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Porsche may drop exclusive EA Games licensing agreement

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Porsche may finally be able to license their name and vehicles directly to whomever they want.

Continue reading Porsche may drop exclusive EA Games licensing agreement

Porsche may drop exclusive EA Games licensing agreement originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 12 Dec 2016 18:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Faster. Higher. Stronger: The Most Emotional Photos From The Rio 2016 Olympics Games, Part 3

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Germany’s Kira Walkenhorst (L) taps Germany’s Laura Ludwig during the women’s beach volleyball qualifying match between Germany and Canada at the Beach Volley Arena in Rio de Janeiro on August 9, 2016, for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Leon Neal/AFP Photo)

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Italy’s Marta Menegatti (L) jumps for the ball during the women’s beach volleyball qualifying match between Italy and Egypt at the Beach Volley Arena in Rio de Janeiro on August 9, 2016, for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP Photo)

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Doaa Elghobashy of Egypt celebrates while Marta Menegatti of Italy walks away during the Women’s Beach Volleyball Preliminary Pool A match on Day 4 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Beach Volleyball Arena on August 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

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Egypt’s Doaa Elghobashy, center, hits over Italy’s Laura Giombini, left, during a women’s beach volleyball match at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, August 9, 2016. (Photo by Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP Photo)

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U.S. gymnasts, left to right, Gabrielle Douglas, Aly Raisman, Simone Biles, Madison Kocian, and Lauren Hernandez pose for the camera at the end of the artistic gymnastics women’s team final at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, August 9, 2016. (Photo by Julio Cortez/AP Photo)

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The United States 4 x 200m freestyle relay team celebrates after winning a gold medal during to the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, August 9, 2016, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Morry Gash/AP Photo)

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China’s Liu Huixia and Chen Ruolin compete during the women’s synchronized 10-meter platform diving final in the Maria Lenk Aquatic Center at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, August 9, 2016. (Photo by Wong Maye-E/AP Photo)

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Belgium’s Dirk Van Tichelt celebrates after winning a bronze medal in the men’s 73-kg judo competition at at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, August 8, 2016. (Photo by Markus Schreiber/AP Photo)

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Ruby Harold of Great Britain competes on uneven bars during the women’s team gymnastics final on Tuesday, August 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The United States women won the event. (Photo by Aaron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post)

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Goalkeeper Rodrigo Faustino of Brazil warms up before the men’s field hockey game against Great Britain, on August 9, 2016. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

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Ruy Fonseca of Brazil is thrown off his horse, Tom Bombadill Too, as the horse refuses a jump during the Individual Jumping competition, August 9, 2016. (Photo by Jim Hollander/EPA)

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Catalina Usme #11 of Colombia celebrates her goal with teammates in the second half against the United States in the Women’s Football First Round Group G match on Day 4 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Amazonia Arena on August 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Bruno Zanardo/Getty Images)

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Norway’s Heidi Loke is fouled by Angola’s Luisa Kiala during the women’s preliminary handball match at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, August 10, 2016. (Photo by Matthias Schrader/AP Photo)

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Serbia guard Ana Dabovic reaches in and fouls United States guard Sue Bird (6) during the first half of a women’s basketball game at the Youth Center at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, August 10, 2016. (Photo by Carlos Osorio/AP Photo)

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Ireland’s Fiona Doyle competes in a heat of the women’s 200-meter breaststroke during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, August 10, 2016. (Photo by David J. Phillip/AP Photo)

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The United States team, Katie Ledecky, Allison Schmitt, Maya DiRado and Leah Smith celebrate winning the gold in the women’s 4×200-meter freestyle relay during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics, Thursday, August 11, 2016, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Lee Jin-man/AP Photo)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Weightlifting, Final, Women’s 63kg, Riocentro, Pavilion 2, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 9, 2016. Combination photo of Joana Palacios (ARG) of Argentina as she competes. (Photo by Yves Herman/Reuters)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Artistic Gymnastics, Final, Women’s Team Final, Rio Olympic Arena, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 9, 2016. Rebecca Downie (GBR) of United Kingdom competes on the beam during the women’s team final. (Photo by Dylan Martinez/Reuters)

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Football Soccer, Copa Sudamericana, Penarol vs Sportivo Luqueno, Feliciano Caceres stadium, Luque, Paraguay on August 9, 2016. Nicolas Albarracin of Uruguay’s Penarol reacts after he fails to score against Paraguay’s Sportivo Luqueno. (Photo by Jorge Adorno/Reuters)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Soccer, Preliminary, Women’s First Round, Group E China vs Sweden, Mane Garrincha Stadium, Brasilia, Brazil on August 9, 2016. Goalkeeper Lina Zhao (CHN) of China makes a save in traffic against Sweden. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Beach Volleyball, Women’s Preliminary, Beach Volleyball Arena, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 10, 2016. Sarah Pavan (CAN) of Canada embraces Heather Bansley (CAN) of Canada during their match against Switzerland. (Photo by Ruben Sprich/Reuters)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Fencing, Preliminary, Men’s Sabre Individual Table of 32, Carioca Arena 3, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 10, 2016. Alexey Yakimenko (RUS) of Russia and Pancho Paskov (BUL) of Bulgaria react. (Photo by Peter Cziborra/Reuters)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Judo, Final, Women, 70 kg Bronze Medal Contests, Carioca Arena 2, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 10, 2016. Sally Conway (GBR) of Britain celebrates winning the bronze medal as Bernadette Graf (AUT) of Austria reacts. (Photo by Toru Hanai/Reuters)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Weightlifting, Final, Women’s 69kg, Riocentro, Pavilion 2, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 10, 2016. Leidy Solis (COL) of Colombia competes. (Photo by Stoyan Nenov/Reuters)

