Tag Archives: design

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

The Design Flaws in This Otherwise Nifty Portable Cassette Player

Sometimes novel designs are not good ones, but have enough “wow” factor to create desirability in those who aren’t thinking it through. I’ll put this Elbow portable cassette player concept in this category. Designed to reduce a Walkman to the barest minimum, it consists of a biaxial arm and provides what initially looks to be a satisfying way to interface with and manipulate a cassette.

The first axis of the arm allows the user to clasp it shut, inserting a spindle into one of the cassette’s gears. The device is then rotated so that the magnetic head can read the tape.

Controls are provided by a single dial which regulates the volume, play, and fast forward functions.

Seems nifty, doesn’t it? But we see several problems that actually make this design a step backwards from Sony’s venerated Walkman. First off is the problem of directionality/orientation. Cassettes have two sides, and the user selects which side of the tape they’d like to listen to. With the Walkman and every other cassette player, this problem is solved in an obvious way: The desired side of the cassette faces outwards.

With the design of the Elbow, “outwards” is presumably the side with the dial on it. But the user is presented with one spindle and two cassette eyes that it could possibly be inserted into. Because the motor only rotates in one direction (there is no rewind functionality), the user must insert it into the correct hole, or risk unspooling the tape on one reel without the slack being taken up by the other reel. So right away, we’ve got the potential for operator error.

The second, more glaring problem is that the device appears to have been designed to make a neat photograph, rather than considering how the user will actually interact with it. Here’s what we mean:

Is the Elbow meant to be held in one’s hand for the entirety of the listening session? Or thrown in a bag? Either way the design, which leaves parts of the cassette exposed, presents a problem. Walkmen, while in use, were either held in the hand (while jogging, for instance), thrown into a jacket pocket, clipped to one’s belt or thrown into a bag. In all four of those scenarios, both eyes of the cassette and the exposed portion of the tape are completely enclosed by the Walkman; there is no danger that the user’s sweaty grip, or debris in a pocket or bag, will interfere with the tape or the cassette’s eyes. The relatively smooth outer shape of a Walkman also provided no sharp surfaces or undercuts which could snag on something. Those positive qualities are absent on the Elbow.

Nevertheless, we’ll probably continue to see these images being eagerly forwarded on social media, with folks proclaiming it a neat design. I suppose it is neat. It’s just not practical nor user-friendly.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Design Job: Stop, Collaborate and Listen! Atlassian is Seeking a Senior Product Designer in Mountain View, CA

Atlassian and Confluence have landed in Mountain View! Join our brand new, fast-growing office in Mountain View as a product designer of one of our flagship products, Confluence. Confluence is used by more than half of Fortune 100 companies to connect people with content and co-workers they

View the full design job here
Core77

Mobile Woodshop Design Updates, How to Build a Modular Bed with Storage, a DIY Plastics Shredder & More

How to Make a Lightsaber

For Star Wars day, Bob Clagett fulfills a longtime goal and figures out how to build a lightsaber with convincing sound and illumination. Along the way he has to overcome multiple setbacks, but he pulls it off:

Update on the Design of the Mobile Woodshop

Ron Paulk is eager to “start making sawdust,” to get to work on his new mobile woodshop. “But the design is king and must come first,” he says, and here he pushes himself to make some crucial last-minute design changes, going over them in CAD:

How To Build a Queen Size Modular Bed

Linn from Darbin Orvar shows how to make a queen-size bed with integrated storage, and which is built in modules thatmake it easy to transport:

Small Tall Freakbike

Laura Kampf builds a crazy tall bike by splicing small- and regular-sized bike frames together:

DIY Steel I-Beam Table

In an effort to push out of his comfort zone, Ben Uyeda makes a table out of a steel I-beam—using nothing more than a $ 45 angle grinder:

Pentagon Pencil Cup in Walnut and Aluminum

Ben Brandt makes a nifty pentagonal pencil holder, using a simple method that doesn’t require doing a lot of math:

Building a Plastics Shredder Out of Wood, Part 1

Jeremy Fielding has been recycling his own plastic, melting it down and re-forming it to use as raw material. Now he wants to build his own shredder to make the process easier. Here he’s starting with Dave Hakkens’ DIY shredder design, and seeing if he can make it without needing to weld, and at a very low cost:

Making 70 Hammers! Part 1

Here blacksmith Alec Steele uses a forge and a power hammer to turn billets into mallet heads:

(If you want to see the rest of the series, click here.)

