Tag Archives: feature

Vivaldi browser now packs a History feature to dig into your browsing habits

The latest version of the Vivaldi browser is out sporting a new History feature that’s unlike the same component in competing browsers. The new feature includes graphics, statistics, and a calandar-based view for easy tracking.

The post Vivaldi browser now packs a History feature to dig into your browsing habits appeared first on Digital Trends.

Digital Trends

The next Monopoly game may feature one or more of these auto-themed pieces

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The classic race car may have some new garagemates.

Continue reading The next Monopoly game may feature one or more of these auto-themed pieces

The next Monopoly game may feature one or more of these auto-themed pieces originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 10 Jan 2017 14:05:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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No Spoilers: Aston Martin’s “Aeroblade” Feature Provides Downforce Without the Tail

Back in the ’80s, spoilers on performance cars were the thing. But now they look kind of crass and they spoil, for lack of a better word, the visual lines of the car.

Aston Martin’s design team has thus designed their DB11 with an “aeroblade” feature: Air gets sucked into vents aft of the rear passenger windows, then shoots out of a vent in the deck lid, providing downforce without requiring that absurd whale tail.

The rest of the car doesn’t look—nor sound—too shabby either!

If I knew anybody who had this car, I would wait until they left it unattended, then I’d totally load that air chamber up with glitter.


Core77

No Spoilers: Aston Martin’s “Aeroblade” Feature Provides Downforce Without the Tail

Back in the ’80s, spoilers on performance cars were the thing. But now they look kind of crass and they spoil, for lack of a better word, the visual lines of the car.

Aston Martin’s design team has thus designed their DB11 with an “aeroblade” feature: Air gets sucked into vents aft of the rear passenger windows, then shoots out of a vent in the deck lid, providing downforce without requiring that absurd whale tail.

The rest of the car doesn’t look—nor sound—too shabby either!

If I knew anybody who had this car, I would wait until they left it unattended, then I’d totally load that air chamber up with glitter.


Core77

No Spoilers: Aston Martin’s “Aeroblade” Feature Provides Downforce Without the Tail

Back in the ’80s, spoilers on performance cars were the thing. But now they look kind of crass and they spoil, for lack of a better word, the visual lines of the car.

Aston Martin’s design team has thus designed their DB11 with an “aeroblade” feature: Air gets sucked into vents aft of the rear passenger windows, then shoots out of a vent in the deck lid, providing downforce without requiring that absurd whale tail.

The rest of the car doesn’t look—nor sound—too shabby either!

If I knew anybody who had this car, I would wait until they left it unattended, then I’d totally load that air chamber up with glitter.


Core77

No Spoilers: Aston Martin’s “Aeroblade” Feature Provides Downforce Without the Tail

Back in the ’80s, spoilers on performance cars were the thing. But now they look kind of crass and they spoil, for lack of a better word, the visual lines of the car.

Aston Martin’s design team has thus designed their DB11 with an “aeroblade” feature: Air gets sucked into vents aft of the rear passenger windows, then shoots out of a vent in the deck lid, providing downforce without requiring that absurd whale tail.

The rest of the car doesn’t look—nor sound—too shabby either!

If I knew anybody who had this car, I would wait until they left it unattended, then I’d totally load that air chamber up with glitter.


Core77

Bizarre, Colorful Hairstyles Feature Images Of Animals Shaved Into Back Of Heads

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Based in Saint Petersburg, Russian hairdresser Aliya Askarova, who is also the creative director of Image Studio Denis Osipov, has created these amazing works of hair art. She first shaves the back of the head according to the shape requested by the customer before dyeing it in all sorts of colors to make the image pop. So far, we have seen hairstyles featuring animals such as a cat, a fox and a whale.

More info: Aliya Askarova (h/t: designtaxi)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Bizarre, Colorful Hairstyles Feature Images Of Animals Shaved Into Back Of Heads

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Based in Saint Petersburg, Russian hairdresser Aliya Askarova, who is also the creative director of Image Studio Denis Osipov, has created these amazing works of hair art. She first shaves the back of the head according to the shape requested by the customer before dyeing it in all sorts of colors to make the image pop. So far, we have seen hairstyles featuring animals such as a cat, a fox and a whale.

More info: Aliya Askarova (h/t: designtaxi)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Bizarre, Colorful Hairstyles Feature Images Of Animals Shaved Into Back Of Heads

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Based in Saint Petersburg, Russian hairdresser Aliya Askarova, who is also the creative director of Image Studio Denis Osipov, has created these amazing works of hair art. She first shaves the back of the head according to the shape requested by the customer before dyeing it in all sorts of colors to make the image pop. So far, we have seen hairstyles featuring animals such as a cat, a fox and a whale.