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United States’ Kelsey Kolojejchick takes a shot past Japan’s Mayumi Ono, left, and Motomi Kawamura during a women’s field hockey match at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, August 10, 2016. (Photo by Dario Lopez-Mills/AP Photo)

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Ding Ning, of China, top, reacts after defeating Li Xiaoxia, of China, in the women’s singles table tennis gold medal match at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, August 10, 2016. (Photo by David Goldman/AP Photo)

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Joseph Clarke, of Britain, celebrates winning the gold medal in the kayak K1 men’s final of the canoe slalom at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, August 10, 2016. (Photo by Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP Photo)

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Bombayla Devi Laishram of India competes in the Women’s Individual round of 32 Elimination Round on Day 5 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Sambodromo on August 10, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

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United States’ April Ross, bottom, and Kerri Walsh Jennings celebrate after beating Switzerland during a women’s beach volleyball match at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, August 10, 2016. (Photo by Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP Photo)

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Australia’s Louise Bawden (L) and Australia’s Taliqua Clancy vie for the ball during the women’s beach volleyball qualifying match between the Netherlands and Australia at the Beach Volley Arena in Rio de Janeiro on August 10, 2016, for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Leon Neal/AFP Photo)

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Leidy Yessenia Solis Arboleda, of Colombia, celebrates after a lift in the women’s 69kg weightlifting competition at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, August 10, 2016. (Photo by Morry Gash/AP Photo)

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Marta Xargay #10 of Spain jumps over Xiaojia Chen #5 of China in the Women’s Basketball Preliminary Round Group B match between China and Spain on Day 5 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Youth Arena on August 10, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

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Serena Williams, of the United States, toss the ball on a serve to Elina Svitolina, of Urkaine, at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, August 9, 2016. (Photo by Charles Krupa/AP Photo)

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Liu Yongshi of China during her women’s Foil individual round of 32 bout against Edina Knapek of Hungary at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games Fencing events at the Carioca Arena 3 in the Olympic Park in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 10 August 2016. (Photo by Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA)

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Tunisia’s Ines Boubakri reacts after beating Canada’s Eleanor Harvey in their women’s individual foil quarter-final bout as part of the fencing event of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Carioca Arena 3 in Rio de Janeiro on August 10, 2016. (Photo by Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP Photo)

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China’s Wang Yan performs on the balance beam during the artistic gymnastics women’s individual all-around final at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, August 11, 2016. (Photo by Julio Cortez/AP Photo)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Artistic Gymnastics, Victory Ceremony, Women’s Individual All-Around Victory Ceremony, Rio Olympic Arena, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 11, 2016. Simone Biles (USA) of USA bites her gold medal on the podium after winning the women’s individual all-around final. (Photo by Dylan Martinez/Reuters)

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Bronze medalist, Russia’s Aliya Mustafina at an award ceremony for the artistic gymnastics women’s individual all-around final event at the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, August 11, 2016. (Photo by Valery Sharifulin/TASS/Newscom)

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Russia’s Violetta Kolobova celebrates after defeating Estonia during the bronze medal bout of the women’s epee team fencing competition in the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, August 11, 2016. (Photo by Gregory Bull/AP Photo)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Beach Volleyball, Women’s Preliminary, Beach Volleyball Arena, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 11, 2016. Brooke Sweat (USA) of USA competes. (Photo by Ricardo Moraes/Reuters)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Women’s Soccer, News Conference, Mineirao Stadium, Belo Horizonte, Brazil on August 11, 2016. Players from Brazil (BRA) visit the stadium the day before their match against Australia (AUS). (Photo by Mariana Bazo/Reuters)

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China’s Hao Jialu in the women’s épée team gold medal match against Romania in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 11, 2016. (Photo by Stanislav Krasilnikov/TASS)

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Rajiv Ouseph of Great Britain or Team GB competes against Petr Koukal of Czech Republic in the mens Badminton Singles on Day 6 of the 2016 Rio Olympics at Riocentro – Pavilion 4 on August 12, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images)

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Brazil players yell toward their teammates during a preliminary women’s water polo match against Russia at the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, August 11, 2016. (Photo by Sergei Grits/AP Photo)

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United States’ Kassidy Cook dives during a training session at the Maria Lenk Aquatic Center at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, August 11, 2016. (Photo by Wong Maye-E/AP Photo)

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Malaysia’s Pandelela Rinong dives during a training session at the Maria Lenk Aquatic Center at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday, August 11, 2016. (Photo by Wong Maye-E/AP Photo)

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Thailand’s Puttita Supajirakul is down on the court after a point during a women’s doubles badminton match against the Netherlands at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 11, 2016. (Photo by Kin Cheung/AP Photo)


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Faster. Higher. Stronger: The Most Emotional Photos From The Rio 2016 Olympics Games, Part 2

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Laura Giombini of Italy reacts during the Women’s Beach Volleyball preliminary round Pool D match against Jamie Lynn Broder and Kristina Valjas of Canada on Day 2 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Beach Volleyball Arena on August 7, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)

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US gymnast Simone Biles smiles during a practice session of the women’s Artistic gymnastics at the Olympic Arena on August 4, 2016 ahead of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. (Photo by Emmanuel Dunand/AFP Photo)

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Cuba’s Sergio Reynaldo Gonzalez Bayard reacts during the men’s beach volleyball qualifying match between Brazil and Cuba at the Beach Volley Arena in Rio de Janeiro on August 7, 2016, for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP Photo)

