Tag Archives: glass

Milan Design Week 2017: Best in Glass

Just over a century ago, Paul Scheerbart noted that “the new glass environment will completely transform mankind, and it remains only to wish that the new glass culture will not find too many opponents.” Captivated by Bruno Taut’s 1914 glass pavilion, the writer painted a utopian picture of a crystalline future, equally panoramic and kaleidoscopic, all thanks to the transparent building material. Suffice it to say that he would have been chagrined to learn that visitors to, say, Massimiliano Fuksas’ formidable Fieramilano spend more time in its hangar-like exhibition halls than they do admiring its soaring glass canopy (ditto I.M. Pei’s ziggurat-like Javits Center).

Architectural applications aside, “glass culture” continues to thrive at the scale of product design and craft. From a breakthrough in 3D-printed glass to a collection of pieces from weekend workshop in Portugal, here are a few noteworthy new glass projects from Milan this year.

The Mediated Matter Group – “Ancient Yet Modern”

Led by Neri Oxman, this research group at MIT’s Media Lab first published its findings in optically transparent 3D-printed glass back in 2015. Now, with G3DP2, the whiz-kids have scaled the technology up, from product scale to that of architecture. To show off their latest efforts, the Mediated Matter Group installed “Ancient Yet Modern,” a series of three freestanding columns embedded with synapse-light pulsing lights, at the Triennale di Milano.

Project Team: Chikara Inamura (project lead), Michael Stern, Daniel Lizardo, Tal Achituv, Tomer Weller, Owen Trueblood, Nassia Inglessis, Giorgia Franchin, Kelly Donovan, Peter Houk (project adviser), Prof. Neri Oxman (project and group director).

Project Associates: Andrea Magdanz, Susan Shapiro, David J. Benyosef, Mary Ann Babula, Forrest Whitcher, Robert Philips, Neils La White, Paula Aguilera, Jonathan Williams, Andy Ryan, Jeremy Flower.

Off Portugal presents Glass Cares

On the other end of the proverbial spectrum, OFF Portugal took the time-honored tack of gathering designers for a weekend workshop — in this case, glass-blowing in Marinha Grande. Two days in the making as opposed to two years, the resulting ten pieces offer a nice capsule collection of Portuguese design today as young designers look to move beyond the nation’s ready association with cork. The glass workshop 

The glass workshop and exhibition in Ventura Lambrate marks the debut of OFF Portugal, a joint effort between Vicara, Arquivo 237, and Cencal; future initiatives will explore other craft and manufacturing techniques.

Participating designers: Diana Medina, Eneida Lombe Tavares, Luis Nascimento, studio ojoaoeamaria, Jorge Carreira, Paulo Sellmayer, Samuel Reis, Vitor Agostinho, Manuel Amaral Netto, and Joana Silva

Salviati presents Decode/Recode

Speaking of long traditions, Venice-based Salviati is among the world’s oldest glass factories, dating back to 1859. For this year’s Milan design week, the Murano specialists presented a pair of installations at the newly minted Ventura Centrale district, a series of cavernous makeshift galleries underneath the train tracks. For Decode/Recode, Salviati invited Luca Nichetto and Ben Gorham to create modular works of glass, “Pyrae” and “Strata.”

Having long collaborated with his fellow Venetians — Salviati produced his first piece — Nichetto developed 25 modules that are combined in different configurations to create the 53 totem-pole-like figures, each illuminated from within. Meanwhile, Gorham, a perfumer by profession, opted for luminous towers to showcase glass tiles in various textures and finishes.

Spektacularis at Matter and Muse

An entirely unexpected joint effort between Filipino industrial designers and Czech master glassblowers, Spektacularis was one of three exhibitors in Matter and Muse, which occupied a modest gallery at the Palazzo Litta. The mutual unfamiliarity yielded expected results, hybrid objets d’art that incorporate elements of both cultures.

Participating designers: Stanley Ruiz, Liliana Manahan, Gabriel Lichauco, Jiri Panicek

“Prism” collection by Tomás Alonso

Atelier Swarovski Home at Palazzo Crespi

The Austrian crystal producer unveiled its latest home decor collections, developed by designers such as 2016 Swarovski Designer of the Future winners Studio Brynjar & Veronika and Tomás Alonso, who extended his collection. Scintillating though the wares may be, the gilded setting stole the show.

“Prism” collection by Tomás Alonso
“Prism” collection by Tomás Alonso
“Currents” collection by Studio Brynjar & Veronika

Other new Swarovski Home collections (not pictured) were designed by Aldo Bakker, Barbara Barry, Andre Kikoski, and Greg Lynn.

Roll & Hill launched Ladies & Gentlemen Studio‘s new “Kazimir” chandelier at Euroluce. Art/design history buffs can probably guess which Suprematist painter inspired the Brooklyn-based duo.

Also noteworthy

Naturally, this is just a selection of works in glass from design week in Milan; here are a few others that also caught our eye at the Salone and beyond. 

The New York-based lighting company also debuted the “Coax” collection by John Hogan
Meanwhile, at SaloneSatellite, Berlin’s Mendelheit Design Lab showed a mix of products, including several glass pieces. Created in a mold made from up to 128 different blocks, the “Tombola” generative vase can take countless forms.
Germans Ermics exhibited three ombre pieces at Rossana Orlandi; the chair, in particular, is an homage to Shiro Kuramata (forgive the awkward photo and check out more on his website)


Core77

John Goodenough develops rapid-charge battery made of glass

Filed under: ,,,

Is this the solution for charging electric vehicle batteries quickly and safely?

