Tag Archives: design

Design Job: The Future is Bright! Oakley is Seeking a Senior CAD Modeler in Orange County, CA

Surfacing, surfacing… surfacing. You’re so good you can make a square look like a circle, a circle like a convex pentagon and the pentagon look like Lemmy. Yes, we love Motorhead! Creo is your tool of choice but you can jam with Alias when needed.

View the full design job here
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Design Job: The Future is Bright! Oakley is Seeking a Senior CAD Modeler in Orange County, CA

Surfacing, surfacing… surfacing. You’re so good you can make a square look like a circle, a circle like a convex pentagon and the pentagon look like Lemmy. Yes, we love Motorhead! Creo is your tool of choice but you can jam with Alias when needed.

View the full design job here
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Design Job: Blast Off! Bigelow Aerospace is Seeking an Industrial Designer in North Las Vegas, NV

U.S. Citizens and Permanents Residents Only Many applicants apply; please only apply for this position if you meet the minimum qualifications. INDUSTRIAL DESIGNER Graduate to Intermediate Job Description: Responsibilities and Qualifications • Proficiency with 3D modeling and drafting

View the full design job here
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Design Experience that Matters: Lessons Learned in Rapid Prototyping

The process of prototype fabrication is really a series of problem-solving exercises. Slot A suddenly refuses to accept Tab B, the beautiful CAD model reveals monstrous qualities when it emerges from the 3D printer, the Arduino code refuses to compile. We always find ourselves doing lots of just-in-time self-education, reading product manuals and watching YouTube HOWTO videos.

In brief, here are some of the most valuable lessons learned from our summer design sprint:

Vacuum Forming Polycarbonate

So many bubbles!  This bassinet is meant to be transparent.

Vacuum-forming clear quarter-inch thick polycarbonate sheets isn’t for amateurs! We milled molds out of stacked sheets of MDF (medium-density fiberboard), both to accommodate the limited z-height of the ShopBot CNC and to machine vacuum-channels in the middle layers. Before vacuum-forming, we had to bake the heavy polycarbonate sheets and the mold in a brick oven, or else it would develop thousands of little bubbles that made the material cloudy (see above). Unfortunately, the MDF molds took a beating from the hot polycarbonate, and after a few pulls, the polycarbonate started tearing chunks out of the mold. No mold lasts forever–even the hardened steel tools that LEGO uses for injection molding eventually wear out. Next time, we might skip MDF and instead cut a tool from the more expensive but more robust renshape.

Cleaning 3D Printed Parts

Parts from the 3D printer often come out of the machine with scratchy surfaces or other imperfections, for example marks left by the “raft” or other support material. We’ve learned that if you plan to sand the part to make it smooth and more aesthetically appealing, you are essentially committing to covering the sanded part with bondo and finishing paint. Sanded parts, especially those made from light-colored PLA, just seem to magnetically attract grubbiness. It might be skin oil from handling, smudgy whatever from dirty surfaces, but the part soon looks dingy. If you don’t have the time to sand, bondo, prime and paint, we recommend you remove the unwanted material with a chisel, blade or other scraper rather than sandpaper.

Working With Nichrome Wire

Enter the bare metal butt crimp

The Otter prototype was an opportunity to learn a lot about nichrome heating wire. Here’s the challenge: you want to establish an electrical connection with a wire that immediately heats up when you introduce a current. Soldering this kind of wire won’t work (solder melts when it gets hot). Automotive crimp connectors, which have plastic housings, don’t work (think: melting plastic). In the end, we learned that the best connectors involve mechanical clamping, for example a bare metal butt crimp (which sounds like an awesome band name), or a screw terminal.

Powering Arduino With A Buck Converter

We’ve powered countless little Arduino projects either (1) directly from the computer through a USB cable, (2) with a rechargeable lithium cellphone powerpack and a USB-B connector (Arduino Uno) or micro-USB connector (Arduino Micro), or (3) a 5V alkaline battery pack wired to the Vin pin.

For the Otter prototype, we needed the Arduino to control a relay that was sending 24V to the heater wires. It was easy to generate 24V using an off-the-shelf AC adapter power supply, but how could we also get 5V to power the Arduino without using a second power supply? Enter the humble and amazing buck converter–an inexpensive component that can efficiently generate an output of 3-12V given a 24V input. Presumably this is old hat to any electrical engineer. There exist countless varieties of “DC/DC step-down” or buck converters (ie Adafruit), so you ought to be able to find one that’s a perfect match for your project.