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Brazil’s Diego Hypolito reacts after competing in the qualifying for the men’s pommel horse event of the Artistic Gymnastics at the Olympic Arena during the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro on August 6, 2016. (Photo by Ben Stansall/AFP Photo)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Volleyball, Women’s Preliminary, Pool B USA vs Netherlands, Maracanazinho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 8, 2016. (L-R) Laura Dijkema (NED) of Netherlands,Lonneke Sloetjes (NED) of Netherlands and Robin de Kruijf (NED) of Netherlands celebrate a point. (Photo by Marcelo del Pozo/Reuters)

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Juan Martin Del Potro reacts against Novak Dokovic of Serbia in their singles match on Day 2 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Tennis Centre on August 7, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

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Dirk van Tichelt of Belgium reacts after defeating Changrim An of Korea in the Men’s -73 kg Judo elimination round on Day 3 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Carioca Arena 2 on August 8, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images)

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Netherlands’ Robin De Kruijf (L) and Netherlands’ Lonneke Sloetjes react following the women’s qualifying volleyball match between China and the Netherlands at the Maracanazinho stadium in Rio de Janeiro on August 6, 2016. (Photo by Pedro Ugarte/AFP Photo)

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Romania’s Adrian Crisan reacts after winning his men’s singles qualification round table tennis match against France’s Emmanuel Lebesson at the Riocentro venue during the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro on August 7, 2016. (Photo by Juan Mabromata/AFP Photo)

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Japan’s Kosuke Hagino prepares to compete in the Men’s 200m Freestyle Semifinal during the swimming event at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium in Rio de Janeiro on August 7, 2016. (Photo by Christophe Simon/AFP Photo)

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Spain’s centre Pau Gasol reacts during a Men’s round Group B basketball match between Croatia and Spain at the Carioca Arena 1 in Rio de Janeiro on August 7, 2016 during the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Andrej Isakovic/AFP Photo)

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USA’s Katie Ledecky reacts after breaking the Olympic record in the Women’s 400m Freestyle heats during the swimming event at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium in Rio de Janeiro on August 7, 2016. (Photo by Gabriel Bouys/AFP Photo)

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Mathlynn Sasser of Marshall Islands reacts during the Women’s 58kg Group B weightlifting contest on Day 3 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Riocentro – Pavilion 2 on August 8, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Lars Baron/Getty Images)

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Poland’s Malgorzata Kozaczuk reacts after losing to Tunisia’s Azza Besbes in their womens individual sabre qualifying bout as part of the fencing event of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, on August 8, 2016, at the Carioca Arena 3, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP Photo)

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Kacper Majchrzak of Poland reacts following the Men’s 200m Freestyle Final on Day 2 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on August 7, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)

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United States’ Michael Phelps arrives for a men’s 200-meter butterfly semifinal during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics, Monday, August 8, 2016, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Martin Meissner/AP Photo)

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Melissa Hoskins of the Australian women’s track cycling team is tended to after crashing during a training session inside the Rio Olympic Velodrome during the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, August 8, 2016. (Photo by Pavel Golovkin/AP Photo)

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Melissa Hoskins, left, of the Australian women’s track cycling team, reacts after crashing during a training session inside the Rio Olympic Velodrome during the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, August 8, 2016. (Photo by Patrick Semansky/AP Photo)

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Brazil’s Rafaela Silva, centre, celebrates after winning the gold medal of the women’s 57-kg judo competition at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, August 8, 2016. (Photo by Markus Schreiber/AP Photo)

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Kira Walkenhorst of Germany (L) signals as Doaa Elghobashy of Egypt (R) watches during the women’s Beach Volleyball preliminary pool D game between Ludwig/Walkenhors of Germany and Elghobashy/Nada of Egypt the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Beach Volleyball Arena on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 07 August 2016. (Photo by Antonio Lacerda/ANSA)

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Germany’s Laura Ludwig (R) watches as Egypt’s Doaa Elghobashy reacts during the women’s beach volleyball qualifying match between Germany and Egypt at the Beach Volley Arena in Rio de Janeiro on August 7, 2016, for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP Photo)

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Netherlands’ Marleen van Iersel dives for a ball during a women’s beach volleyball match against Costa Rica at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, August 8, 2016. (Photo by Petr David Josek/AP Photo)

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Sweden’s Nathalie Hagman, center, scores a penalty past the South Korean defense during the women’s preliminary handball match between Sweden and South Korea at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, August 8, 2016. (Photo by Ben Curtis/AP Photo)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Fencing, Semifinal, Women’s Sabre Individual Semifinals, Carioca Arena 3, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 8, 2016. Yana Egorian (RUS) of Russia celebrates winning the match. (Photo by Issei Kato/Reuters)

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Melinda Gaiger of Romania in action during their women’s handball game against Brazil, 2016 Rio Olympics, August 8, 2016, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Marko Djurica/Reuters)

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Angola’s Albertina Cruz Kassoma scores a goal during the women’s preliminary handball match between Angola and Montenegro at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, August 8, 2016. (Photo by Matthias Schrader/AP Photo)

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Tatyana Bilenko of Ukraine in action against Ho Ching Lee of Hong Kong during a third round Rio 2016 Olympic Games women’s table tennis match at Riocentro in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 08 August 2016. (Photo by Erik S. Lesser/EPA)