Classic Toolbox

In this Rockler-sponsored vid, Jimmy DiResta builds a classic tool chest using traditional techniques but some fancy hinge hardware:


Core77

Mobile Woodshop Design Updates, How to Build a Modular Bed with Storage, a DIY Plastics Shredder & More

How to Make a Lightsaber

For Star Wars day, Bob Clagett fulfills a longtime goal and figures out how to build a lightsaber with convincing sound and illumination. Along the way he has to overcome multiple setbacks, but he pulls it off:

Update on the Design of the Mobile Woodshop

Ron Paulk is eager to “start making sawdust,” to get to work on his new mobile woodshop. “But the design is king and must come first,” he says, and here he pushes himself to make some crucial last-minute design changes, going over them in CAD:

How To Build a Queen Size Modular Bed

Linn from Darbin Orvar shows how to make a queen-size bed with integrated storage, and which is built in modules thatmake it easy to transport:

Small Tall Freakbike

Laura Kampf builds a crazy tall bike by splicing small- and regular-sized bike frames together:

DIY Steel I-Beam Table

In an effort to push out of his comfort zone, Ben Uyeda makes a table out of a steel I-beam—using nothing more than a $ 45 angle grinder:

Pentagon Pencil Cup in Walnut and Aluminum

Ben Brandt makes a nifty pentagonal pencil holder, using a simple method that doesn’t require doing a lot of math:

Building a Plastics Shredder Out of Wood, Part 1

Jeremy Fielding has been recycling his own plastic, melting it down and re-forming it to use as raw material. Now he wants to build his own shredder to make the process easier. Here he’s starting with Dave Hakkens’ DIY shredder design, and seeing if he can make it without needing to weld, and at a very low cost:

Making 70 Hammers! Part 1

Here blacksmith Alec Steele uses a forge and a power hammer to turn billets into mallet heads:

(If you want to see the rest of the series, click here.)

Classic Toolbox

In this Rockler-sponsored vid, Jimmy DiResta builds a classic tool chest using traditional techniques but some fancy hinge hardware:


Core77

Mobile Woodshop Design Updates, How to Build a Modular Bed with Storage, a DIY Plastics Shredder & More

How to Make a Lightsaber

For Star Wars day, Bob Clagett fulfills a longtime goal and figures out how to build a lightsaber with convincing sound and illumination. Along the way he has to overcome multiple setbacks, but he pulls it off:

Update on the Design of the Mobile Woodshop

Ron Paulk is eager to “start making sawdust,” to get to work on his new mobile woodshop. “But the design is king and must come first,” he says, and here he pushes himself to make some crucial last-minute design changes, going over them in CAD:

How To Build a Queen Size Modular Bed

Linn from Darbin Orvar shows how to make a queen-size bed with integrated storage, and which is built in modules thatmake it easy to transport:

Small Tall Freakbike

Laura Kampf builds a crazy tall bike by splicing small- and regular-sized bike frames together:

DIY Steel I-Beam Table

In an effort to push out of his comfort zone, Ben Uyeda makes a table out of a steel I-beam—using nothing more than a $ 45 angle grinder:

Pentagon Pencil Cup in Walnut and Aluminum

Ben Brandt makes a nifty pentagonal pencil holder, using a simple method that doesn’t require doing a lot of math:

Building a Plastics Shredder Out of Wood, Part 1

Jeremy Fielding has been recycling his own plastic, melting it down and re-forming it to use as raw material. Now he wants to build his own shredder to make the process easier. Here he’s starting with Dave Hakkens’ DIY shredder design, and seeing if he can make it without needing to weld, and at a very low cost:

Making 70 Hammers! Part 1

Here blacksmith Alec Steele uses a forge and a power hammer to turn billets into mallet heads:

(If you want to see the rest of the series, click here.)

Classic Toolbox

In this Rockler-sponsored vid, Jimmy DiResta builds a classic tool chest using traditional techniques but some fancy hinge hardware:


Core77

Mobile Woodshop Design Updates, How to Build a Modular Bed with Storage, a DIY Plastics Shredder & More

How to Make a Lightsaber

For Star Wars day, Bob Clagett fulfills a longtime goal and figures out how to build a lightsaber with convincing sound and illumination. Along the way he has to overcome multiple setbacks, but he pulls it off:

Update on the Design of the Mobile Woodshop

Ron Paulk is eager to “start making sawdust,” to get to work on his new mobile woodshop. “But the design is king and must come first,” he says, and here he pushes himself to make some crucial last-minute design changes, going over them in CAD:

How To Build a Queen Size Modular Bed

Linn from Darbin Orvar shows how to make a queen-size bed with integrated storage, and which is built in modules thatmake it easy to transport:

Small Tall Freakbike

Laura Kampf builds a crazy tall bike by splicing small- and regular-sized bike frames together:

DIY Steel I-Beam Table

In an effort to push out of his comfort zone, Ben Uyeda makes a table out of a steel I-beam—using nothing more than a $ 45 angle grinder:

Pentagon Pencil Cup in Walnut and Aluminum

Ben Brandt makes a nifty pentagonal pencil holder, using a simple method that doesn’t require doing a lot of math:

Building a Plastics Shredder Out of Wood, Part 1

Jeremy Fielding has been recycling his own plastic, melting it down and re-forming it to use as raw material. Now he wants to build his own shredder to make the process easier. Here he’s starting with Dave Hakkens’ DIY shredder design, and seeing if he can make it without needing to weld, and at a very low cost:

Making 70 Hammers! Part 1

Here blacksmith Alec Steele uses a forge and a power hammer to turn billets into mallet heads:

(If you want to see the rest of the series, click here.)

Classic Toolbox

In this Rockler-sponsored vid, Jimmy DiResta builds a classic tool chest using traditional techniques but some fancy hinge hardware:


Core77

Mobile Woodshop Design Updates, How to Build a Modular Bed with Storage, a DIY Plastics Shredder & More

How to Make a Lightsaber

For Star Wars day, Bob Clagett fulfills a longtime goal and figures out how to build a lightsaber with convincing sound and illumination. Along the way he has to overcome multiple setbacks, but he pulls it off:

Update on the Design of the Mobile Woodshop

Ron Paulk is eager to “start making sawdust,” to get to work on his new mobile woodshop. “But the design is king and must come first,” he says, and here he pushes himself to make some crucial last-minute design changes, going over them in CAD:

How To Build a Queen Size Modular Bed

Linn from Darbin Orvar shows how to make a queen-size bed with integrated storage, and which is built in modules thatmake it easy to transport:

Small Tall Freakbike

Laura Kampf builds a crazy tall bike by splicing small- and regular-sized bike frames together:

DIY Steel I-Beam Table

In an effort to push out of his comfort zone, Ben Uyeda makes a table out of a steel I-beam—using nothing more than a $ 45 angle grinder:

Pentagon Pencil Cup in Walnut and Aluminum

Ben Brandt makes a nifty pentagonal pencil holder, using a simple method that doesn’t require doing a lot of math:

Building a Plastics Shredder Out of Wood, Part 1

Jeremy Fielding has been recycling his own plastic, melting it down and re-forming it to use as raw material. Now he wants to build his own shredder to make the process easier. Here he’s starting with Dave Hakkens’ DIY shredder design, and seeing if he can make it without needing to weld, and at a very low cost:

Making 70 Hammers! Part 1

Here blacksmith Alec Steele uses a forge and a power hammer to turn billets into mallet heads:

(If you want to see the rest of the series, click here.)

Classic Toolbox

In this Rockler-sponsored vid, Jimmy DiResta builds a classic tool chest using traditional techniques but some fancy hinge hardware:


Core77

Mobile Woodshop Design Updates, How to Build a Modular Bed with Storage, a DIY Plastics Shredder & More

How to Make a Lightsaber

For Star Wars day, Bob Clagett fulfills a longtime goal and figures out how to build a lightsaber with convincing sound and illumination. Along the way he has to overcome multiple setbacks, but he pulls it off:

Update on the Design of the Mobile Woodshop

Ron Paulk is eager to “start making sawdust,” to get to work on his new mobile woodshop. “But the design is king and must come first,” he says, and here he pushes himself to make some crucial last-minute design changes, going over them in CAD:

How To Build a Queen Size Modular Bed

Linn from Darbin Orvar shows how to make a queen-size bed with integrated storage, and which is built in modules thatmake it easy to transport:

Small Tall Freakbike

Laura Kampf builds a crazy tall bike by splicing small- and regular-sized bike frames together:

DIY Steel I-Beam Table

In an effort to push out of his comfort zone, Ben Uyeda makes a table out of a steel I-beam—using nothing more than a $ 45 angle grinder:

Pentagon Pencil Cup in Walnut and Aluminum

Ben Brandt makes a nifty pentagonal pencil holder, using a simple method that doesn’t require doing a lot of math:

Building a Plastics Shredder Out of Wood, Part 1

Jeremy Fielding has been recycling his own plastic, melting it down and re-forming it to use as raw material. Now he wants to build his own shredder to make the process easier. Here he’s starting with Dave Hakkens’ DIY shredder design, and seeing if he can make it without needing to weld, and at a very low cost:

Making 70 Hammers! Part 1

Here blacksmith Alec Steele uses a forge and a power hammer to turn billets into mallet heads:

(If you want to see the rest of the series, click here.)