Cloud-Based CAD File Sharing

Autodesk’s cloud-based CAD server, called A360 (aka the web interface for Fusion360), is an amazing collaboration tool. We were able to generate CAD models on the big ThinkStation P910 desktop machines in the DtM studio, and then instantly open the same files on our ThinkPad P50 laptops when we were working at the CNC machine. Hooray for a cloud-storage system that actually works as advertised!

DON’T SHAVE THAT YAK!

Any kind of production rush can easily devolve into fun adventures in “yak shaving“: you were supposed to be testing the prototype thermal control system, and two hours later you find yourself wandering the aisles at Home Depot in search of T-handled allen wrenches.

HOWTO replace a lightbulb

_____________________________________

This “Design Experience that Matters” series is provided courtesy of Timothy Prestero and the team at Design that Matters (DtM). As a nonprofit, DtM collaborates with leading social entrepreneurs and hundreds of volunteers to design new medical technologies for the poor in developing countries. DtM’s Firefly infant phototherapy device is treating thousands of newborns in 21 counties from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In 2012, DtM was named the winner of the National Design Award.


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Design Job: Hello Kitty! Sanrio, Inc. is Seeking a Creative Director in El Segundo, CA

Job Description/Duties: Define and drive Sanrio’s overall Creative vision while maximizing Brand integrity. Establish Company’s Creative philosophy, objectives and strategy and create cohesion and synergy for the Company. Provide strong Creative direction and leadership. • Must have multifaceted creative leadership experience with Brand image,

View the full design job here
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“Let’s Talk About Design:” Chris Salomone’s Furniture Design Crits

Design crits, at least the way they were delivered when I was in design school, were tricky things to execute. When looking at any project, the professor needed to evaluate whether the student had followed the assignment, deduce the student’s intent, contextualize the design, identify strengths and weaknesses, and offer helpful advice or criticism on how to improve. There was also the minefield of what is and isn’t subjective to navigate.

Chris Salomone is one of the designer/builders we feature in our Weekly Makers Roundup, and while he’s not a professor of design, he’s got both an innate sense of style and a good grasp of the art of the crit. He’s started doing a new series called “Let’s Talk About Design” whereby viewers send in their project plans for evaluation. I thought Salomone’s advice, subjectivity aside, was both helpful and insightful:

While the video’s only around four minutes, I actually appreciate the brevity; how grueling were some of those marathon grillings we received at school?


Core77

“Let’s Talk About Design:” Chris Salomone’s Furniture Design Crits

Design crits, at least the way they were delivered when I was in design school, were tricky things to execute. When looking at any project, the professor needed to evaluate whether the student had followed the assignment, deduce the student’s intent, contextualize the design, identify strengths and weaknesses, and offer helpful advice or criticism on how to improve. There was also the minefield of what is and isn’t subjective to navigate.

Chris Salomone is one of the designer/builders we feature in our Weekly Makers Roundup, and while he’s not a professor of design, he’s got both an innate sense of style and a good grasp of the art of the crit. He’s started doing a new series called “Let’s Talk About Design” whereby viewers send in their project plans for evaluation. I thought Salomone’s advice, subjectivity aside, was both helpful and insightful:

While the video’s only around four minutes, I actually appreciate the brevity; how grueling were some of those marathon grillings we received at school?


Core77

Design Job: Turn It Up! Bose is Seeking a UX Design Technologist in Westborough, MA

The Product Communications & Design department at Bose is looking for a passionate UX Design Technologist looking to create new and compelling digital experiences. Our creative group creates customer-facing communications for site, social and online advertising building brand affinity and educating consumers about new products. The ideal candidate is a

View the full design job here
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Design Experience that Matters: Handy Tools for Working With 3D Printers

Here at Design that Matters we do a lot of 3D printing, so we’ve built up this collection of handy but inexpensive tools for supporting our 3D printers. They live in IKEA silverware caddies mounted next to the machines and they just make the work go easier.

1. Super Lube synthetic grease for the build plate lead screw (the lube supplied with most machines gets used up quickly). A single tube of lube lasts for ages. 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Cheap cutting pliers for trimming PLA spools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Metal feeler gauge for consistent results when manually leveling the printer build plate (Makerbot Rep2 works best when the 0.2mm gauge just fits between nozzle and build plate).