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Li Yang (C) of China vies for the ball with Jermaine Seoposenwe (L) and Linda Motlhalo (R) of South Africa during the women’s preliminary round match between South Africa and China for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games Soccer tournament at the Olympic Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 06 August 2016. (Photo by Orestis Panagiotou/EPA)

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Brittney Griner #15 of United States walks on the court during the women’s basketball game against Spain on Day 3 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Youth Arena on August 8, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

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Mathlynn Sasser, of the Marshall Islands, celebrates after a lift in the women’s 58kg weightlifting competition at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, August 8, 2016. (Photo by Mike Groll/AP Photo)

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France’s Sofiane Oumiha (L) lands a punch on Honduras’ Teofimo Andres Lopez Rivera during the Men’s Light (60kg) match at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Riocentro – Pavilion 6 in Rio de Janeiro on August 7, 2016. (Photo byYuri Cortez /AFP Photo)

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Switzerland’s Anouk Verge-Depre reacts after winning the women’s beach volleyball qualifying match between Switzerland and Australia at the Beach Volley Arena in Rio de Janeiro on August 8, 2016, for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo by Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP Photo)

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Russia’s Yulia Efimova cries after placing second in the women’s 100-meter breaststroke final during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics, Monday, August 8, 2016, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Matt Slocum/AP Photo)

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United States’ Chris Brooks celebrates after his routine on the parallel bars during the artistic gymnastics men’s team final at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, August 8, 2016. (Photo by Rebecca Blackwell/AP Photo)

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Angelica Roos, of Sweden, competes in the women’s 58kg weightlifting competition at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, August 8, 2016. (Photo by Mike Groll/AP Photo)

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France’s Manon Brunet celebrates winning against Tunisia’s Azza Besbes in their womens individual sabre quarter-final bout as part of the fencing event of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, on August 8, 2016, at the Carioca Arena 3, in Rio de Janeiro. (Photo by Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP Photo)

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Ukraine’s Olena Kravatska reacts as she competes against Ibtihaj Muhammad of the US during their women’s individual sabre qualifying bout as part of the fencing event of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, on August 8, 2016, at the Carioca Arena 3, in Rio de Janeiro. (Photo by Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP Photo)

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Telma Monteiro of Portugal reacts during her match in the women’s 57kg judo competition at the 2016 Rio Olympics, August 8, 2016, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Kai Pfaffenbach/Reuters)

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Rocio Campigli (with ball) of Argentina is surrounded by players from the Netherlands during their women’s handball game, at the 2016 Rio Olympics, August 8, 2016. (Photo by Antonio Bronic/Reuters)

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Oscar Albeiro Figueroa Mosquera, of Colombia, celebrates after winning the gold medal in the men’s 62kg weightlifting competition at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, August 8, 2016. Mosquera retired after his last lift. (Photo by Mike Groll/AP Photo)

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Katinka Hosszu of Hungary celebrates after winning the Women’s 100m Backstroke Final of the Swimming events during the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 8 August 2016. (Photo by Michael Kappeler/DPA via Newscom)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Weightlifting, Final, Women’s 63kg, Riocentro, Pavilion 2, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 9, 2016. Joana Palacios (ARG) of Argentina competes. (Photo by Yves Herman/Reuters)

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Algeria’s Ilyas Abbadi pauses as he fights Congo’s Mpi Anauel Ngamissengue during a men’s middleweight 75-kg preliminary boxing match at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, August 9, 2016. (Photo by Frank Franklin II/AP Photo)

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United States’ Michael Phelps pauses after winning the gold medal in the men’s 4×200-meter freestyle relay final during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, August 9, 2016, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Martin Meissner/AP Photo)

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Ding’Ning of China plays against Ying’Han of Germany during their table tennis match at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, August 9, 2016. (Photo by Natacha Pisarenko/AP Photo)

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2016 Rio Olympics, Weightlifting, Final, Women’s 63kg, Riocentro, Pavilion 2, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on August 9, 2016. Anni Vuohijoki (FIN) of Finland competes. (Photo by Stoyan Nenov/Reuters)

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Russia’s Yana Egorian celebrates winning against Russia’s Sofya Velikaya in winning their women’s individual sabre gold medal bout as part of the fencing event of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, on August 8, 2016, at the Carioca Arena 3, in Rio de Janeiro. (Photo by Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP Photo)

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Brazil guard Joice Rodrigues reacts after scoring and drawing a foul during the first half of a women’s basketball game against Belarus at the Youth Center at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, August 9, 2016. (Photo by Carlos Osorio/AP Photo)

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Kelley O’Hara #5 of the United States is hit in the face with the ball against Lady Andrade #16 of Colombia in the first half of the Women’s Football First Round Group G match on Day 4 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Amazonia Arena on August 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Bruno Zanardo/Getty Images)

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United States’ Crystal Dunn, top, celebrates scoring her side’s first goal with teammate Christen Press during a group G match of the women’s Olympic football tournament between Colombia and United States at the Arena Amazonia stadium in Manaus, Brazil, Tuesday, August 9, 2016. The game ended in a 2-2 draw. (Photo by Michael Dantas/AP Photo)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Alaskan town’s car-launching games are better than fireworks

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Yes, launching cars off a mountaintop is exactly as much fun as it sounds.

Continue reading Alaskan town’s car-launching games are better than fireworks

Alaskan town’s car-launching games are better than fireworks originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 07 Jul 2016 19:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Our Top 5 favorite road trip games of all time

Road trip games, those boredom-battling tests of concentration and quick vision meant to speed the hours, are some of the closest things we have to auto mythology.

