Tag Archives: game

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Stunning Concept Art From The Video Game The Witcher 3 By CD Projekt Red

Established in 2002, located in Warsaw and Kraków, Poland, CD PROJEKT RED was born out of raw passion to video games. The studio’s founders: Michał Kiciński and Marcin Iwiński, both pioneers in video game distribution in Poland in the 90s, decided to employ their gaming industry experience in video game development. Hence, in 2007, The Witcher was born.

More info: The Witcher 3 (h/t: candb)

The game tells the story of Geralt of Rivia, who is a Witcher – a genetically enhanced human with special powers trained to slay monsters. The Witcher contains three different paths, which affect the game’s storyline. These paths are: alliance with the Scoia’tael (also called the Squirrels), a guerrilla freedom-fighting group of Elves and other non-humans; alliance with the Order of the Flaming Rose, whose knights protect the country of Temeria; or alliance with neither group to maintain ‘Witcher neutrality.’

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt concludes the story of the witcher Geralt of Rivia, whose story to date has been covered in the previous titles. Continuing from The Witcher 2, Geralt seeks to move on with his own life, embarking on a new and personal mission while the world order itself is coming to a change.























Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Stunning Concept Art From The Video Game The Witcher 3 By CD Projekt Red

Established in 2002, located in Warsaw and Kraków, Poland, CD PROJEKT RED was born out of raw passion to video games. The studio’s founders: Michał Kiciński and Marcin Iwiński, both pioneers in video game distribution in Poland in the 90s, decided to employ their gaming industry experience in video game development. Hence, in 2007, The Witcher was born.

More info: The Witcher 3 (h/t: candb)

The game tells the story of Geralt of Rivia, who is a Witcher – a genetically enhanced human with special powers trained to slay monsters. The Witcher contains three different paths, which affect the game’s storyline. These paths are: alliance with the Scoia’tael (also called the Squirrels), a guerrilla freedom-fighting group of Elves and other non-humans; alliance with the Order of the Flaming Rose, whose knights protect the country of Temeria; or alliance with neither group to maintain ‘Witcher neutrality.’

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt concludes the story of the witcher Geralt of Rivia, whose story to date has been covered in the previous titles. Continuing from The Witcher 2, Geralt seeks to move on with his own life, embarking on a new and personal mission while the world order itself is coming to a change.























Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Stunning Concept Art From The Video Game The Witcher 3 By CD Projekt Red

Established in 2002, located in Warsaw and Kraków, Poland, CD PROJEKT RED was born out of raw passion to video games. The studio’s founders: Michał Kiciński and Marcin Iwiński, both pioneers in video game distribution in Poland in the 90s, decided to employ their gaming industry experience in video game development. Hence, in 2007, The Witcher was born.

More info: The Witcher 3 (h/t: candb)

The game tells the story of Geralt of Rivia, who is a Witcher – a genetically enhanced human with special powers trained to slay monsters. The Witcher contains three different paths, which affect the game’s storyline. These paths are: alliance with the Scoia’tael (also called the Squirrels), a guerrilla freedom-fighting group of Elves and other non-humans; alliance with the Order of the Flaming Rose, whose knights protect the country of Temeria; or alliance with neither group to maintain ‘Witcher neutrality.’

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt concludes the story of the witcher Geralt of Rivia, whose story to date has been covered in the previous titles. Continuing from The Witcher 2, Geralt seeks to move on with his own life, embarking on a new and personal mission while the world order itself is coming to a change.























Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

The next Monopoly game may feature one or more of these auto-themed pieces

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The classic race car may have some new garagemates.

Continue reading The next Monopoly game may feature one or more of these auto-themed pieces

The next Monopoly game may feature one or more of these auto-themed pieces originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 10 Jan 2017 14:05:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog

Best Game Invention Ever: Mousetrap Jenga!

If you’re the type of yellowbelly that jumps at loud noises, yeah, maybe stock Jenga is exciting enough for you. I mean nothing gets the adrenaline going like the sound of small wooden blocks clattering on a tabletop, amirite? But for those of you interested in introducing some real stakes—like physical pain—what you need to do is make little tiny Jenga blocks, followed by a trip to the hardware store. Then you can make a real game.

Now presenting: Mousetrap Jenga!

Who knew Gandalf’s younger brother was such a goddamned coward? 

Man up, Randalf!


Core77

Best Game Invention Ever: Mousetrap Jenga!

If you’re the type of yellowbelly that jumps at loud noises, yeah, maybe stock Jenga is exciting enough for you. I mean nothing gets the adrenaline going like the sound of small wooden blocks clattering on a tabletop, amirite? But for those of you interested in introducing some real stakes—like physical pain—what you need to do is make little tiny Jenga blocks, followed by a trip to the hardware store. Then you can make a real game.