 

 

 

  

4. UHU glue stick for securing prints to build plate (useful even with heated build plates). This works better and is more convenient than covering the build plate with blue painter’s tape.  

 

 

 

 

5. Window scraper for removing glue residue and stubborn PLA deposits from build plate. 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Cricut craft spatula for un-sticking prints. We’ll create a little gap under the print with the window scraper, and then lever the rest of the print off the build plate with the craft spatula.  Bonus: we’re less likely to stab ourselves. 

 

 

 

 

7. iFixit metal spudgers for scraping off and digging out printed support material and other defects.

 

 

 

 

  

8. Cheap dental picks for removing support material from internal cavities.

 

 

 

 

 

9. Steel tweezers for getting gunk off the extruder nozzle without melting fingers.

 

 

 

  

 

10. We also have a couple self-healing cutting mats taped to the table next to the machine so we can fuss around with scrapers without scarring the tabletops or damaging the build plates. 

 

 

 

 

A Few More Items:

We’ve mounted an appropriate set of Allen wrenches on a 3D-printed bracket attached to every machine. 

To reduce filament-jams in our oldest machine, the trusty Replicator 2, we printed and mounted this filament guide from Thingiverse on the back of the machine:

Image by FERDYP

For storing PLA, we were delighted to discover that even the big Makerbot-brand spools fit perfectly inside a standard 5-gallon bucket. To prevent humidity from spoiling the PLA, we snap a Gamma Seal Lid on top of the bucket and throw in a handful of silica gel desiccant packs before we screw it shut.

Stay Tuned!

After a productive four years with our Makerbot Replicator 2 (and a frustrating two years with our Makerbot Replicator Gen5), we just upgraded to a Lulzbot Taz 6.  We’ve started experimenting with new filament materials and a heated printer bed.  

We find that glue sticks are still useful for first-layer adhesion, although for exotic materials like nylon some consider generic PVP-based glue sticks more effective than UHU sticks. We still prefer the combination of the window scraper and the spatula for unsticking prints. The new filament spools also fit in our airtight 5-gallon buckets for storage. The biggest change is that we no longer need the feeler gauge, given that the Lulzbot has a self-leveling bed.

Do You Have Any Tips for Us?

We’re still learning how to get the best results from our 3D printers for the least amount of effort. Some machines create rafts (print bases) that are tedious to remove. Although we’ve had success sanding parts with paper or a Dremel, the resulting smooth parts very quickly look grubby (something about dust and oil getting into the seams). For high-quality aesthetic models, we haven’t found an alternative to the laborious process of: bondo, sand, primer, paint, clear-coat. Have any of you come up with a better solution?

_____________________________________

This “Design Experience that Matters” series is provided courtesy of Timothy Prestero and the team at Design that Matters (DtM). As a nonprofit, DtM collaborates with leading social entrepreneurs and hundreds of volunteers to design new medical technologies for the poor in developing countries. DtM’s Firefly infant phototherapy device is treating thousands of newborns in 21 counties from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In 2012, DtM was named the winner of the National Design Award.


Core77

Design Experience that Matters: Handy Tools for Working With 3D Printers

Here at Design that Matters we do a lot of 3D printing, so we’ve built up this collection of handy but inexpensive tools for supporting our 3D printers. They live in IKEA silverware caddies mounted next to the machines and they just make the work go easier.

1. Super Lube synthetic grease for the build plate lead screw (the lube supplied with most machines gets used up quickly). A single tube of lube lasts for ages. 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Cheap cutting pliers for trimming PLA spools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Metal feeler gauge for consistent results when manually leveling the printer build plate (Makerbot Rep2 works best when the 0.2mm gauge just fits between nozzle and build plate).

 

 

 

  

4. UHU glue stick for securing prints to build plate (useful even with heated build plates). This works better and is more convenient than covering the build plate with blue painter’s tape.  

 

 

 

 

5. Window scraper for removing glue residue and stubborn PLA deposits from build plate. 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Cricut craft spatula for un-sticking prints. We’ll create a little gap under the print with the window scraper, and then lever the rest of the print off the build plate with the craft spatula.  Bonus: we’re less likely to stab ourselves. 

 

 

 

 

7. iFixit metal spudgers for scraping off and digging out printed support material and other defects.