Continue reading Our Top 5 favorite road trip games of all time

Our Top 5 favorite road trip games of all time originally appeared on Autoblog on Sat, 02 Jul 2016 19:02:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Design Job: Max Payne vs. GTA? Rockstar Games is Seeking an Illustrator in New York City

Rockstar Games is looking for highly talented artists to work out of its NYC based office. The successful candidate will be working on a variety of exciting, creative, and cutting edge projects. The ability to work quickly and efficiently as part of a team, take direction, and maintain a positive

View the full design job here
Core77

Host Your Own Hunger Games With President Snow’s Panem China

Did you watch the scrappy kids running around the Hunger Games and think they looked boring and overfed? Did you wait through the fight scenes for a glimpse of the opulence and intrigue of the Capitol elite? Do you love power, beauty, child-on-child violence, and lethally good dinner parties? This auction might be for you. 

Starting today, you can bid on the real porcelain dinner service used by President Snow in Hunger Games: Mockingjay–Part 2

Each item in the 20 piece dinner set bears the refined gilding, gold leaf and bold Panem insignia you’d expect on the table of the leader of a dictatorial yet taste-conscious hellscape. (As the critical eyes at CF File note, the designers clearly did their presidential dinnerware homework.) 

The set is made by non-fictional porcelain manufacturer Maison de la Porcelaine of France, and features four settings of large plates, dinner plates, salad plates, demitasse cups (“for espresso or a strong after dinner drink“) and saucers. Whether that’s an endorsement of real-life murder mystery dinners or not, this set could certainly bring an extra something to your entertaining to help command respect from your peon followers.

The bidding on Invaluable begins at $ 600. May the odds be ever full of flavor. 

JK this one’s Reagan’s.


Core77

Design Job: Bring Your Passion for Games to Hasbro in Pawtucket, RI

Candidates must have a Bachelors in Industrial Design or Advertising and will contribute to the development of game design strategies, maximize current technologies and trends, and leverage best practices. A minimum of 7 years of progressive experience in consumer packaged goods design, and previous experience developing licensed products is required.

View the full design job here
Core77

How to Play Classic Retro Games on Android

Thanks to the endless gifts that Moore’s Law continues to bestow upon us, cramming many of your favorite retro gaming systems into a phone that’s not much bigger than half a pack of playing cards has never been easier than it is today. Many of the most popular consoles from our past like NES, Sega Genesis, and Playstation One can all be enjoyed from wherever you are in the world thanks to mobile emulators, but getting started with emulation on Android is easier said than done.

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OUYA shows up at the FCC, has its guts splayed for the world to see

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It was only a matter of time, we suppose, before OUYA found itself on Uncle Sam’s table, and the day has finally come, as the open source console has made its way through the FCC. As we’ve steadily uncovered all of OUYA’s secrets since its inception, there’s not much new revealed by the government’s testing. That said, the flayed OUYA appears to be a founding backer edition, with the names of the chosen 11 inscribed on one side, but it’s exchanged the opaque power button on top for a clear unit — indicating that perhaps retail OUYA’s will make it easier for owners to tell when the thing’s on. Want to see the full monty for yourself? Theres’s plenty of pictures of the OUYA’s insides at the source link below.

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OUYA shows up at the FCC, has its guts splayed for the world to see

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Andreessen-Backed MinoMonsters Follows Rovio’s Lead, Signs Book Deal, Releases Trailer As It Plans Move Into TV, Film, Toys

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MinoMonsters launched in early 2011 on a mission to become the Pokémon of social games, allowing gamers to explore a world inhabited by bite-sized, furry monsters, taking them on quests and battling their friends. For this reason — and because founders Josh Buckley and Tyler Diaz were Y Combinator’s two youngest graduates at 18 and 17-years-old, respectively — the startup found some early buzz. And big things were expected.

But, as it goes with startups, there have been some ups and downs. Last summer, when MinoMonsters released v2.0 of its iOS game, it significantly altered the gameplay, doing away with quests to focus exclusively on one-on-one battles. As a result, Buckley decided to trim down the staff and start fresh, while Diaz left the startup to work on new projects.

Since MinoMonsters re-focused last year, things have moved forward pretty quickly, Buckley tells us. The startup’s iOS app now has 2.5 million downloads (adding 1 million players since the end of September), and became one of the top 50 grossing apps in Apple’s App Store this past weekend. That is largely due to an update to its app that was released last week. Revenue has since doubled in the past week and has increased 1,000 percent since December, Buckley says.

While the founder declined to share specific numbers, he did say that revenue is now “in the millions” and growing. Buckley attributes this to a “huge gap in the market” when it comes to companies looking to create the next Pokemon; however, although they’re targeting different age groups, Mind Candy and its Moshi Monsters may beg to differ on that one.

Nonetheless, to capitalize on the growing demand among young(er) gamers, MinoMonsters has now raised $2 million in funding (led by Andreessen Horowitz) and is looking to follow the Angry Birds path — to become an entertainment company, not just a gaming company. To this end, the startup just signed with William Morris, one of the largest agencies in Hollywood to help MinoMonsters make the jump to TV and film. At present, the startup has already signed a book deal through WME, but Buckley doesn’t want to stop there.

The founder tells us that the startup’s focus now is on moving quickly into licensing and merchandizing, and this year, he expects the company to launch lines of toys, books, trading cards and even clothes.

In the meantime, MinoMonsters is taking a page from Angry Birds, and, like its predecessor, is looking to create an animated series of cartoon shorts over the next couple of months, presumably aimed at developing interest in an animated TV series. You can see the first of these cartoon trailers made by its in-house animation team below. The startup has also acquired a small HTML5 game design firm to help it beef up its monster battles on iOS.