Classic Toolbox

In this Rockler-sponsored vid, Jimmy DiResta builds a classic tool chest using traditional techniques but some fancy hinge hardware:


Core77

Mobile Woodshop Design Updates, How to Build a Modular Bed with Storage, a DIY Plastics Shredder & More

How to Make a Lightsaber

For Star Wars day, Bob Clagett fulfills a longtime goal and figures out how to build a lightsaber with convincing sound and illumination. Along the way he has to overcome multiple setbacks, but he pulls it off:

Update on the Design of the Mobile Woodshop

Ron Paulk is eager to “start making sawdust,” to get to work on his new mobile woodshop. “But the design is king and must come first,” he says, and here he pushes himself to make some crucial last-minute design changes, going over them in CAD:

How To Build a Queen Size Modular Bed

Linn from Darbin Orvar shows how to make a queen-size bed with integrated storage, and which is built in modules thatmake it easy to transport:

Small Tall Freakbike

Laura Kampf builds a crazy tall bike by splicing small- and regular-sized bike frames together:

DIY Steel I-Beam Table

In an effort to push out of his comfort zone, Ben Uyeda makes a table out of a steel I-beam—using nothing more than a $ 45 angle grinder:

Pentagon Pencil Cup in Walnut and Aluminum

Ben Brandt makes a nifty pentagonal pencil holder, using a simple method that doesn’t require doing a lot of math:

Building a Plastics Shredder Out of Wood, Part 1

Jeremy Fielding has been recycling his own plastic, melting it down and re-forming it to use as raw material. Now he wants to build his own shredder to make the process easier. Here he’s starting with Dave Hakkens’ DIY shredder design, and seeing if he can make it without needing to weld, and at a very low cost:

Making 70 Hammers! Part 1

Here blacksmith Alec Steele uses a forge and a power hammer to turn billets into mallet heads:

(If you want to see the rest of the series, click here.)

Classic Toolbox

In this Rockler-sponsored vid, Jimmy DiResta builds a classic tool chest using traditional techniques but some fancy hinge hardware:


Core77

Design Experience That Matters: Video of Our Design Sprint

Last summer, with support from the Autodesk Foundation and Lenovo, we recruited a student design team to develop an alpha prototype of our Otter Newborn Warmer. Malory Johnson, Industrial Design Fellow, joined DtM from the Columbus College of Art & Design. Karan Chaitanya Mudgal, Industrial Design Fellow, joined DtM from NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Kristine Chen, Mechanical Engineering Design Fellow, is a recent graduate of Stanford University. To support the team on the research end, we also recruited Kristen Moulton, Clinical Fellow, a second-year medical school student who had previously worked as a Research Coordinator for the NIH.

Video first, description afterwards:

The summer design sprint started with a couple weeks of orientation at the DtM studio in Salem. This included a review of the project context and background,the product requirements and specifications and the existing CAD models and physical design concepts. The team then hit the road for a series of expert interviews, both at local neonatal intensive care units and with local manufacturers.

The team then dove into concept brainstorming, some hand-sketching and lots of CAD modeling in Fusion 360. In July, the team moved to the new Autodesk BUILD Space in South Boston for alpha prototype fabrication and testing. The Autodesk BUILD Space team were superlative hosts.

After a series of late nights and endless hours sawing, sanding and soldering, the team finished the Otter alpha prototype. It’s a huge step forward for our newborn warmer program. We’re excited to continue Otter development this Fall with a student design-for-manufacture team at Olin College, and to begin field-testing the device overseas later this year.

Student design team lead Malory Johnson, who moonlights as a video producer, put together this fantastic two-minute speed-run through the summer design sprint.


Core77

Design Job: Super Heady! Kiva Confections is Seeking a Graphic/Brand Designer in Oakland, CA

COMPANY DESCRIPTION KIVA Confections is the leading producer of artisanal, cannabis infused confectionary products in the United States and is one of the most recognized and preferred brands in the burgeoning medical marijuana and adult use cannabis industry. JOB DESCRIPTION

View the full design job here
Core77

Design Job: All Fun and Games! Big Monster Toys is Seeking an Industrial Designer in Chicago, IL

Are you a creative designer who has always wanted to make toys and games? Self motivated? Up to speed with Rhino, Solidworks, and the Adobe Suite? If so, Big Monster Toys has a place for you. We started making toys, games, and infant gear in the same

View the full design job here
Core77

Design Job: Calling All Brandits! Ptarmak is Seeking a Senior Graphic Designer in Portland, OR

We are a packaging designery of thinkers and doers. We build brands and create packaging for some of the best companies around, delivering worthy products to the world at large. We are looking for a Portland based senior level graphic designer to join our team. Our designers turn strategic dreams

View the full design job here
Core77