 

 

 

 

  

8. Cheap dental picks for removing support material from internal cavities.

 

 

 

 

 

9. Steel tweezers for getting gunk off the extruder nozzle without melting fingers.

 

 

 

  

 

10. We also have a couple self-healing cutting mats taped to the table next to the machine so we can fuss around with scrapers without scarring the tabletops or damaging the build plates. 

 

 

 

 

A Few More Items:

We’ve mounted an appropriate set of Allen wrenches on a 3D-printed bracket attached to every machine. 

To reduce filament-jams in our oldest machine, the trusty Replicator 2, we printed and mounted this filament guide from Thingiverse on the back of the machine:

Image by FERDYP

For storing PLA, we were delighted to discover that even the big Makerbot-brand spools fit perfectly inside a standard 5-gallon bucket. To prevent humidity from spoiling the PLA, we snap a Gamma Seal Lid on top of the bucket and throw in a handful of silica gel desiccant packs before we screw it shut.

Stay Tuned!

After a productive four years with our Makerbot Replicator 2 (and a frustrating two years with our Makerbot Replicator Gen5), we just upgraded to a Lulzbot Taz 6.  We’ve started experimenting with new filament materials and a heated printer bed.  

We find that glue sticks are still useful for first-layer adhesion, although for exotic materials like nylon some consider generic PVP-based glue sticks more effective than UHU sticks. We still prefer the combination of the window scraper and the spatula for unsticking prints. The new filament spools also fit in our airtight 5-gallon buckets for storage. The biggest change is that we no longer need the feeler gauge, given that the Lulzbot has a self-leveling bed.

Do You Have Any Tips for Us?

We’re still learning how to get the best results from our 3D printers for the least amount of effort. Some machines create rafts (print bases) that are tedious to remove. Although we’ve had success sanding parts with paper or a Dremel, the resulting smooth parts very quickly look grubby (something about dust and oil getting into the seams). For high-quality aesthetic models, we haven’t found an alternative to the laborious process of: bondo, sand, primer, paint, clear-coat. Have any of you come up with a better solution?

_____________________________________

This “Design Experience that Matters” series is provided courtesy of Timothy Prestero and the team at Design that Matters (DtM). As a nonprofit, DtM collaborates with leading social entrepreneurs and hundreds of volunteers to design new medical technologies for the poor in developing countries. DtM’s Firefly infant phototherapy device is treating thousands of newborns in 21 counties from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In 2012, DtM was named the winner of the National Design Award.


Core77

Gyroscopic Pool Tables for Cruise Ships, Lighting Design by Minotaurs, Vacuum Hypocrisy & More

Seasick 8-Ball

“Self-stabilizing pool table on a cruise ship.”

Minotaur Lighting Design

“The shadow from this mounted Bulls head looks like it has a human body.”

[source]

Compensating for Typical Vending Machine Design

“These breath mints are taped to playing cards so they can be dispensed properly.”

[source

Layout Determined By Politics

“My university library has cnn on the far left and fox news on the far right.”

[source]

Tool Hack

“I didn’t have a caulk gun so I had to improvise”

[source]

One of These Things Sucks More Than the Other

“This lady cleaning with a vacuum at an iRobot shop.”

[source]

Birds Attracted to Cheap Prices

“Nothing to see here, just a Costco employee silently hunting a pigeon”

[source]

Mail the Force Be With You

“My neighbors mailbox”

[source]

Superior Toaster Interface Design

“My toaster has a button for when you need your toast done ‘a bit more'”

[source]


Core77

Gyroscopic Pool Tables for Cruise Ships, Lighting Design by Minotaurs, Vacuum Hypocrisy & More

Seasick 8-Ball

“Self-stabilizing pool table on a cruise ship.”

Minotaur Lighting Design

“The shadow from this mounted Bulls head looks like it has a human body.”

[source]

Compensating for Typical Vending Machine Design

“These breath mints are taped to playing cards so they can be dispensed properly.”

[source

Layout Determined By Politics

“My university library has cnn on the far left and fox news on the far right.”

[source]

Tool Hack

“I didn’t have a caulk gun so I had to improvise”

[source]

One of These Things Sucks More Than the Other

“This lady cleaning with a vacuum at an iRobot shop.”

[source]

Birds Attracted to Cheap Prices

“Nothing to see here, just a Costco employee silently hunting a pigeon”

[source]

Mail the Force Be With You

“My neighbors mailbox”

[source]

Superior Toaster Interface Design

“My toaster has a button for when you need your toast done ‘a bit more'”

[source]


Core77

Gyroscopic Pool Tables for Cruise Ships, Lighting Design by Minotaurs, Vacuum Hypocrisy & More

Seasick 8-Ball

“Self-stabilizing pool table on a cruise ship.”

