into the slippers

I’m curious to learn more about the display case’s features and how it will be able to protect the shoes from further light and climate related damage. Will it’s design be clearly function based or will it look similar to regular museum display cases? Either way, it’s very refreshing that a massive institution like Smithsonian is recognizing their lack of material preservation knowledge. 

 Let’s not forget, this isn’t Smithsonian’s first Kickstarter campaign—not very long ago, the non-profit organization started their Reboot the Suit campaign to conserve, digitize and display Neil Armstrong’s and Alan Shepard’s spacesuits. Hopefully Smithsonian’s research and crowd funding efforts will yield positive results for the whole museum community. Let’s hope their conservators can work as fast as they’re skyrocketing funding rates have.


Core77

A New Fire-to-Energy Device—But the UX May Need Some Help

BioLite’s BaseCamp

As far as we’re concerned, BioLite has got the best products on the market for turning firewood into energy. That’s why we gave their BaseCamp stove a Core77 Design Award last year. BioLite’s cooking stoves improve combustion efficiency, reduce smoke and generate electricity—a triple win.

Now a sort of would-be partial competitor has emerged, or is attempting to, on Kickstarter. Have a look at this JikoPower Spark device:

We can’t consider the Spark a true competitor to a BioLite stove, as the former is an add-on device and the latter provides a complete solution. It’s possible that they can compete on price: The Spark is going for $ 115 on Kickstarter and a BioLite CampStove goes for $ 130. The price difference is negligible in developed nations, but admittedly might prove a dealbreaker in developing nations where $ 15 is a lot harder to come by.

One additional advantage the Spark has is that it can be “retrofit” to any situation where there’s already fire. 

But in our eyes, the advantages stop there. The glaring drawback is that the Spark’s UX doesn’t look all that great. It obviously has to be placed quite close to the heat source, and propping it up on an uneven or elevated surface looks like a jury-rigged affair at best.

This seems precarious, and possibly even dangerous, to us.
I just don’t like the idea of placing a lever with a protruding handle under something that gets very hot.

Spark’s industrial design, we feel, has a long way to go. While the developers produced a series of iterative prototypes, the final product still doesn’t look quite finished to us. We don’t mean that in a design-snob aesthetic sense; we mean in a functional, practical sense. The flat bottom and overall form just don’t seem like the best solution for being placed near a variety of heat sources. 

Contrast that with the UX for any of BioLite’s stoves, where ease-of-use is paramount.

BioLite’s CampStove

What do you think? Can a better design for the Spark make it a worthy competitor to BioLite, or do you think BioLite’s “whole package” design approach and well-thought-out UX means they’ve got the market stitched up?


Core77

A New Fire-to-Energy Device—But the UX May Need Some Help

BioLite’s BaseCamp

As far as we’re concerned, BioLite has got the best products on the market for turning firewood into energy. That’s why we gave their BaseCamp stove a Core77 Design Award last year. BioLite’s cooking stoves improve combustion efficiency, reduce smoke and generate electricity—a triple win.

Now a sort of would-be partial competitor has emerged, or is attempting to, on Kickstarter. Have a look at this JikoPower Spark device:

We can’t consider the Spark a true competitor to a BioLite stove, as the former is an add-on device and the latter provides a complete solution. It’s possible that they can compete on price: The Spark is going for $ 115 on Kickstarter and a BioLite CampStove goes for $ 130. The price difference is negligible in developed nations, but admittedly might prove a dealbreaker in developing nations where $ 15 is a lot harder to come by.

One additional advantage the Spark has is that it can be “retrofit” to any situation where there’s already fire. 

But in our eyes, the advantages stop there. The glaring drawback is that the Spark’s UX doesn’t look all that great. It obviously has to be placed quite close to the heat source, and propping it up on an uneven or elevated surface looks like a jury-rigged affair at best.

This seems precarious, and possibly even dangerous, to us.
I just don’t like the idea of placing a lever with a protruding handle under something that gets very hot.

Spark’s industrial design, we feel, has a long way to go. While the developers produced a series of iterative prototypes, the final product still doesn’t look quite finished to us. We don’t mean that in a design-snob aesthetic sense; we mean in a functional, practical sense. The flat bottom and overall form just don’t seem like the best solution for being placed near a variety of heat sources. 

Contrast that with the UX for any of BioLite’s stoves, where ease-of-use is paramount.

BioLite’s CampStove

What do you think? Can a better design for the Spark make it a worthy competitor to BioLite, or do you think BioLite’s “whole package” design approach and well-thought-out UX means they’ve got the market stitched up?


Core77

Design Job: Help Products Like the Fidget Cube Rise to Fame Through UX as Kickstarter’s Product Designer in Brooklyn, NY 

We’re seeking a top-notch product designer to work on beautiful and functional tools to help our community create, discover, explore, back, and share creative projects. You’ll collaborate with teams across Kickstarter to solve new problems, ensure a consistent user experience, and push the needle forward for creativity so Kickstarter is always engaging and inspiring.