More info: Aliya Askarova (h/t: designtaxi)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Design Job: Searching for a New Job Sucks! Lucky For You, Dyson is Seeking a Product Feature Designer in Malmesbury, United Kingdom

The Product Feature designer will be expected to generate new ideas for future connected products that are both product enhancing, innovative and accurately timed in the fast moving world of connected products. At Dyson we are encouraged to think differently, challenge convention and be unafraid to make mistakes. We’re creative, collaborative, practical and enthusiastic. But most of all we’re hugely passionate about what we do.

View the full design job here
Core77

Yahoo Will Shut Down Upcoming, Deals, SMS Alerts, Kids, Some Of Mail To Focus On Apps You’ll Use Daily

Yahoo Axe

Yahoo has just announced a change in strategy designed to prep it for the mobile age and let it concentrate on core products like the Mail and Weather apps it launched yesterday. Soon, it will shut down Upcoming, Deal, SMS Alerts, Yahoo Kids, Yahoo! Mail and Messenger feature phone (J2ME) apps, and some older versions of Yahoo! Mail. People simply don’t have the bandwidth for dozens of apps, so best to do a few well.

When I spoke to Yahoo earlier this year, representatives mentioned the company had over 80 mobile apps. Yet I know few people with any from Yahoo on their homescreen. That’s the real estate that truly matters, so cutting the fat and focusing on where it can really be best in class seems like a smart move.

On April 30th, many of this round will go dark. As for the details, Upcoming and its API will shut down and you can download your info here. Deals will close but you can save your coupons first. SMS Alerts will stop but you can follow Yahoo’s various news sites with its mobile apps, or set up email alerts through Yahoo Messenger. Kids, formerly Yahooligans, but kids under 13 can still get a  Yahoo ID through the Family Accounts program. Feature phone (J2ME) versions of Mail and Messenger will close, but you can still use the mobile web versions of Mail and Messenger, or download the native apps.

As for older versions of Yahoo Mail including Yahoo Mail Classic, they will close starting the week of June 3rd. Yahoo encourages people to switch to the new Mail product, and to use the HTML only / basic version if you’re on a slow connection, dial-up, or old browser. Yahoo also offers a Mail migration program.

The question now is what about Yahoo’s bigger products that don’t perform as well, such as Search and Maps. I heard rumors soon after Marissa Mayer took charge that she was not interested in competing with Google’s far superior maps product anymore. That means this could be just the first wave of shut downs.

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Yahoo Will Shut Down Upcoming, Deals, SMS Alerts, Kids, Some Of Mail To Focus On Apps You’ll Use Daily

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Google’s Forthcoming Chat Client “Babel” Shows Up All Over The Web In Screenshots, Bug Reports, Forums & More

Google-Babel

Google Babel, the forthcoming unified messenger service from Google that’s all but confirmed thanks to a number of screenshots, bug reports, developer forum posts and more, is now being said to only include Google Talk, Google Hangouts and Messenger in its initial release. Google Voice integration, apparently, is on the back burner.

This is the latest from Android enthusiast site Droid-Life, which is reporting that Google Voice will eventually come to the platform, but not at launch. The service will include notification syncing across devices and platforms, which is similar to Apple’s iMessage in that it will work on desktop, tablet and phone, the report states citing undisclosed sources.

The site also claims to have gotten its fingers on a Google memo about Babel, which details the feature set, noting that it works on the desktop via a Chrome app, includes Google+ Hangouts, offers cross-platform notifications, includes over 800 emoji+, has the ability to go on or off record like in Google Chat, and will even involve an iOS native application.

This news follows earlier reports (which Droid-Life backs up in its post) from TechRadar. That site says that the name is in fact Babel and not “Babble,” per the original Geek.com leak. That’s something it learned from screenshots sent by an anonymous source. (See below)

From TechCrunch’s own ex-Googler sources, we’ve confirmed this service is coming, and we’ve also been pointed to bug reports (not publicly accessible), which reference the name “Google Babel.”

Of course, this doesn’t mean Babel will be the commercial name for the product once it goes live, but it does confirm that it’s the name being used internally.

We were also pointed to this Google+ post, which reconfirms the name, again thanks to a bug report. The post reads:

And here we are – first sign of the Google Babel Android app!