Now presenting: Mousetrap Jenga!

Who knew Gandalf’s younger brother was such a goddamned coward? 

Man up, Randalf!


Core77

Best Game Invention Ever: Mousetrap Jenga!

If you’re the type of yellowbelly that jumps at loud noises, yeah, maybe stock Jenga is exciting enough for you. I mean nothing gets the adrenaline going like the sound of small wooden blocks clattering on a tabletop, amirite? But for those of you interested in introducing some real stakes—like physical pain—what you need to do is make little tiny Jenga blocks, followed by a trip to the hardware store. Then you can make a real game.

Now presenting: Mousetrap Jenga!

Who knew Gandalf’s younger brother was such a goddamned coward? 

Man up, Randalf!


Core77

Design Job: Game On! Dick’s Sporting Goods is Seeking a UX Designer in Pittsburgh, PA

The UX Designer is responsible for delivering the creative vision, user experience and acting as the voice of the customer for their respective projects and products. They will need to build strong relationships with product management peers, development, design, site merchandising and other critical partners. Success in this role will

View the full design job here
Core77

Is This New Tesla Model a Game Changer for the Auto Industry? 

This week we bring you our pressing topic of the moment straight from our reader-driven discussion boards! Some Core77 readers got excited about the announcement of Tesla’s new Model 3 recently being revealed and wanted to see what our community of auto-heads had to say about it. Coffee87 asks: 

“So its unveiled now, the Model 3! Starting at $ 35,000.
What do you all think about it? 
Possible “game changer” for the auto industry?”

The responses, as always, have been mixed in the car world. Some people seem to be weirded out by the grill-less facade. “I don’t want a fake grill in front, but I would like… something… there,” says Scott Bennett, “the surfacing suggests a grill, which makes it looks like it’s missing. And it’s going to look pants with a front license plate.” (Editors Note: in case you weren’t aware, “pants” is essentially hilarious British slang for “terrible”

Coffee87 retorts, saying, “I absolutely love the front end design with the sports car style nose, a hint for but lack of a grill and the headlights. I think that by leaving design cues for where a grill should be but not actually including it works great. It creates this intrigue and statement ‘I`m electric’.”

What do you think? Is this new model sleek or a total blunder—and why? Share your thoughts with us in the comment feed below!

(Also feel free to check out the original post and contribute on our discussion board!)


Core77

Datsun Day: A Little Game of Car Spotting in Downtown Portland

Luke and I (Jeff) are the regular bloggers over at Hand-Eye Supply. We usually write about cars, photos, and the history and machines behind those two things. We thought there might be a way for us, despite haling from different disciplines, to combine our talents into one blogging force. The idea is “Worn Warriors.” We venture into downtown Portland, find something vintage we like, I shoot some photos, and Luke offers his technical take on what we find, while I’ll give my emotional response. Our first iteration is below, and it’s “Datsun Day.”

1984 DATSUN 720, Old Town Portland

Luke’s Take:

Ah yes, the Nissan/Datsun 720. A well-engineered and exceptionally popular little Japanese truck that is growing rarer by the hour. This example is a pretty bare bones example with some “custom touches” by owners over the years. When purchased off the lot, a number of exciting options were available, from the covered “bushmaster” to the sport version somewhat tactlessly dubbed the “Li’l Hustler.” This truck has none of them. It looks like a previous owner, often referred to as a “p.o.” by car people, pop riveted some dorky aluminum trim to the sides of the truck. Perhaps dorky is too harsh. Rakish is a better adjective.

While mechanically these trucks were very well made (one can coax many many miles out of one with regular maintenance) the bodies are prone to rust. Perhaps the rubber bumper added along the belt line of the truck was placed there to keep other careless drivers from dooring the truck, caving in its brittle body panels. It appears that it is suffering somewhat serious automotive leprosy as the rear bottom panel off the bed has fallen clean off. But heck, I bet if it’s treated right, this little truck has plenty of life still in it.

Jeff’s Take:

Surrounded by cars not even a decade old, it would be easy to dismiss this ole Datsun as a piece of trash. Perhaps you could mistake it for a dirty, rotten, surprisingly gigantic orange peel. Maybe you would pass it on the street, and like flying by somebody you know from high school, think, “I know that thing from somewhere.”

I’ll tell you where I know it from: my sweetest dreams. Many nights have held the hand of the Sandman across the center console as oldies played through a moldy, rusty radio. I’ve cruised the roads of the Columbia River Gorge in a deep sleep, suddenly startled by a crashing sound, pulling over in the Dalles only to discover the entire back half of my beloved Datsun has fallen off and been swallowed by a massive sturgeon fish. I’ve caught many Zs to the thought of these cracked headlights. This are sweet dreams I have. So finding this dirty, rotten, bright, beautiful, oldie-but-a-goodie orange peel in downtown today was a victory.