View the full design job here
Core77

Assisted Living Facility Creates Mock Town To Help Residents With Alzheimer’s

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Check this out: after a user on Reddit posted a photo of an assisted living facility “designed to look like a golf course community,” the internet ate it up.

h/t: the-daily.buzz. All photos courtesy of Lantern.

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The facility is Lantern of Chagrin Valley in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. It is one of three facilities designed specifically to improve the quality of life for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients. The hallways are carpeted green to look like grass. The interior courtyards and corridors have been built to resemble houses with front porches overlooking a golf course. A sound system plays the sounds of birds chirping. Fiber optics in a “sky ceiling” mimic daytime and nighttime. Those who suffer from Alzheimer’s tend to retain memories from their younger years, so the facility serves as a time capsule for these seniors, many of whom grew up during the 1930s and 1940s.

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Lantern’s design concept is part of a program provided by Svayus. Lantern CEO and occupational therapist, Jean Makesh, developed the program in 2007, but did not get investors on board until 2010. They encouraged him, he says, “to take a risk.”

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Makesh says that controlled environments reduce incidences of anger, irritation and depression in dementia patients: “Every little thing you see, the wall color, the paint, actually has a therapeutic benefit, a therapeutic value.”

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According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 5 million Americans lived with Alzheimer’s Disease in 2013. The number is expected to grow nearly three times this amount by 2050.

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Assisted Living Facility Creates Mock Town To Help Residents With Alzheimer’s

1

Check this out: after a user on Reddit posted a photo of an assisted living facility “designed to look like a golf course community,” the internet ate it up.

h/t: the-daily.buzz. All photos courtesy of Lantern.

2

The facility is Lantern of Chagrin Valley in Chagrin Falls, Ohio. It is one of three facilities designed specifically to improve the quality of life for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients. The hallways are carpeted green to look like grass. The interior courtyards and corridors have been built to resemble houses with front porches overlooking a golf course. A sound system plays the sounds of birds chirping. Fiber optics in a “sky ceiling” mimic daytime and nighttime. Those who suffer from Alzheimer’s tend to retain memories from their younger years, so the facility serves as a time capsule for these seniors, many of whom grew up during the 1930s and 1940s.

3

Lantern’s design concept is part of a program provided by Svayus. Lantern CEO and occupational therapist, Jean Makesh, developed the program in 2007, but did not get investors on board until 2010. They encouraged him, he says, “to take a risk.”

4

Makesh says that controlled environments reduce incidences of anger, irritation and depression in dementia patients: “Every little thing you see, the wall color, the paint, actually has a therapeutic benefit, a therapeutic value.”

5

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 5 million Americans lived with Alzheimer’s Disease in 2013. The number is expected to grow nearly three times this amount by 2050.

6


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Design Job: Got the Travel Bug? Help Students See The World as EF Tour’s Graphic Designer in Cambridge, MA

Go Ahead Tours is looking for a Designer to join our team, working at our Boston headquarters. Reporting to the Art Director, you’ll be an integral part of our creative team. You’ll work closely with writers, other designers and business stakeholders to create a holistic experience for a direct to consumer brand.

View the full design job here
Core77

Espresa wants to help companies pamper their employees

Espresa The range of benefits that Silicon Valley companies offer employees may vary from dental, vision and 401(k) all the way to yoga massages, car washes and beauty services. With tech giants like Facebook and Google making a big deal about the benefits they offer, delivering and managing perks is a key part of any company’s strategy to attract talent now — and this is… Read More


TechCrunch

This Floating Hackerspace Could Help Heal The Environment

This May, Andrew Quitmeyer helped build an art and science incubator… that floats. The Waterspace project is a mini laboratory intended to draw local resources and attention together around ecological interests and issues in the small community near Dumaguete, Philippines. The chosen location is near an endangered coral reef, and the floating “BOAT lab” (named for Building Open Art & Technology) works to gather and share information about the reef and the community.

The area is subject to many problems related to pollution and poor water treatment, which are in turn caused by an array of locally specific causes. The floating project supported many types of creative troubleshooting around improving ecological stability and building public awareness.

This barge-bound makerspace was built in just 9 days using reclaimed bamboo and traditional boat building methods. It is equipped with solar power, work areas, performance areas, and lab equipment. These elements all combined to encourage local interaction with, protection of, and invention around the surrounding environment.

Over the course of the month, teams worked on a number of issues and goals. Some BOAT Lab highlights include a TV projection “screen” made from a curtain of dripping seawater, a submersible video drone, educational performances, and weather and water testing systems that gather data on the health of the local ecosystem.