/data/data/com.google.android.apps.babel/lib/libvideochat_jni.so

Looks like there will be video…

Source:https://code.google.com/p/webrtc/issues/detail?id=826

Most official Google apps start with “com.google.android.apps” like inhttps://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.android.apps.docsor https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.android.apps.plus

So let’s keep an eye on this url https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.android.apps.babel

This post included a screenshot as well:

The name “Babel” has also been popping up in Gmail (source 1, source 2 – verified by AndroidPolice.com)

You can actually find information about Babel all over the web if you’re looking in the right spot. For example, a ton of bug reports discussed here, hereherehere and elsewhere on Google Groups refer to Babel by name.

Screenshots below:

Gmail’s Google Groups page also has a post from a user who spotted Babel (which looks like the image that later made it to Google+):

So while the above don’t confirm the final product name or launch date (probably Google I/O, though), it definitely looks like Babel is the real deal. Now, who wants to a leak an APK?

Lead image credit: Phonearena

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Google’s Forthcoming Chat Client “Babel” Shows Up All Over The Web In Screenshots, Bug Reports, Forums & More

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Facebook Asks You To Please Select Your Emotion

Facebook Emotion Sharing

It could make us more willing to express how we feel. Or you could say it over-simplies our complex moods and lives. But today the Facebook status update box began offering the option to “share how you’re feeling or what you’re doing” through a drop-down menu of emoticons and media. We’re entering a more structured era of communication, where both friends and big data know exactly how we tick.

Facebook began testing the new sharing options in January, but only released screenshots. Now it appears the feature has been given to a much wider audience. It’s likely the beginning of a global or at least US or English language rollout. I’ve contacted Facebook for details. Most mentions I’ve seen of the feature have been from the US, and many note the similarity to an old Myspace mood sharing option.

Once you have it, when you go to share a status update from Facebook’s desktop site or the mobile site m.facebook.com, you’ll see a smiley face button between the options to add a photo and select the privacy setting.

The button lets you select to share what you’re feeling, watching, reading, listening to, drinking, or eating. Each brings up a sub-menu of emotions, media, or nourishments. You can add an extra description if you want, and when you share the post will have “is feeling comfortable” with an emoticon or “watching Game Of Thrones” with an image and link to a piece of content’s Page at the end of your story.

Facebook’s little intro pop-up notifies you that “Details you add to posts also appear on your About page and other places on Facebook”. That means they could be used as recommendations for Pages, eventually wind up in Graph Search, or potentially even be used as ads shown to your friends. I go into detail of the business ramifications in my article from when the feature went into testing.

What’s just as fascinating as ads for Kleenex when we’re sad or where we sip our coffee influencing search result rankings is what the feature could do to two core ways we communicate on social media.We talk a lot about what we’re doing. The music we’re listening to, the TV shows we’re watching, and the places we’re getting drunk. By making it easier to formally tag these things, we provide a better gateway to experiencing them for our friends.

Rather than go searching for Robert Delong, my new favorite musician who sounds like the second coming of The Postal Service but with bass, I can select him from a smart type-ahead drop-down. Friends can then click through to his Facebook profile and hit the “Listen” button to automatically play him on their preferred streaming app. I didn’t have to go search for a YouTube link or even use Facebook’s search box and copy his Page’s URL. I browsed for and added what I wanted to share, all from within the status composer.

Then there’s the fuzzy side. Emotions. Sharing how we feel. To some it comes easy, with exclamation points, colorful language, or typed-in emoticons. For them, mood sharing could let them do it fast, and with a bonus little graphic that could draw people’s eyes. But to others, saying how they feel is tough. You might fear you can’t boil down emotions like anguish or dumbfounded excitement. That you’ll lose something in translation. And you might be right.

But the option to select and share a pre-constructed emotion could make some people more open than they usually are. And that’s whole point of Facebook.

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Facebook Asks You To Please Select Your Emotion

Image Co-Founder-Composite.jpg

5 Things to Look for in a Co-Founder

Co-founder-composite

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Choosing someone to start a business with is a lot like choosing who you want to marry. You’re going to spend countless hours together and there will often be disagreements, but ultimately you know that you are both working toward a common goal — whether that is a successful business venture or a happy marriage

Starting a business is undoubtedly exciting, and it is easy to get caught up in the glamour of finally being your own boss. However, when it comes down to choosing your co-founder, it is important to make an informed and level-headed decision

Before you jumpstart your new business venture, read on to learn the essential qualities that you should look for in a co-founder — these entrepreneurs have had experiences good and bad, and their insights will save you some headaches during the startup phase. Read more…

More about Startups, Business, Entrepreneurship, Feature, and Co Founder

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5 Things to Look for in a Co-Founder

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Chat Multi-Tasking Is How Facebook Home Could Rattle Apple And Google

Facebook Chat Multi-Tasking

Single-tasking has been a hallmark of mobile. But Facebook Home lets you chat in an overlaid drop-down window as you use Google, Yelp, Maps or any other app, bringing the productivity of the desktop to the small screen. Home’s cover feed and responsive design are nice, but you could call them mediocre. Chat multi-tasking, though, merges the communication and computing sides of the smartphone.