Over the long run, Buckley says that he wants MinoMonsters to not just take on Pokemon, but become the next Disney. It’s an ambitious goal, if not a bit over the top, but the founder says that he thinks the next-gen Disney will start with a design-centric, character-focused mobile game. And given the inroads Rovio has made in becoming a cross-channel brand, it’s not impossible.

Trailer below:

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Andreessen-Backed MinoMonsters Follows Rovio’s Lead, Signs Book Deal, Releases Trailer As It Plans Move Into TV, Film, Toys

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Amazon Expands Its Android Appstore To Nearly 200 Countries; It’s All About Scale

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Amazon today took a big step forward in its strategy to take its app distribution business — and its Kindle Fire hardware business — global: it announced that its Android-based Appstore will expand to cover “nearly 200″ countries, including adding Australia, Latin American countries like Brazil and Mexico, Canada, South Africa and South Korea. Up to now, the only countries where the Appstore was available were the U.S., UK, Germany, France, Italy, Spain and Japan.

Developers interested in distributing their apps to these new international users can start submitting their apps today, Amazon said. The storefronts themselves will be coming “in the coming months” when Amazon officially launches its Amazon Appstore for Android internationally.

Last quarter, Amazon missed on almost all analyst estimates but its stock soared anyway, partly because, as the WSJ points out, it was showing improvements in its operating income — a sign that its business of selling online on a grand scale continues to progress.

Amazon is due to announce its next quarterly results on April 25. Putting the news out today that it’s growing the scale of its digital content business even further helps them continue to sell that message in the lead-up to that.

It’s also an important message to lure more developers to its platform.

“Amazon’s platform is a complete end-to-end solution for developers wanting to build, market and monetize their apps and games on Kindle Fire and Android devices,” said Mike George, VP of Apps and Games at Amazon, in a statement. “Allowing developers to target distribution of their apps and games in even more international countries is yet another important milestone as we strive to serve consumers and developers globally. Many of our existing developers have localized their apps and games for international consumers, and we look forward to working with new developers that have been waiting to bring their apps to more Amazon customers across the globe.”

Amazon, as we have all come to expect by now, doesn’t give out specific numbers on how well apps (or its devices) are selling. (However, Flurry a year ago estimated that the Appstore generated nearly as much as Apple’s App Store, at 89% of Apple’s app revenues, with Google Play significantly behind them, making only 23% as much as Apple.

Since first launching the store in 2011, Amazon has gradually been offering different features in the Appstore to give developers more flexibility for how they charge users.

These include single-click purchasing, in-app purchasing, A/B testing capability, and GameCircle, launched last year, specifically to promote and use gaming apps. Amazon says that a study of 500 games that utilize in-app purchasing on Amazon found that those enabled to work via GameCircle earned 83% more average revenue per user than non-GameCircle games.

Amazon started as an online bookseller but has since expanded into electronics, home goods, fashion, digital content and much more. With that, it has built a business model around being aggressive on prices for consumers, making up for it with economies of scale. In that sense, taking its Appstore (and probably its hardware) to as wide an audience as possible is an essential move for the company.

But there could be another reason for ramping up Appstore distribution: Because a more powerful app storefront has become a prerequisite for many consumers when considering what mobile hardware to buy, the move is also a sign that Amazon could be gearing up to get more aggressive with its hardware strategy. Amazon currently sells Kindle e-readers and Kindle Fire tablets built on a forked version of Android. Many believe that it will add a smartphone to the lineup soon.

While Amazon has yet to announce a phone, there have been various signals that it does plan to do more with smartphones soon. Included in this is a carrier billing deal it has signed with Bango, which has yet to come into effect but looks like it might finally this year. Amazon’s Kindle Fire tablets largely work on WiFi connections (there is one model, the 8.9-inch Kindle Fire HD with LTE access, but so far this is only sold in the U.S.). But a smartphone would be more closely linked with mobile operators, making it more logical for Amazon to look for a way of making it easier for users to pay for content on its Appstore, especially in countries where credit card penetration is low.

Release below.

Amazon Expands Global App Distribution to Nearly 200 Countries – Developers Should Submit Their Apps Soon to Reach Millions More Active Amazon Customers

Developers around the world reporting high monetization rates with Kindle Fire and Amazon Appstore

SEATTLE–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Apr. 17, 2013– (NASDAQ: AMZN) – Amazon.com, Inc. continued the global expansion of its Appstore today by announcing that developers can now submit their apps for distribution in nearly 200 countries, including Australia, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, India, South Africa, South Korea, and even Papua New Guinea and Vatican City. These apps will be made available in the coming months when the Amazon Appstore for Android launches internationally for consumers. Registered developers who want international distribution will have their apps automatically made available for download, unless they designate otherwise. This international expansion is the latest in a series of Amazon Appstore for Android launches, which have included the UK, Germany, France, Italy, Spain and Japan. Signing up is easy and developers can get started today by visiting the Amazon Mobile App Distribution Portal.

Developers throughout the world are experiencing strong monetization and user engagement through Kindle Fire and the Amazon Appstore. The success is being driven by Amazon’s large customer base and industry-leading e-commerce features like 1-Click purchasing, Amazon’s APIs for In-App Purchasing (IAP) and A/B Testing, and GameCircle, Amazon’s gaming experience for Kindle Fire. A recent study of more than 500 games that utilize in-app purchasing on Amazon found that GameCircle-enabled mobile games earned 83 percent more average revenue per user (ARPU) than non-GameCircle games.