1975ish DATSUN CAMPER

Luke’s Take:

What a dreamboat! All the convenience of home in a tiny aluminum-sided package. These lil’ Datsun Campers were direct competition for the tiny Toyota Campers of the same era, but undoubtably the Datsun’s had more style. Park it anywhere! You can afford the gas! Let’s hit the road! Thank the stranger who left the cool custom graphics on the back!

Jeff’s Take:

When I imagine my future, the white picket fence is seldom there. Instead, there’s often some sort of camper. Admittedly and unashamedly: it’s usually a Minnie-Winnie. But I suppose in my more modest imaginings of future life, I live in a Datsun Camper. Stumbling upon, or rather being startled, by this camper today was a nice dose of reality. It felt like the Portland streets reached out and said, “It’s okay to be a Datsun,” which I interpreted as, “It’s okay to be you.” Whether you imagine the white picket fence, a condo in a thriving metropolis, or a grossly hip tiny house, take a moment and imagine that we’re all born to live in these modest, oddly melancholy Datsun Campers. Humbling, isn’t it? But not bad at all.


Core77

Datsun Day: A Little Game of Car Spotting in Downtown Portland

Luke and I (Jeff) are the regular bloggers over at Hand-Eye Supply. We usually write about cars, photos, and the history and machines behind those two things. We thought there might be a way for us, despite haling from different disciplines, to combine our talents into one blogging force. The idea is “Worn Warriors.” We venture into downtown Portland, find something vintage we like, I shoot some photos, and Luke offers his technical take on what we find, while I’ll give my emotional response. Our first iteration is below, and it’s “Datsun Day.”

1984 DATSUN 720, Old Town Portland

Luke’s Take:

Ah yes, the Nissan/Datsun 720. A well-engineered and exceptionally popular little Japanese truck that is growing rarer by the hour. This example is a pretty bare bones example with some “custom touches” by owners over the years. When purchased off the lot, a number of exciting options were available, from the covered “bushmaster” to the sport version somewhat tactlessly dubbed the “Li’l Hustler.” This truck has none of them. It looks like a previous owner, often referred to as a “p.o.” by car people, pop riveted some dorky aluminum trim to the sides of the truck. Perhaps dorky is too harsh. Rakish is a better adjective.

While mechanically these trucks were very well made (one can coax many many miles out of one with regular maintenance) the bodies are prone to rust. Perhaps the rubber bumper added along the belt line of the truck was placed there to keep other careless drivers from dooring the truck, caving in its brittle body panels. It appears that it is suffering somewhat serious automotive leprosy as the rear bottom panel off the bed has fallen clean off. But heck, I bet if it’s treated right, this little truck has plenty of life still in it.

Jeff’s Take:

Surrounded by cars not even a decade old, it would be easy to dismiss this ole Datsun as a piece of trash. Perhaps you could mistake it for a dirty, rotten, surprisingly gigantic orange peel. Maybe you would pass it on the street, and like flying by somebody you know from high school, think, “I know that thing from somewhere.”

I’ll tell you where I know it from: my sweetest dreams. Many nights have held the hand of the Sandman across the center console as oldies played through a moldy, rusty radio. I’ve cruised the roads of the Columbia River Gorge in a deep sleep, suddenly startled by a crashing sound, pulling over in the Dalles only to discover the entire back half of my beloved Datsun has fallen off and been swallowed by a massive sturgeon fish. I’ve caught many Zs to the thought of these cracked headlights. This are sweet dreams I have. So finding this dirty, rotten, bright, beautiful, oldie-but-a-goodie orange peel in downtown today was a victory.

1975ish DATSUN CAMPER

Luke’s Take:

What a dreamboat! All the convenience of home in a tiny aluminum-sided package. These lil’ Datsun Campers were direct competition for the tiny Toyota Campers of the same era, but undoubtably the Datsun’s had more style. Park it anywhere! You can afford the gas! Let’s hit the road! Thank the stranger who left the cool custom graphics on the back!

Jeff’s Take:

When I imagine my future, the white picket fence is seldom there. Instead, there’s often some sort of camper. Admittedly and unashamedly: it’s usually a Minnie-Winnie. But I suppose in my more modest imaginings of future life, I live in a Datsun Camper. Stumbling upon, or rather being startled, by this camper today was a nice dose of reality. It felt like the Portland streets reached out and said, “It’s okay to be a Datsun,” which I interpreted as, “It’s okay to be you.” Whether you imagine the white picket fence, a condo in a thriving metropolis, or a grossly hip tiny house, take a moment and imagine that we’re all born to live in these modest, oddly melancholy Datsun Campers. Humbling, isn’t it? But not bad at all.


Core77