Continue reading John Goodenough develops rapid-charge battery made of glass

John Goodenough develops rapid-charge battery made of glass originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 15 Mar 2017 09:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink |  Email this |  Comments
Autoblog

Hand Over Your DNA, Receive Custom Beer Glass

Are you one of those people that tastes every single beer offered at the bar before ordering? Do you make sure to hit every local brewery within a 20 mile radius while on vacation? Here’s a real test of your beer loyalty—would you or someone you know go this far?

Hailing from Japan, DNA GLASS is a project dedicated to both beer lovers and those who aren’t quite sold on the popular beverage. Apparently, by simply mailing in a saliva sample, the design team can understand your taste profile and 3D print a custom beer glass to help you enjoy—or learn to enjoy—a nice cold one to your fullest potential.

The team—including creative directors from Japanese beverage company Suntory—has created an algorithm that analyzes DNA based on beer related principles like alcohol tolerance and sensitivity to the bitterness of hops as well as personality traits. Each principle affects a certain part of the glass’ shape: 

After the subject’s DNA is analyzed, the results are sent over to product designer Yoh Komiyama to design and 3D print their customized glass. They’ve already tested the algorithm and business model on 10 test subjects—here’s an example:

His hair is cool
but apparently his DNA is even more cool
because it yields this shape

The concept of customized products based on genetic build up is one that looks toward the future of digital fabrication, but it does raise some concerns. How would you ensure the company collecting your DNA is only using it to customize a sick beer glass for you? If you want to give this as a gift to a beer loving friend, how would you collect their saliva without getting weird? Overall, this concept is still a bit sketchy, but it’s headed in an exciting direction. 


Core77

The Tesla Model S and Model X P90D are gone, but there’s a new glass roof

Filed under: ,,,,

It’s more of an upgrade than a goodbye.

Continue reading The Tesla Model S and Model X P90D are gone, but there’s a new glass roof

The Tesla Model S and Model X P90D are gone, but there’s a new glass roof originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 04 Nov 2016 17:26:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink |  Email this |  Comments
Autoblog

Harvard’s Collection of Glass Flowers 

It’s been a bit of an ugly news cycle this week. Let’s look at some gorgeous works of craft and science, shall we? If you don’t frequent Boston museums or Ivy League special collections you might not have heard of the Harvard Glass Flowers, but you should. 

Harvard University’s Museum of Natural History has an enormous collection of glass flowers and plants, which reopened earlier this year after a good deal of diligent and difficult restoration work. The collection is comprised of hyper realistic scientific models of plants, flowers, roots, seeds, and more, all made by hand over 100 years ago. 

The flowers were created by Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka, a German father and son team with family roots in fine jewelry and glasswork as far back as the fifteenth century. The botanical works were commissioned in 1886 by George Lincoln Goodale, the first director of Harvard’s Botanical Museum, in order to aid study of the burgeoning field. 

In an era of booming discovery and taxonomy, and before affordable photography, most botanically inclined students and scientists didn’t have access to accurate drawings or models of plants outside their own region. And the Northeast winter is particularly unfriendly to fragile specimens. In glass form, exotic discoveries and delicate inner workings were preserved in lifelike detail that papier mâché models couldn’t hope to copy. 

Perhaps surprisingly, the Blaschkas used lampworking (or ‘flameworking’) glass techniques that have barely changed in the 130 years since. Just pigmented glass rods, powdered colors, some tongs and tweezers, and a very hot flame. These stunningly realistic botanical models were created with tools nearly identical to the ones behind your college roommate’s collection of “art” bongs. 

This level of craft mastery and representation was less rare in an era without instantaneous access to nuanced visual references and information. But even now, with technologically assisted production and an amount of reference material unfathomable to human brains, the craftsmanship involved is special. The textures, colors and minute attention to detail are incredible. 

Before embarking on this heap of delicate flowers, the Blaschkas gained renown for their work on glass eyes and equally impressive models of fish and invertibrate sea creatures. They eventually caught the eye of Prince Camil de Rohan, currently ruling over part of Bohemia, and through his patronage they gained access to his incredibly stocked greenouses. The father and son’s scientific replicas of the exotic royal plants were displayed as art by the nobility, and their fame crossed the ocean to Harvard.

Supported by former student Mary Lee Ware and her mother Mrs. Elizabeth C. Ware, Harvard’s Botanical Museum director opened a commission with the Blaschkas. Over the course of the next several decades, that commissioned project would eventually grow to include around 3,000 models of 847 species. 

The Wares donated the collection to the Botanical Museum in memory of Dr. Charles Eliot Ware, and it has remained an enormous attraction ever since. 

This spring it reopened after meticulous restoration and re-design of the permanent exhibit. Here’s a bit on the BTS work that the curatorial and restoration teams had in front of them with this extra delicate collection.