Check out the Instructables how-to if you want to know how to make your own floating barge, public lab, aquatic educational center, mobile performance platform, or eco-minded bootleg moonshine shack. 

You can find a free book on the Waterspace project and process here


Core77

Thinner Beauty Is Using Photoshop To “Help” Plus-Size Women Lose Weight

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Thinner Beauty endeavors to “help” plus-size women lose weight. It does this by offering Photoshopped images of what they could look like if they were thinner.

h/t: mic

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“We do this [encourage them] by showing how much more beautiful they could be if they made the difficult, lifelong commitment to a regimen of personal fitness,” reads a banner on the group’s subreddit.

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The Thinner Beauty website features a gallery of “before and after” photos: Plus-size women’s bodies are dramatically manipulated to take on very different shapes

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Magazine Storage: 12 Tables and Stools That Can Help Organize Publications

While coffee tables can be designed to store all kinds of things, some coffee tables—along with side tables and stools—are designed specifically to hold magazines. 

Rform’s Pi collection has both a bench and a stool/side table with space for magazines. This is easy-to-reach storage for those who have trouble bending down toward the floor, where some other tables have their storage space. The one drawback I can see is that magazines might get shoved toward the back where they would be harder to see (and retrieve).

Umbra’s Magino stool, designed by Karim Rashid, has that close-to-the-floor storage space: fine for many people, but not those with trouble bending down that low. Because it’s clear acrylic, the top magazine on each side is visible; that’s nice for those who work best with storage that doesn’t hide things away.

The Collecteur from Christian Lessing, with its two powder coated steel pieces, has an adjustable height, going from 40 to 59 cm. The Collecteur has a removable cushion, so it can serve as a stool or an end table. One downside: As the stack of magazines grows, it might become increasingly hard for end users to pull out the ones they want. And thinner magazines without a spine won’t work very well in this type of piece.

The Woodieful Chair, which also serves as an end table, had a successful Kickstarter that got funded in May. The slots provide for magazine storage when it’s oriented as a table. 

The Woodieful can also store magazines when it’s being used as a chair. However, this piece would be a bit cumbersome to use for magazines if it was frequently re-oriented—changing between a chair and a table—as the magazines would need to be removed and replaced.

Tables designed to hold magazines often use slots in the top surface for this purpose. The acrylic Wave Table, a prototype from BEdesign, provides this type of storage. However, the very limited tabletop space would make this impractical for many people.

But the Wave Table has one notable feature: It can be turned on end, and seemingly still provide storage (on what would then be the side, not the top).

The Mag coffee table from Ali Sandifer provides a lot of tabletop space along with nice angled storage for a limited number of magazines. The angled approach helps keep magazines upright even if the storage space isn’t full.

The coffee table from Brigada would work for end users willing to trade some tabletop space for more magazine storage. The slots have varying depths, which would be nice for those whose periodicals aren’t a single size. But for others, the deepest slots may be a bit too deep for comfort.

Lots of freestanding magazine racks use a leather sling; Roderick Vos takes this design approach and incorporates it into a table. This design will annoy some end users because the magazines will not stand up straight and may tend to curl; others won’t mind that at all.

Another design approach involves using a rack that the magazines get placed over, as with the WF Magazine Side Table from Joshua Howe. End users who are in the midst of reading a magazine could keep their places, which some may appreciate. However, this design may be a bit hard on the magazine’s spine—a possible concern for those who intend to keep the magazines after they’ve been read.

The magazine coffee table from Kimba Hills would be good for end users who are very visual and want to readily see the magazines being stored.

The Paper Table from Ligne Roset, designed by Nathan Yong, is marketed as a magazine rack/occasional table, but it doesn’t look like a very practical table. It’s also less space-efficient with its storage than some other approaches, but it is another design that would work well for those who work best when they have everything within easy eyesight.

Levenger’s No-Room-for-a-Table Table uses the accompanying large basket to provide magazine storage that fits into narrow spaces. However, if there’s no space for end users to stand beside the table (so they can only access it from the front), it will be hard for them to see what’s in that basket; they’d have to pull it forward.


Core77

Design Job: How Can Core77 Help? Join the Team as a Client Support Specialist in Stamford, CT

Core77 is a publishing business operating a network of web sites focused on the creative industries (including Coroflot.com!). We are currently seeking an energetic, self-starting Client Support specialist to work in our office as the primary interface to our clients. This person must communicate extensively and clearly with our audience

View the full design job here
Core77

Design Job: Help Build a Better World as a Sr. Industrial Designer at Gensler in Chicago 

At Gensler, we design for people. We leverage our global perspective and local presence to innovate at every scale. We’re not just designers. We’re tinkerers, craftspeople, visionaries, innovators and thought leaders. Fueled by passion and entrepreneurial spirit, our people bring new ideas to solve challenging problems. Whether you’re into

View the full design job here
Core77