Tag Archives: Going

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

If You’re Going to Build Your Own Moxon Vise, Watch This First

We’ve heard the story of how the Moxon vise was resurrected by Christopher Schwarz; seen a modern-day version created by Benchcrafted; and watched David Barron hack his for greater efficiency.

In this video, engineer Paul Marcel shows you how to actually build one from the Benchcrafted kit. And not only that, he shows you why he deviates from the assembly instructions to introduce more functionality, and reveals a couple of clever modifications and a jig he’s made to speed his workflow.

Because this video is long, we’ve cued it up into sections for you, so you can skip to the parts you’re interested in:

Introducing the Vise

[40 seconds long]

The Original Design’s Intended Usage

[1 minute long]

Revealing the Benchcrafted Kit’s Contents

[2 minutes long]

Building the Vise: Materials You’ll Need

[47 seconds long]

The Actual Build 

(with Paul Marcel’s modifications)

[7 minutes long]

Demonstrating its Basic Use

[2.5 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 1

(Why he made it assymetrical with the extra long right side)

[50 seconds long]

Demonstrating a Clever Jig

[2 minutes long]

Demonstration of Modification 2

(Why he cut V-grooves into the chops)

[1 minute long]

A Closing Joke

[30 seconds long]

As with the David Barron modifications, I’m digging Paul Marcel’s industrial-designer-like careful consideration of how he will actually use the vise and designing for that specifically. And little details, like the way he thinks ahead and future-proofs it with the extra mortise in the chops.

Lastly, please note that this video was made several years ago, when Benchcrafted was still selling the kit with suede rather than Crubber.


Core77

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

Superbike-inspired Nike Air Jordan IV Motorsport sneakers going back into production

Filed under: ,,

The shoes were sold to commemorate the team’s fourth anniversary.

Continue reading Superbike-inspired Nike Air Jordan IV Motorsport sneakers going back into production

Superbike-inspired Nike Air Jordan IV Motorsport sneakers going back into production originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 22 Mar 2017 17:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink |  Email this |  Comments
Autoblog

Here’s why Apple probably isn’t going to buy Lit Motors

Filed under: ,,,,,

Get your salt shakers ready, because we’ve got another Apple car rumor today.

Continue reading Here’s why Apple probably isn’t going to buy Lit Motors

Here’s why Apple probably isn’t going to buy Lit Motors originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 21 Sep 2016 18:40:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink |  Email this |  Comments
Autoblog

People Are Going Crazy For This $8 “Raindrop Cake” Made Of Water

3

When Darren Wong, the genius behind bringing Raindrop Cake to life in the US and I first met about shooting Raindrop Cake, my immediate thought was how to approach an object that can be translucent, opaque and completely transparent depending on lighting and angle and how to really get across the texture in images. Also intriguing was that at angles where Raindrop Cake is translucent, it is essentially a lens, magnifying whatever it is underneath it.

h/t: pulptastic, buzzfeed, huffingtonpost, irelandstudios

This is “raindrop cake”, created by New Yorker Darren Wong:

1

It’s made from mineral water and agar (a gelatin-like substance made from, er, algae) and flavored with brown sugar syrup and roasted soybean flour.

5

No, we have no idea what roasted soybean flour tastes like, either. Although it looks like a perfect droplet of water waiting to be popped, the raindrop cake actually cuts more like firm Jell-O.

anigif_optimized-25185-1459540706-11

Creator Darren said,

“It kind of reminds me of that scene from A Bug’s Life where they drunk water drops off of leaves.”

4

“There are very few foods that engage this many senses at the same time, which is what attracted me to this dessert in the first place.”

6

“They looked like a really cool and fun food experience. When I discovered you couldn’t get them in the US, I went to work in making it myself.”

2

“The hardest part was trying to figure out how to store and transport something so fragile,” says Darren.

7

But they found a way to package and serve raindrop cake that has brought delight to Instagrammers, with oddly satisfying videos like this appearing everywhere.

But what does it actually taste like (if a water-and-algae-cake can taste of anything at all)? Well, this Instagrammer claims to have queued for 30 minutes for “giant flavorless gelatinous dew drops”.

#raindropcake #tattoos #dessert

A photo posted by @raindropcake on

💧#raindropitlikeitshot #raindropcake #smorgasburg #definitelycake

A photo posted by @raindropcake on


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