Core77

Magnifying Glass from Scratch, a Leatherbound Notebook & Pencil Case, a Brass Testicle Holder, Fixing Your Earlier Designs and More

Kitchen Drawer Organizer

I like what Steve Ramsey does here, which is demonstrate that a lot of times, your first and second design for something will not stand the test of time. Here he revisits a project he’s already done several times, a kitchen drawer organizer, and attempts to correct the errors of versions 1.0 and 2.0 with a new design:

Brass Magnifying Glass

This is one of those videos where you think, “For chrissakes, is there anything Jimmy DiResta can’t make?” This time ’round he finds an old magnifying lens, then crafts a beautiful brass handle and an encirclement to hold it in place. As always, half the fun is trying to figure out what each operation he’s doing will lead to:

Brass Testicle Holders

Yes, you read that right. You’ve gotta love any project that Frank Howarth prefaces with a warning that it involves a portion of the male anatomy. Asked to create a series of bases to hold an unusual commemorative item for a graduating class of urologists, Howarth proves he’s got the balls to tackle the project:

Homemade Kant Clamps

Izzy Swan likes Kant-twist clamps—you know, the little guy that inches across the screen at the end of every Frank Howarth video—and designs a burly DIY set for his own use:

Children’s Wagon

This week, Matthias Wandel builds a vehicle—well, a child’s wagon—for the newest member of the Wandel family:

Board-on-Board Cedar Fence

April Wilkerson’s no joke: It’s 104 degrees in Texas, and with everyone inside enjoying air conditioning, she’s outside working a welding rig and a chainsaw to kick off a large fencing project:

Outdoor Sink

This week, Bob Clagett tackles woodworking, metalworking and sewing to create this outdoor sink for the family home. One of the things I really dig about Clagett’s videos is that he always takes the time at the end to tell you what he learned, i.e. what he would’ve done differently if repeating the project.

Paulk Workbench by FastCap

We once interviewed Ron Paulk on the design of his innovative workbench, which he was selling plans for online. Now a ready-to-assemble iteration of the bench is going into production by FastCap, and Paulk is asking viewers: “How much should I charge for it?”

Pull-Out Storage Cabinet

Faced with an inconvenient, apparently unusable corner portion of a built-in, Sandra Powell figures out how to wring some usable and convenient storage out of it with this pull-out cabinet:

Leatherbound Notebook and Pencil Case

I love that Linn from Darbin Orvar, like DiResta, Clagett and Kampf, has a willingness to tackle any material rather than just staying in her comfort zone. Lately she’s expanded into leatherwork, and this week she makes her own “everyday carry” items—a leatherbound notebook and a wood-and-leather pencil case with a magnetic closure:

Screen Print Lights

This week, Laura Kampf builds two unconventional lamps, creating the structures out of wood and fronts each with an old screen print:


Core77

Magnifying Glass from Scratch, a Leatherbound Notebook & Pencil Case, a Brass Testicle Holder, Fixing Your Earlier Designs and More

Kitchen Drawer Organizer

I like what Steve Ramsey does here, which is demonstrate that a lot of times, your first and second design for something will not stand the test of time. Here he revisits a project he’s already done several times, a kitchen drawer organizer, and attempts to correct the errors of versions 1.0 and 2.0 with a new design:

Brass Magnifying Glass

This is one of those videos where you think, “For chrissakes, is there anything Jimmy DiResta can’t make?” This time ’round he finds an old magnifying lens, then crafts a beautiful brass handle and an encirclement to hold it in place. As always, half the fun is trying to figure out what each operation he’s doing will lead to:

Brass Testicle Holders

Yes, you read that right. You’ve gotta love any project that Frank Howarth prefaces with a warning that it involves a portion of the male anatomy. Asked to create a series of bases to hold an unusual commemorative item for a graduating class of urologists, Howarth proves he’s got the balls to tackle the project:

Homemade Kant Clamps

Izzy Swan likes Kant-twist clamps—you know, the little guy that inches across the screen at the end of every Frank Howarth video—and designs a burly DIY set for his own use:

Children’s Wagon

This week, Matthias Wandel builds a vehicle—well, a child’s wagon—for the newest member of the Wandel family:

Board-on-Board Cedar Fence

April Wilkerson’s no joke: It’s 104 degrees in Texas, and with everyone inside enjoying air conditioning, she’s outside working a welding rig and a chainsaw to kick off a large fencing project:

Outdoor Sink

This week, Bob Clagett tackles woodworking, metalworking and sewing to create this outdoor sink for the family home. One of the things I really dig about Clagett’s videos is that he always takes the time at the end to tell you what he learned, i.e. what he would’ve done differently if repeating the project.

Paulk Workbench by FastCap

We once interviewed Ron Paulk on the design of his innovative workbench, which he was selling plans for online. Now a ready-to-assemble iteration of the bench is going into production by FastCap, and Paulk is asking viewers: “How much should I charge for it?”

Pull-Out Storage Cabinet

Faced with an inconvenient, apparently unusable corner portion of a built-in, Sandra Powell figures out how to wring some usable and convenient storage out of it with this pull-out cabinet:

Leatherbound Notebook and Pencil Case

I love that Linn from Darbin Orvar, like DiResta, Clagett and Kampf, has a willingness to tackle any material rather than just staying in her comfort zone. Lately she’s expanded into leatherwork, and this week she makes her own “everyday carry” items—a leatherbound notebook and a wood-and-leather pencil case with a magnetic closure:

Screen Print Lights

This week, Laura Kampf builds two unconventional lamps, creating the structures out of wood and fronts each with an old screen print:


Core77

Magnifying Glass from Scratch, a Leatherbound Notebook & Pencil Case, a Brass Testicle Holder, Fixing Your Earlier Designs and More

Kitchen Drawer Organizer

I like what Steve Ramsey does here, which is demonstrate that a lot of times, your first and second design for something will not stand the test of time. Here he revisits a project he’s already done several times, a kitchen drawer organizer, and attempts to correct the errors of versions 1.0 and 2.0 with a new design:

Brass Magnifying Glass

This is one of those videos where you think, “For chrissakes, is there anything Jimmy DiResta can’t make?” This time ’round he finds an old magnifying lens, then crafts a beautiful brass handle and an encirclement to hold it in place. As always, half the fun is trying to figure out what each operation he’s doing will lead to:

Brass Testicle Holders

Yes, you read that right. You’ve gotta love any project that Frank Howarth prefaces with a warning that it involves a portion of the male anatomy. Asked to create a series of bases to hold an unusual commemorative item for a graduating class of urologists, Howarth proves he’s got the balls to tackle the project:

Homemade Kant Clamps

Izzy Swan likes Kant-twist clamps—you know, the little guy that inches across the screen at the end of every Frank Howarth video—and designs a burly DIY set for his own use:

Children’s Wagon

This week, Matthias Wandel builds a vehicle—well, a child’s wagon—for the newest member of the Wandel family:

Board-on-Board Cedar Fence

April Wilkerson’s no joke: It’s 104 degrees in Texas, and with everyone inside enjoying air conditioning, she’s outside working a welding rig and a chainsaw to kick off a large fencing project:

Outdoor Sink

This week, Bob Clagett tackles woodworking, metalworking and sewing to create this outdoor sink for the family home. One of the things I really dig about Clagett’s videos is that he always takes the time at the end to tell you what he learned, i.e. what he would’ve done differently if repeating the project.

Paulk Workbench by FastCap

We once interviewed Ron Paulk on the design of his innovative workbench, which he was selling plans for online. Now a ready-to-assemble iteration of the bench is going into production by FastCap, and Paulk is asking viewers: “How much should I charge for it?”

Pull-Out Storage Cabinet

Faced with an inconvenient, apparently unusable corner portion of a built-in, Sandra Powell figures out how to wring some usable and convenient storage out of it with this pull-out cabinet:

Leatherbound Notebook and Pencil Case

I love that Linn from Darbin Orvar, like DiResta, Clagett and Kampf, has a willingness to tackle any material rather than just staying in her comfort zone. Lately she’s expanded into leatherwork, and this week she makes her own “everyday carry” items—a leatherbound notebook and a wood-and-leather pencil case with a magnetic closure:

Screen Print Lights

This week, Laura Kampf builds two unconventional lamps, creating the structures out of wood and fronts each with an old screen print:


Core77

Magnifying Glass from Scratch, a Leatherbound Notebook & Pencil Case, a Brass Testicle Holder, Fixing Your Earlier Designs and More

Kitchen Drawer Organizer

I like what Steve Ramsey does here, which is demonstrate that a lot of times, your first and second design for something will not stand the test of time. Here he revisits a project he’s already done several times, a kitchen drawer organizer, and attempts to correct the errors of versions 1.0 and 2.0 with a new design:

Brass Magnifying Glass

This is one of those videos where you think, “For chrissakes, is there anything Jimmy DiResta can’t make?” This time ’round he finds an old magnifying lens, then crafts a beautiful brass handle and an encirclement to hold it in place. As always, half the fun is trying to figure out what each operation he’s doing will lead to:

Brass Testicle Holders

Yes, you read that right. You’ve gotta love any project that Frank Howarth prefaces with a warning that it involves a portion of the male anatomy. Asked to create a series of bases to hold an unusual commemorative item for a graduating class of urologists, Howarth proves he’s got the balls to tackle the project:

Homemade Kant Clamps

Izzy Swan likes Kant-twist clamps—you know, the little guy that inches across the screen at the end of every Frank Howarth video—and designs a burly DIY set for his own use:

Children’s Wagon

This week, Matthias Wandel builds a vehicle—well, a child’s wagon—for the newest member of the Wandel family:

Board-on-Board Cedar Fence

April Wilkerson’s no joke: It’s 104 degrees in Texas, and with everyone inside enjoying air conditioning, she’s outside working a welding rig and a chainsaw to kick off a large fencing project:

Outdoor Sink

This week, Bob Clagett tackles woodworking, metalworking and sewing to create this outdoor sink for the family home. One of the things I really dig about Clagett’s videos is that he always takes the time at the end to tell you what he learned, i.e. what he would’ve done differently if repeating the project.

Paulk Workbench by FastCap

We once interviewed Ron Paulk on the design of his innovative workbench, which he was selling plans for online. Now a ready-to-assemble iteration of the bench is going into production by FastCap, and Paulk is asking viewers: “How much should I charge for it?”

Pull-Out Storage Cabinet

Faced with an inconvenient, apparently unusable corner portion of a built-in, Sandra Powell figures out how to wring some usable and convenient storage out of it with this pull-out cabinet:

Leatherbound Notebook and Pencil Case

I love that Linn from Darbin Orvar, like DiResta, Clagett and Kampf, has a willingness to tackle any material rather than just staying in her comfort zone. Lately she’s expanded into leatherwork, and this week she makes her own “everyday carry” items—a leatherbound notebook and a wood-and-leather pencil case with a magnetic closure:

Screen Print Lights

This week, Laura Kampf builds two unconventional lamps, creating the structures out of wood and fronts each with an old screen print:


Core77

Magnifying Glass from Scratch, a Leatherbound Notebook & Pencil Case, a Brass Testicle Holder, Fixing Your Earlier Designs and More

Kitchen Drawer Organizer

I like what Steve Ramsey does here, which is demonstrate that a lot of times, your first and second design for something will not stand the test of time. Here he revisits a project he’s already done several times, a kitchen drawer organizer, and attempts to correct the errors of versions 1.0 and 2.0 with a new design:

Brass Magnifying Glass

This is one of those videos where you think, “For chrissakes, is there anything Jimmy DiResta can’t make?” This time ’round he finds an old magnifying lens, then crafts a beautiful brass handle and an encirclement to hold it in place. As always, half the fun is trying to figure out what each operation he’s doing will lead to:

Brass Testicle Holders

Yes, you read that right. You’ve gotta love any project that Frank Howarth prefaces with a warning that it involves a portion of the male anatomy. Asked to create a series of bases to hold an unusual commemorative item for a graduating class of urologists, Howarth proves he’s got the balls to tackle the project:

Homemade Kant Clamps

Izzy Swan likes Kant-twist clamps—you know, the little guy that inches across the screen at the end of every Frank Howarth video—and designs a burly DIY set for his own use:

Children’s Wagon

This week, Matthias Wandel builds a vehicle—well, a child’s wagon—for the newest member of the Wandel family:

Board-on-Board Cedar Fence

April Wilkerson’s no joke: It’s 104 degrees in Texas, and with everyone inside enjoying air conditioning, she’s outside working a welding rig and a chainsaw to kick off a large fencing project:

Outdoor Sink

This week, Bob Clagett tackles woodworking, metalworking and sewing to create this outdoor sink for the family home. One of the things I really dig about Clagett’s videos is that he always takes the time at the end to tell you what he learned, i.e. what he would’ve done differently if repeating the project.

Paulk Workbench by FastCap

We once interviewed Ron Paulk on the design of his innovative workbench, which he was selling plans for online. Now a ready-to-assemble iteration of the bench is going into production by FastCap, and Paulk is asking viewers: “How much should I charge for it?”

Pull-Out Storage Cabinet

Faced with an inconvenient, apparently unusable corner portion of a built-in, Sandra Powell figures out how to wring some usable and convenient storage out of it with this pull-out cabinet:

Leatherbound Notebook and Pencil Case

I love that Linn from Darbin Orvar, like DiResta, Clagett and Kampf, has a willingness to tackle any material rather than just staying in her comfort zone. Lately she’s expanded into leatherwork, and this week she makes her own “everyday carry” items—a leatherbound notebook and a wood-and-leather pencil case with a magnetic closure:

Screen Print Lights

This week, Laura Kampf builds two unconventional lamps, creating the structures out of wood and fronts each with an old screen print:


Core77

Magnifying Glass from Scratch, a Leatherbound Notebook & Pencil Case, a Brass Testicle Holder, Fixing Your Earlier Designs and More

Kitchen Drawer Organizer

I like what Steve Ramsey does here, which is demonstrate that a lot of times, your first and second design for something will not stand the test of time. Here he revisits a project he’s already done several times, a kitchen drawer organizer, and attempts to correct the errors of versions 1.0 and 2.0 with a new design:

Brass Magnifying Glass

This is one of those videos where you think, “For chrissakes, is there anything Jimmy DiResta can’t make?” This time ’round he finds an old magnifying lens, then crafts a beautiful brass handle and an encirclement to hold it in place. As always, half the fun is trying to figure out what each operation he’s doing will lead to:

Brass Testicle Holders

Yes, you read that right. You’ve gotta love any project that Frank Howarth prefaces with a warning that it involves a portion of the male anatomy. Asked to create a series of bases to hold an unusual commemorative item for a graduating class of urologists, Howarth proves he’s got the balls to tackle the project:

Homemade Kant Clamps

Izzy Swan likes Kant-twist clamps—you know, the little guy that inches across the screen at the end of every Frank Howarth video—and designs a burly DIY set for his own use:

Children’s Wagon

This week, Matthias Wandel builds a vehicle—well, a child’s wagon—for the newest member of the Wandel family:

Board-on-Board Cedar Fence

April Wilkerson’s no joke: It’s 104 degrees in Texas, and with everyone inside enjoying air conditioning, she’s outside working a welding rig and a chainsaw to kick off a large fencing project:

Outdoor Sink

This week, Bob Clagett tackles woodworking, metalworking and sewing to create this outdoor sink for the family home. One of the things I really dig about Clagett’s videos is that he always takes the time at the end to tell you what he learned, i.e. what he would’ve done differently if repeating the project.

Paulk Workbench by FastCap

We once interviewed Ron Paulk on the design of his innovative workbench, which he was selling plans for online. Now a ready-to-assemble iteration of the bench is going into production by FastCap, and Paulk is asking viewers: “How much should I charge for it?”

Pull-Out Storage Cabinet

Faced with an inconvenient, apparently unusable corner portion of a built-in, Sandra Powell figures out how to wring some usable and convenient storage out of it with this pull-out cabinet:

Leatherbound Notebook and Pencil Case

I love that Linn from Darbin Orvar, like DiResta, Clagett and Kampf, has a willingness to tackle any material rather than just staying in her comfort zone. Lately she’s expanded into leatherwork, and this week she makes her own “everyday carry” items—a leatherbound notebook and a wood-and-leather pencil case with a magnetic closure:

Screen Print Lights

This week, Laura Kampf builds two unconventional lamps, creating the structures out of wood and fronts each with an old screen print:


Core77

Magnifying Glass from Scratch, a Leatherbound Notebook & Pencil Case, a Brass Testicle Holder, Fixing Your Earlier Designs and More

Kitchen Drawer Organizer

I like what Steve Ramsey does here, which is demonstrate that a lot of times, your first and second design for something will not stand the test of time. Here he revisits a project he’s already done several times, a kitchen drawer organizer, and attempts to correct the errors of versions 1.0 and 2.0 with a new design:

Brass Magnifying Glass

This is one of those videos where you think, “For chrissakes, is there anything Jimmy DiResta can’t make?” This time ’round he finds an old magnifying lens, then crafts a beautiful brass handle and an encirclement to hold it in place. As always, half the fun is trying to figure out what each operation he’s doing will lead to:

Brass Testicle Holders

Yes, you read that right. You’ve gotta love any project that Frank Howarth prefaces with a warning that it involves a portion of the male anatomy. Asked to create a series of bases to hold an unusual commemorative item for a graduating class of urologists, Howarth proves he’s got the balls to tackle the project:

Homemade Kant Clamps

Izzy Swan likes Kant-twist clamps—you know, the little guy that inches across the screen at the end of every Frank Howarth video—and designs a burly DIY set for his own use:

Children’s Wagon

This week, Matthias Wandel builds a vehicle—well, a child’s wagon—for the newest member of the Wandel family:

Board-on-Board Cedar Fence

April Wilkerson’s no joke: It’s 104 degrees in Texas, and with everyone inside enjoying air conditioning, she’s outside working a welding rig and a chainsaw to kick off a large fencing project:

Outdoor Sink

This week, Bob Clagett tackles woodworking, metalworking and sewing to create this outdoor sink for the family home. One of the things I really dig about Clagett’s videos is that he always takes the time at the end to tell you what he learned, i.e. what he would’ve done differently if repeating the project.

Paulk Workbench by FastCap

We once interviewed Ron Paulk on the design of his innovative workbench, which he was selling plans for online. Now a ready-to-assemble iteration of the bench is going into production by FastCap, and Paulk is asking viewers: “How much should I charge for it?”

Pull-Out Storage Cabinet

Faced with an inconvenient, apparently unusable corner portion of a built-in, Sandra Powell figures out how to wring some usable and convenient storage out of it with this pull-out cabinet:

Leatherbound Notebook and Pencil Case

I love that Linn from Darbin Orvar, like DiResta, Clagett and Kampf, has a willingness to tackle any material rather than just staying in her comfort zone. Lately she’s expanded into leatherwork, and this week she makes her own “everyday carry” items—a leatherbound notebook and a wood-and-leather pencil case with a magnetic closure:

Screen Print Lights

This week, Laura Kampf builds two unconventional lamps, creating the structures out of wood and fronts each with an old screen print:


Core77

Magnifying Glass from Scratch, a Leatherbound Notebook & Pencil Case, a Brass Testicle Holder, Fixing Your Earlier Designs and More

Kitchen Drawer Organizer

I like what Steve Ramsey does here, which is demonstrate that a lot of times, your first and second design for something will not stand the test of time. Here he revisits a project he’s already done several times, a kitchen drawer organizer, and attempts to correct the errors of versions 1.0 and 2.0 with a new design:

Brass Magnifying Glass

This is one of those videos where you think, “For chrissakes, is there anything Jimmy DiResta can’t make?” This time ’round he finds an old magnifying lens, then crafts a beautiful brass handle and an encirclement to hold it in place. As always, half the fun is trying to figure out what each operation he’s doing will lead to:

Brass Testicle Holders

Yes, you read that right. You’ve gotta love any project that Frank Howarth prefaces with a warning that it involves a portion of the male anatomy. Asked to create a series of bases to hold an unusual commemorative item for a graduating class of urologists, Howarth proves he’s got the balls to tackle the project:

Homemade Kant Clamps

Izzy Swan likes Kant-twist clamps—you know, the little guy that inches across the screen at the end of every Frank Howarth video—and designs a burly DIY set for his own use:

Children’s Wagon

This week, Matthias Wandel builds a vehicle—well, a child’s wagon—for the newest member of the Wandel family:

Board-on-Board Cedar Fence

April Wilkerson’s no joke: It’s 104 degrees in Texas, and with everyone inside enjoying air conditioning, she’s outside working a welding rig and a chainsaw to kick off a large fencing project:

Outdoor Sink

This week, Bob Clagett tackles woodworking, metalworking and sewing to create this outdoor sink for the family home. One of the things I really dig about Clagett’s videos is that he always takes the time at the end to tell you what he learned, i.e. what he would’ve done differently if repeating the project.

Paulk Workbench by FastCap

We once interviewed Ron Paulk on the design of his innovative workbench, which he was selling plans for online. Now a ready-to-assemble iteration of the bench is going into production by FastCap, and Paulk is asking viewers: “How much should I charge for it?”

Pull-Out Storage Cabinet

Faced with an inconvenient, apparently unusable corner portion of a built-in, Sandra Powell figures out how to wring some usable and convenient storage out of it with this pull-out cabinet:

Leatherbound Notebook and Pencil Case

I love that Linn from Darbin Orvar, like DiResta, Clagett and Kampf, has a willingness to tackle any material rather than just staying in her comfort zone. Lately she’s expanded into leatherwork, and this week she makes her own “everyday carry” items—a leatherbound notebook and a wood-and-leather pencil case with a magnetic closure:

Screen Print Lights

This week, Laura Kampf builds two unconventional lamps, creating the structures out of wood and fronts each with an old screen print:


Core77

Creating a Magnifying Glass, a Leatherbound Notebook & Pencil Case, a Brass Testicle Holder, Fixing Your Earlier Designs and More

Kitchen Drawer Organizer

I like what Steve Ramsey does here, which is demonstrate that a lot of times, your first and second design for something will not stand the test of time. Here he revisits a project he’s already done several times, a kitchen drawer organizer, and attempts to correct the errors of versions 1.0 and 2.0 with a new design:

Brass Magnifying Glass

This is one of those videos where you think, “For chrissakes, is there anything Jimmy DiResta can’t make?” This time ’round he finds an old magnifying lens, then crafts a beautiful brass handle and an encirclement to hold it in place. As always, half the fun is trying to figure out what each operation he’s doing will lead to:

Brass Testicle Holders

Yes, you read that right. You’ve gotta love any project that Frank Howarth prefaces with a warning that it involves a portion of the male anatomy. Asked to create a series of bases to hold an unusual commemorative item for a graduating class of urologists, Howarth proves he’s got the balls to tackle the project:

Homemade Kant Clamps

Izzy Swan likes Kant-twist clamps—you know, the little guy that inches across the screen at the end of every Frank Howarth video—and designs a burly DIY set for his own use:

Children’s Wagon

This week, Matthias Wandel builds a vehicle—well, a child’s wagon—for the newest member of the Wandel family:

Board-on-Board Cedar Fence

April Wilkerson’s no joke: It’s 104 degrees in Texas, and with everyone inside enjoying air conditioning, she’s outside working a welding rig and a chainsaw to kick off a large fencing project:

Outdoor Sink

This week, Bob Clagett tackles woodworking, metalworking and sewing to create this outdoor sink for the family home. One of the things I really dig about Clagett’s videos is that he always takes the time at the end to tell you what he learned, i.e. what he would’ve done differently if repeating the project.

Paulk Workbench by FastCap

We once interviewed Ron Paulk on the design of his innovative workbench, which he was selling plans for online. Now a ready-to-assemble iteration of the bench is going into production by FastCap, and Paulk is asking viewers: How much should I charge for it?

Pull-Out Storage Cabinet

Faced with an inconvenient, apparently unusable corner portion of a built-in, Sandra Powell figures out how to wring some usable and convenient storage out of it with this pull-out cabinet:

Leatherbound Notebook and Pencil Case

I love that Linn from Darbin Orvar, like DiResta, Clagett and Kampf, has a willingness to tackle any material rather than just staying in her comfort zone. Lately she’s expanded into leatherwork, and this week she makes her own “everyday carry” items—a leatherbound notebook and a wood-and-leather pencil case with a magnetic closure:

Screen Print Lights

This week, Laura Kampf builds two unconventional lamps, creating the structures out of wood and fronts each with an old screen print:


Core77

Creating a Magnifying Glass, a Leatherbound Notebook & Pencil Case, a Brass Testicle Holder, Fixing Your Earlier Designs and More

Kitchen Drawer Organizer

I like what Steve Ramsey does here, which is demonstrate that a lot of times, your first and second design for something will not stand the test of time. Here he revisits a project he’s already done several times, a kitchen drawer organizer, and attempts to correct the errors of versions 1.0 and 2.0 with a new design:

Brass Magnifying Glass

This is one of those videos where you think, “For chrissakes, is there anything Jimmy DiResta can’t make?” This time ’round he finds an old magnifying lens, then crafts a beautiful brass handle and an encirclement to hold it in place. As always, half the fun is trying to figure out what each operation he’s doing will lead to:

Brass Testicle Holders

Yes, you read that right. You’ve gotta love any project that Frank Howarth prefaces with a warning that it involves a portion of the male anatomy. Asked to create a series of bases to hold an unusual commemorative item for a graduating class of urologists, Howarth proves he’s got the balls to tackle the project:

Homemade Kant Clamps

Izzy Swan likes Kant-twist clamps—you know, the little guy that inches across the screen at the end of every Frank Howarth video—and designs a burly DIY set for his own use:

Children’s Wagon

This week, Matthias Wandel builds a vehicle—well, a child’s wagon—for the newest member of the Wandel family:

Board-on-Board Cedar Fence

April Wilkerson’s no joke: It’s 104 degrees in Texas, and with everyone inside enjoying air conditioning, she’s outside working a welding rig and a chainsaw to kick off a large fencing project:

Outdoor Sink

This week, Bob Clagett tackles woodworking, metalworking and sewing to create this outdoor sink for the family home. One of the things I really dig about Clagett’s videos is that he always takes the time at the end to tell you what he learned, i.e. what he would’ve done differently if repeating the project.

Paulk Workbench by FastCap

We once interviewed Ron Paulk on the design of his innovative workbench, which he was selling plans for online. Now a ready-to-assemble iteration of the bench is going into production by FastCap, and Paulk is asking viewers: How much should I charge for it?

Pull-Out Storage Cabinet

Faced with an inconvenient, apparently unusable corner portion of a built-in, Sandra Powell figures out how to wring some usable and convenient storage out of it with this pull-out cabinet:

Leatherbound Notebook and Pencil Case

I love that Linn from Darbin Orvar, like DiResta, Clagett and Kampf, has a willingness to tackle any material rather than just staying in her comfort zone. Lately she’s expanded into leatherwork, and this week she makes her own “everyday carry” items—a leatherbound notebook and a wood-and-leather pencil case with a magnetic closure:

Screen Print Lights

This week, Laura Kampf builds two unconventional lamps, creating the structures out of wood and fronts each with an old screen print:


Core77

Creating a Magnifying Glass, a Leatherbound Notebook & Pencil Case, a Brass Testicle Holder, Fixing Your Earlier Designs and More

Kitchen Drawer Organizer

I like what Steve Ramsey does here, which is demonstrate that a lot of times, your first and second design for something will not stand the test of time. Here he revisits a project he’s already done several times, a kitchen drawer organizer, and attempts to correct the errors of versions 1.0 and 2.0 with a new design:

Brass Magnifying Glass

This is one of those videos where you think, “For chrissakes, is there anything Jimmy DiResta can’t make?” This time ’round he finds an old magnifying lens, then crafts a beautiful brass handle and an encirclement to hold it in place. As always, half the fun is trying to figure out what each operation he’s doing will lead to:

Brass Testicle Holders

Yes, you read that right. You’ve gotta love any project that Frank Howarth prefaces with a warning that it involves a portion of the male anatomy. Asked to create a series of bases to hold an unusual commemorative item for a graduating class of urologists, Howarth proves he’s got the balls to tackle the project:

Homemade Kant Clamps

Izzy Swan likes Kant-twist clamps—you know, the little guy that inches across the screen at the end of every Frank Howarth video—and designs a burly DIY set for his own use:

Children’s Wagon

This week, Matthias Wandel builds a vehicle—well, a child’s wagon—for the newest member of the Wandel family:

Board-on-Board Cedar Fence

April Wilkerson’s no joke: It’s 104 degrees in Texas, and with everyone inside enjoying air conditioning, she’s outside working a welding rig and a chainsaw to kick off a large fencing project:

Outdoor Sink

This week, Bob Clagett tackles woodworking, metalworking and sewing to create this outdoor sink for the family home. One of the things I really dig about Clagett’s videos is that he always takes the time at the end to tell you what he learned, i.e. what he would’ve done differently if repeating the project.

Paulk Workbench by FastCap

We once interviewed Ron Paulk on the design of his innovative workbench, which he was selling plans for online. Now a ready-to-assemble iteration of the bench is going into production by FastCap, and Paulk is asking viewers: How much should I charge for it?

Pull-Out Storage Cabinet

Faced with an inconvenient, apparently unusable corner portion of a built-in, Sandra Powell figures out how to wring some usable and convenient storage out of it with this pull-out cabinet:

Leatherbound Notebook and Pencil Case

I love that Linn from Darbin Orvar, like DiResta, Clagett and Kampf, has a willingness to tackle any material rather than just staying in her comfort zone. Lately she’s expanded into leatherwork, and this week she makes her own “everyday carry” items—a leatherbound notebook and a wood-and-leather pencil case with a magnetic closure:

Screen Print Lights

This week, Laura Kampf builds two unconventional lamps, creating the structures out of wood and fronts each with an old screen print:


Core77

Shut Up And Take My Balls! China’s Glass Walkway Opens In Tianmen Mountain

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Photo by VCG / VCG via Getty Images

China has opened a 100-metre-long glass skywalk stretching around a cliff on the side of the Tianmen Mountain in Hunan province. The skywalk provides a view of a 300-metre drop and overlooks Tongtian Avenue, a mountain road with 99 turns that snakes up the mountain. When translated in English, it means “Avenue to the Sky”. The 1.6-metre wide glass-floored skywalk has been dubbed “Coiling Dragon Cliff” and is the third of its kind in the area.

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Photo by VCG / VCG via Getty Images

The area is incredibly popular with tourists and has a range of attractions including a cable car that transports people from the nearby train station to the top of the mountain. The first of Tianmenshan’s skywalks opened in November 2011 and has since become a tourist hotspot. The world’s longest glass-bottom bridge is set to open soon in Zhangjiajie National Forest Park. The bridge will be 430-metres long and six metres wide.

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Photo by Imaginechina / Rex Features / Shutterstock

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Photo by Imaginechina / Rex Features / Shutterstock

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Photo by VCG / VCG via Getty Images

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Photo by Imaginechina / Rex Features / Shutterstock

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Photo by VCG / VCG via Getty Images

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Photo by Imaginechina / Rex Features / Shutterstock

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Photo by Reuters / Stringer


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

These Incredibly Realistic Sculptures of Jellyfish Appear to Be Swimming in Glass

California-based Rick Satava found the sight of thousands of jellyfish lazily swimming in a glass aquarium mesmerizing when he visited the Monterey Bay Aquarium in the late 1980s.

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Satava saw an opportunity to make art out of what he saw, and had the idea to capture the haunting beauty of jellyfish in glass.

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He spent the next three years in experimentation, trying to get the colors right and master the glass-in-glass technique.

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This technique is an art form that has existed for many centuries. It works by encasing a glass sculpture in a second layer of glass — hence, ‘glass-in-glass’. Glass is malleable when it’s still warm, so the artist can easily manipulate it into any form. With the help of translucent pigments, Satava was able to capture the undeniable beauty of jellyfish.

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He describes his sculptures as: “Vertically oriented, colorful, fanciful jellyfish with tendril-like tentacles and a rounded bell encased in an outer layer of rounded clear glass that is bulbous at the top and tapering toward the bottom to form roughly a bullet shape, with the jellyfish portion of the sculpture filling almost the entire volume of the outer, clear-glass shroud”.

Satava’s jellyfish sculptures were finally ready to be sold in public in 1990. And by 2002, he was designing and producing an average of 300 sculptures monthly.

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The jellyfish sculptures have become so popular that two of them even made an appearance in Marvel’s ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’.

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“Our jellyfish sculptures are in the recent movie, ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’, during two scenes in the broker’s gallery and we are thanked in the film’s credits. They used two pieces, one small Ribbed Purple Jellyfish and the other a Magnum Moon Jellyfish. If you had a chance to see the film, we hope you spotted them.”

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Satava’s amazing jellyfish sculptures are available for purchase here.

Via Pultastic, My Modern Met


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.