Innovation doesn’t need to hit you over the head. It just has to solve a problem in a new way. Until now, a real hinderance to text messaging on mobile was context switching. You were either communicating with someone, or you were in another app. ‘Or’. Not ‘And’. What Android and iOS call “multi-tasking” is really just more rapid switching. Even with pop-over notifications, you still had to leave one app and open another to respond. That moment you see your current activity fade to black and a messaging app ascend to replace it causes a mental break.

This context switching is unnatural and unhelpful. Often we are communicating about what we’re computing — giving someone the answer to a question, making a joint decision, guiding someone to a destination, or discussing a piece of content found online. I’ve definitely had to go back and forth multiple times in frustration between SMS or Facebook Messenger and other apps when I couldn’t remember a set of directions or other complicated string of information I was trying to pass to a friend. The best option was to carry on a voice call over speakerphone as you navigate around the phone, and some connection types don’t even support this.

Our desire to converse as we cruise around the digital world stems from pre-mobile behavior patterns. Humans have always been able to talk while doing something else at the same time. Since the days of IRC and (TechCrunch parent company) AOL’s Instant Messenger, you could browse the web or use other apps with a chat window floating on top. We were led to believe there simply wasn’t enough space on our little mobile screens to do this. Maybe on big phablets like the Galaxy Note II or full-size tablets like the iPad, but not a traditional-sized smartphone screen.

Facebook’s designers weren’t satisfied with that. They are obsessed with modeling mobile after how we conduct our lives in person. That’s why they built “read receipts” into Messenger a year ago. They mimic the body language cues that tell us someone heard what we said At the time, I asked Facebook Director Of Product Peter Deng who oversees messaging about the philosophy behind alerting people when their messages are read by their recipients. He told me:

“Technology has always been here to assist us, not to get in our way, not to make us think too much. We’re building technologies that are modeled after real life conversations. We start with people and how we’ve been wired for thousands of years to behave. ‘How do you get things closer to face-to-face?’ Everything we do is built on this social principle. What we’re doing today is just the start.”

Chat multi-tasking in Home is the next step he was alluding to. When someone messages you, a little bubble with their face pops up over the top of whatever app you’re using. A preview of the first dozen characters of the message splays out sideways from their head. What’s special is that if you tap their face, rather than closing your current app and opening Facebook Messenger, the bubble scoots to the top of the screen and an overlaid message window drops down from it with part of your currently used app still visible. Tap their face again and the message window retracts, revealing what you were doing with no context lost. When I used it in the launch event’s demo area, I was very impressed by how seamlessly it worked into typical mobile activity. Rather than being interruptive, chatting felt complementary to whatever I was doing.

This system brings us one step closer to bonafide simultaneous messaging and mobile activity. In my opinion, the only serious shortcoming is that you can’t park the overlaid chat window on part of the screen and scroll around the exposed background app behind it. There isn’t a ton of room for this on the HTC First screen and some standard Androids, but I still think it’d be useful. Luckily the trend is growing screen sizes, so we’ll likely have more space soon.

Everyone I showed the Facebook Home hands-on video to or described the homescreen replacement app to has fixated on chat multi-tasking, which Facebook has given the silly name of “Chat Heads”. When I showed the Home video to a group of three decidedly non-techie 27-year-old women in Washington, DC, it was Chat Heads that surprised and elated them. It was met with calls of “I want that” and even one “I want to buy that” in regards to the HTC First running Home.

The feature is a true game-changer because I believe we’ll see similar functionality emulated and improved upon in other apps and operating systems. I would be extremely surprised and disappointed if the next version of Apple’s iMessage didn’t have some kind of chat multi-tasking. The same goes for the Google’s rumored unified messaging system that’s supposed to launch at some point in the near future. Hopefully they’ll offer true, simultaneous messaging and other app usage.

Until then, Chat Heads could be the feature that convinces people to download Facebook Home or buy an HTC First. The messaging space has gotten extraordinarily hot these last few years as companies realize just how long we spend texting, and how much valuable data about who we care about comes with it. Instant, asynchronous mobile messaging brought us the ability to communicate as we go about our offline days. That’s why SMS got so popular. But as we increasingly live digitally within the infinite potential of our smartphones, we need messaging broken out of its silo.

Read more of our coverage and analysis of the Facebook Home Launch.

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Chat Multi-Tasking Is How Facebook Home Could Rattle Apple And Google