“Amazon’s platform is a complete end-to-end solution for developers wanting to build, market and monetize their apps and games on Kindle Fire and Android devices,” said Mike George, Vice President of Apps and Games at Amazon. “Allowing developers to target distribution of their apps and games in even more international countries is yet another important milestone as we strive to serve consumers and developers globally. Many of our existing developers have localized their apps and games for international consumers, and we look forward to working with new developers that have been waiting to bring their apps to more Amazon customers across the globe.”

Monetization Success
P2 Games is a UK based publisher of interactive games. “We launched our Kindle Fire version of Peppa Pig in January 2013 and within a couple of weeks we saw the sales on Kindle Fire overtake Google Play to a factor of four or five times,” said Peter Sleeman, Director, P2 Games Limited. “Kindle Fire is now a legitimate contender and although our apps have been out much longer on the iOS formats our current rate of sale is close to parity with iOS most days.”

Mobile Deluxe is the creator of popular games like Big Win Slots and Jewel Factory. “We see superior engagement, retention, and monetization from players who download our games from Amazon,” said Sean Thompson, Vice President of Mobile Deluxe. “The GameCircle integration is helping us achieve 40 percent better per-user monetization rates compared to non-Amazon players. We’re excited to continue this momentum as the Amazon Appstore grows into more and more international countries.”

Playmous is a UK mobile games publisher. “We were excited to see how fast the Kindle Fire install base was growing in the UK and other European countries,” said Anton Volnykh, Playmous. “Our initial launch on the Amazon Appstore in October was targeted to Europe only and we saw 4x growth in paid downloads when we launched the second campaign in just 6 weeks after the initial release. Moreover, our conversion rate from the free version to the paid version of the game has been 30% higher than on other app stores on average with the same product.”

Anuman Interactive is a French multimedia publishing company. “With 30 apps released since April 2012, more than 80 percent of the Anuman’s Android sales were realized on the Amazon Appstore,” said Stephane Longeard, CEO Anuman Interactive. “This store is extraordinarily easy to use with its recommendations system and secure 1-Click payment technology. We are really glad to reach people all over the world, thanks to Amazon Appstore.”

Developer Support
Big Duck Games is the developer of the popular puzzler Flow Free. “We’ve been distributing our games on Amazon since May 2012. Today, we have many hundreds of thousands of daily sessions on Amazon,” said Sharon Newman, Vice President, Big Duck Games. “It’s a great audience that deeply engages with our games, and we’re excited to reach an even larger audience with the added international launches of the Amazon Appstore.”

Imangi Studios is the creator of the popular game Temple Run. “We’ve integrated with Amazon’s In-App Purchasing and GameCircle APIs, which was a breeze,” says Keith Shephard, CEO of Imangi Studios. “We’ve seen significantly higher customer engagement with Temple Run since the integration, making the few, short steps worth it. We’re looking forward to following the Amazon Appstore as it expands into more international countries.”

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Amazon Expands Its Android Appstore To Nearly 200 Countries; It’s All About Scale

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Knights Of Glory Claims To Be The First Arabic MMO To Launch On The iPhone

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While world of Massively Multiplayer Online (MMO) games has ballooned in the last few years, the content available to people who’d rather not play a character from Western-inspired troops beating the crap out of some vague Eastern enemy has been somewhat limited. Culture is important, right? Which is why ‘Knights of Glory‘ – a sort of ‘Arabian Knights’ inspired MMO where warring Sultans of old wage war against each other with their Medieval-era armies – has been gathering pace as the only fully Arabic browser-based MMO. Think in terms of a sort of World of Warcraft for the Arab-speaking world. Today sees the release of the iPhone version of Knights of Glory, after its approval on Apple’s App Store, and the company claims this is the first Arabic MMO on the App Store.

“We didn’t believe in the potential of MMO games on mobile phones until we found many of our players asking for a mobile version,” says Radwan Kasmiya, chief producer for Falafel Games, which produces Knights of Glory. He points out that while the content and production is in the Middle East, the game development is actually done in Hangzhou, China. Yes folks, welcome to globalisation.

The story-driven RPG allows the player to take the role of a leader during a historically accurate era when Arabic kingdoms fought against each other. The game is very social, with players all over the Middle East socializing, competing and collaborating. Last year Knights of Glory won the Readers’ Award for the Best Arabic Browser Game for 2012 by ArabMMO, a news portal for MMOs in the Middle East.

Falafel Games was founded in 2008 by Kasmiya and Vince Ghossoub, with a mission to produce games from an Arab’s perspective in light of the dominance of Western narratives in the gaming industry. The company is venture-backed by the MBC Group and Middle East Venture Partners.

Knights of Glory will be released as a paid app, but you can sign up to try out the game for free in an early bird promotion by going here and redeeming a code to dowload the game from the App Store.

Check out the video below for instructions on how to sign up and a bit of a review. It’s in Arabic.



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Knights Of Glory Claims To Be The First Arabic MMO To Launch On The iPhone

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What Games Are: The Shady Side Of Games

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Editor’s note: Tadhg Kelly is a veteran game designer, creator of leading game design blog What Games Are and creative director of Jawfish Games. You can follow him on Twitter here.

There’s a reason why games and organized crime have often gone hand in hand. The thrill of the win, of achieving – often with money attached – has long proved a lure that society felt the need to control, like a drug. Games of chance, Poker, horse racing, sports betting and many others brought quixotic pleasures to many and bankruptcy (or worse) to some. There was always money to be made in the shadows for those happy to work in them.