Minotaur Lighting Design

“The shadow from this mounted Bulls head looks like it has a human body.”

[source]

Compensating for Typical Vending Machine Design

“These breath mints are taped to playing cards so they can be dispensed properly.”

[source

Layout Determined By Politics

“My university library has cnn on the far left and fox news on the far right.”

[source]

Tool Hack

“I didn’t have a caulk gun so I had to improvise”

[source]

One of These Things Sucks More Than the Other

“This lady cleaning with a vacuum at an iRobot shop.”

[source]

Birds Attracted to Cheap Prices

“Nothing to see here, just a Costco employee silently hunting a pigeon”

[source]

Mail the Force Be With You

“My neighbors mailbox”

[source]

Superior Toaster Interface Design

“My toaster has a button for when you need your toast done ‘a bit more'”

[source]


Core77

Gyroscopic Pool Tables for Cruise Ships, Lighting Design by Minotaurs, Vacuum Hypocrisy & More

Seasick 8-Ball

“Self-stabilizing pool table on a cruise ship.”

Minotaur Lighting Design

“The shadow from this mounted Bulls head looks like it has a human body.”

[source]

Compensating for Typical Vending Machine Design

“These breath mints are taped to playing cards so they can be dispensed properly.”

[source

Layout Determined By Politics

“My university library has cnn on the far left and fox news on the far right.”

[source]

Tool Hack

“I didn’t have a caulk gun so I had to improvise”

[source]

One of These Things Sucks More Than the Other

“This lady cleaning with a vacuum at an iRobot shop.”

[source]

Birds Attracted to Cheap Prices

“Nothing to see here, just a Costco employee silently hunting a pigeon”

[source]

Mail the Force Be With You

“My neighbors mailbox”

[source]

Superior Toaster Interface Design

“My toaster has a button for when you need your toast done ‘a bit more'”

[source]


Core77

Design Job: Good Design is Good Business! IBM Design is Seeking a Visual-Information Designer in Austin, TX

This position can be located in the following locations: Austin, TX, Cambridge, MA or San Francisco, CA Visual-Information Design: Works with and contributes to the evolution of a brand guideline or visual-information language system to translate the intended user experience to act

View the full design job here
Core77

Design Job: Hit it Out of the Park! Populous is Seeking a Senior Graphic Designer in Kansas City, MO

POPULOUS is a global architecture and design firm that creates the places where people love to be together, like Yankee Stadium, the London Olympics, and the Super Bowl. Over the last 30 years, the firm has designed more than 2,500 projects worth $ 40 billion across emerging and established markets. Populous’

View the full design job here
Core77

Rain’s Weekly Design Minutiae: Environmental Disaster, Neatly Packaged

I ordered two items from Staples and they arrived today. Here they are, the boxes laid on a grid of inches for scale.

Inside the first box are paper towels that fit the dispenser in my photo studio. The box is perfectly sized to the amount of paper towels within, there’s not a wasted inch.

Opening the second box, we see a strip of plastic air pockets…

…protecting the cargo within.

Below is the amount of materials required to ship me this SR44 battery for my digital calipers.

The battery is small enough that I could swallow it but the box it came in is larger than my head.

So why is it packaged this way, because Staples loves wasting cardboard and plastic? No. Either they or whomever they’ve subcontracted their fulfillment out to undoubtedly has some warehouse system in place, a series of pickers, packagers, conveyor belts, automatic labelers, scanning machines and vehicle-loading infrastructure, that is designed to handle cardboard boxes of sizes common to the majority of their wares.

At some point a Staples bean counter undoubtedly realized that the above-depicted scenario would take place. And realized that because of the scale that they’re operating at, it doesn’t matter. With their expensive and efficient systems in place, it would cost them more money to have someone pop the battery in a small padded envelope, write my address on it with a Bic pen, slap a couple stamps on it and walk it over to a U.S.P.S. mailbox. And their protocols prevent them from opening the paper towel box, dropping the battery in there and taping the box back up.

I’m sure they’ve figured out the macro stuff, and that their system is somehow the least wasteful when viewed from 10,000 feet. At least, that’s what I want to believe. It’s just hard to swallow that wasting this much material in this individual case is somehow logical.


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