That shady aspect still exists in the games industry today. While there are some highly ethical game makers out there who conduct their business in a manner befitting their ideals, there are also plenty who dupe and deceive to profit from an audience. Some are merely morally gray, maintaining that since games are a tough market and the cost of user acquisition is high, they have to be scrappy. Even if they don’t personally like it, it’s just how life is.

But beyond that typical red-ocean thinking, you can always rely on some developer or publisher to eventually take things too far. Like water flowing into every nook and cranny of a given platform, some will use their powers for good while others will figure out how to use a game as a form of arbitrage to extract as much value as possible. And you may say “well that’s business”, which it sometimes is. Yet shady actions can have far wider impact across the industry than is generally realized.

Take, for example, the practice of selling virtual goods in children’s games. Free-to-play games are very popular across all segments of the market, but the ability to sell items from within a game has the potential to deceive. While the notion of permitting players to financially participate as much as they want to is neat, many don’t fully realize what that means. Parents in particular are often unaware that their children know their iTunes passwords until big bills caused by their little angels buying $1000 worth of virtual game goods surface. And good luck getting a refund.

Because of course there are shady game makers out there who think it’s okay to put a $99 item in a game aimed at nine year olds. Of course they have an entirely self-reinforcing rationale for why this is permissible. Of course they use words like “choice” and “parental responsibility” to justify their actions. And yet they come across as weasels. In fact they ARE weasels. When this sort of nonsense goes on long enough, outsiders start to step in.

Government agencies like the UK’s Office of Fair Trading are starting to take a strong interest in free-to-play games. The OFT is an official consumer advocate group whose judgements can be far-reaching, and their recommendations often form the basis of legislation designed to clean up particularly egregious industries. This may serve as a wake-up call for the industry to self-regulate before regulation comes a-calling, or it may just be the tip of the iceberg. If, for example, the United States’ Department of Justice decides to do likewise, who knows how far that could go.

The problem for most of us who make games is that shady tactics tend to poison the well. The difference between the ideal of Facebook games (play together) and the practice (notify and spam repeatedly) is why social games stalled, for example. What could have been the most amazing platform change in gaming in a generation instead became a haven for sleazy lowball tactics designed to make a quick buck or an exit sale. Facebook’s early (and continuing) mistake lay in not taking an active-enough hand in managing their platform, preferring to let evolution sort it out.

The sale of crappy gamification “solutions” is another example. Through the work of writers like Sebastian Deterding, gamification has developed into a very interesting idea (with a variety of caveats, which I have written about before). Yet, regardless of where you stand on it, gamification has started to invert in large part because of the revelation that it mostly doesn’t work. There are many shady companies out there offering solutions that are little more than packs of GIFs and experience point tables, and of course that sours companies on trying gamification more than once.

It’s for reasons like these that I tend to strongly support Apple’s firm stance in governing the App Store. To some writers (like my Twitter buddy Keith Andrew at Pocketgamer), Apple’s control is only about maintaining profits and an iron-like grip on its customers, but I think there’s more to it than that. Apple takes an active hand in surfacing interesting apps because that’s important for the life of its platform, for the perception among users that iOS is where you go to find all the good stuff. The good stuff often needs a helping hand in the face of legions of developers hawking identical software with large advertising budgets.

Apple also bans or forbids certain apps on the basis of not wanting to dilute that conversation. Apps are not permitted to look like app stores, for example, or to use push notifications to advertise. Apps are not permitted to use incentivized installs. Apps are not permitted to deceive, in other words, or at the very least this is strong discouraged. And Apple seems as though it’s about to crack down on a number of apps that have been treading softly in these areas without directly violating them.

Apple seemed to realize early that shadiness would be problem that had to be curtailed or else the platform itself would be under threat. The risk to iOS of allowing it to be gamed or balkanized – as Facebook had – may not have been plainly apparent at the time, but in retrospect very much so. This is why the AppGratis-es of this world are heavily monitored. AppGratis appears to be just a typical example of needing to reign in wayward practices that would otherwise lead to bad places. Strong rules and enforcement is why iOS remains a vital development platform, and the one that users trust most. But of course, there are side effects.

Chief among them is censorship. As a medium, gaming is trying to come out of its teenage years and stop being regarded as mere entertainment. Some game makers want to feel that they stand shoulder to shoulder with writers, moviemakers and musicians in being regarded as artists, but regulation gets in the way.

In the old days it used to much worse. If you wanted to make games on a non-PC platform, such as a console, you had to factor in the risk that the platform might say no. The platform’s owners might not have even allowed you to have a dev kit to try unless your proposed game fit with their content strategy and guidelines.

These days platforms rarely exercise that kind of power and game making has become much more democratic, but there’s still a ways to go. Games like Sweatshop are banned according to content guidelines that would be considered unthinkable in book or music markets. The burgeoning zinester movement (artists who create games and related interactive art to explore a variety of issues) feels unwelcome and unlikely to become an Editor’s Choice because their work is not exactly PG13.

Unfortunately, like the Mob, shady game makers always be with us. There will always be someone who regards platforms like iOS as an opportunity to scavenge. There will always be someone who looks for the breaks, the wedges and the opportunity to behave like sharks. And they will always have a mealy mouthed rationale to justify their actions. None of us wants more censorship, or for games to be regulated to death. Most of us want the medium to thrive and grow and become as fully expressive. So as an industry it behoves us to establish codes of practice and police ourselves. Otherwise someone else will eventually do it for us.

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What Games Are: The Shady Side Of Games