Tag Archives: Cutting

The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 4: Laser Cutting, Plastic Welding

Here in Part 4, the prototype of the mobile solar charging platform starts to take shape. Industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, shows us the tricks of the trade:

– Using a laser cutter on the styrene forms that he vacuum-formed last time, he’s able to get precise shapes in a compound-curved surface

– When cutting out parts that don’t require an entire sheet of material, he uses the opportunity to cut extra test parts out of the extra material

– The versatility of styrene, which he’s even able to fashion hinges out of

– The benefits of wet sanding, and the importance of sanding blocks

– How to solvent-weld plastic with great precision

Check it out:


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The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 4: Laser Cutting, Plastic Welding

Here in Part 4, the prototype of the mobile solar charging platform starts to take shape. Industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, shows us the tricks of the trade:

– Using a laser cutter on the styrene forms that he vacuum-formed last time, he’s able to get precise shapes in a compound-curved surface

– When cutting out parts that don’t require an entire sheet of material, he uses the opportunity to cut extra test parts out of the extra material

– The versatility of styrene, which he’s even able to fashion hinges out of

– The benefits of wet sanding, and the importance of sanding blocks

– How to solvent-weld plastic with great precision

Check it out:


Core77

The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 4: Laser Cutting, Plastic Welding

Here in Part 4, the prototype of the mobile solar charging platform starts to take shape. Industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, shows us the tricks of the trade:

– Using a laser cutter on the styrene forms that he vacuum-formed last time, he’s able to get precise shapes in a compound-curved surface

– When cutting out parts that don’t require an entire sheet of material, he uses the opportunity to cut extra test parts out of the extra material

– The versatility of styrene, which he’s even able to fashion hinges out of

– The benefits of wet sanding, and the importance of sanding blocks

– How to solvent-weld plastic with great precision

Check it out:


Core77

An Upside-Down Drawer Design, a Bicycle Cargo Sidecar, Working with Sheet Metal, Cutting PVC Using Paper & More

Drone Accident

Improvisational problem solving from La Fabrique DIY here, who need to perform a quick rescue mission following a (bloodless) drone accident:

Working With Sheetmetal

Not all of us have access to a sheet metal brake, but if you have no experience with sheet metal and are curious how to work it, this video by the Samurai Carpenter is worth a watch. As someone who’s cut (and ruined the edge of) sheet metal using snips, I had no idea that you could cut it instead with a freaking utility knife!

Simple Tool Handle

By his own account Bob Clagett doesn’t have much experience with lathes, so here he’s learning on the fly as he creates a tool handle:

Concrete LED Light Cube

A multimaterial project from Linn from Darbin Orvar, who creates a Lexan, concrete and LED accent light:

Bicycle Sidecar

Laura Kampf continues modifying her bicycle, this time creating a kind of cargo sidecar that can haul lumber or her trusty pooch:

Making An Upside-Down Drawer For Band Saw Blade Storage

Last week John Heisz made an unusual vertical folding drawer. This week he makes an unusual upside-down drawer for storing bandsaw blades:

Four Homemade Drill-Powered Tools

We’ve saved the nuttiest for last. The aptly-named Crazy PT creates four homemade tools powered by a cordless drill, including a paper cut-off wheel that can slice through PVC and a DIY handheld vacuum:


Core77

An Upside-Down Drawer Design, a Bicycle Cargo Sidecar, Working with Sheet Metal, Cutting PVC Using Paper & More

Drone Accident

Improvisational problem solving from La Fabrique DIY here, who need to perform a quick rescue mission following a (bloodless) drone accident:

Working With Sheetmetal

Not all of us have access to a sheet metal brake, but if you have no experience with sheet metal and are curious how to work it, this video by the Samurai Carpenter is worth a watch. As someone who’s cut (and ruined the edge of) sheet metal using snips, I had no idea that you could cut it instead with a freaking utility knife!

Simple Tool Handle

By his own account Bob Clagett doesn’t have much experience with lathes, so here he’s learning on the fly as he creates a tool handle:

Concrete LED Light Cube

A multimaterial project from Linn from Darbin Orvar, who creates a Lexan, concrete and LED accent light:

Bicycle Sidecar

Laura Kampf continues modifying her bicycle, this time creating a kind of cargo sidecar that can haul lumber or her trusty pooch:

Making An Upside-Down Drawer For Band Saw Blade Storage

Last week John Heisz made an unusual vertical folding drawer. This week he makes an unusual upside-down drawer for storing bandsaw blades:

Four Homemade Drill-Powered Tools

We’ve saved the nuttiest for last. The aptly-named Crazy PT creates four homemade tools powered by a cordless drill, including a paper cut-off wheel that can slice through PVC and a DIY handheld vacuum:


Core77

An Upside-Down Drawer Design, a Bicycle Cargo Sidecar, Working with Sheet Metal, Cutting PVC Using Paper & More

Drone Accident

Improvisational problem solving from La Fabrique DIY here, who need to perform a quick rescue mission following a (bloodless) drone accident:

Working With Sheetmetal

Not all of us have access to a sheet metal brake, but if you have no experience with sheet metal and are curious how to work it, this video by the Samurai Carpenter is worth a watch. As someone who’s cut (and ruined the edge of) sheet metal using snips, I had no idea that you could cut it instead with a freaking utility knife!

Simple Tool Handle

By his own account Bob Clagett doesn’t have much experience with lathes, so here he’s learning on the fly as he creates a tool handle:

Concrete LED Light Cube

A multimaterial project from Linn from Darbin Orvar, who creates a Lexan, concrete and LED accent light:

Bicycle Sidecar

Laura Kampf continues modifying her bicycle, this time creating a kind of cargo sidecar that can haul lumber or her trusty pooch:

Making An Upside-Down Drawer For Band Saw Blade Storage

Last week John Heisz made an unusual vertical folding drawer. This week he makes an unusual upside-down drawer for storing bandsaw blades:

Four Homemade Drill-Powered Tools

We’ve saved the nuttiest for last. The aptly-named Crazy PT creates four homemade tools powered by a cordless drill, including a paper cut-off wheel that can slice through PVC and a DIY handheld vacuum:


Core77

An Upside-Down Drawer Design, a Bicycle Cargo Sidecar, Working with Sheet Metal, Cutting PVC Using Paper & More

Drone Accident

Improvisational problem solving from La Fabrique DIY here, who need to perform a quick rescue mission following a (bloodless) drone accident:

Working With Sheetmetal

Not all of us have access to a sheet metal brake, but if you have no experience with sheet metal and are curious how to work it, this video by the Samurai Carpenter is worth a watch. As someone who’s cut (and ruined the edge of) sheet metal using snips, I had no idea that you could cut it instead with a freaking utility knife!

Simple Tool Handle

By his own account Bob Clagett doesn’t have much experience with lathes, so here he’s learning on the fly as he creates a tool handle:

Concrete LED Light Cube

A multimaterial project from Linn from Darbin Orvar, who creates a Lexan, concrete and LED accent light:

Bicycle Sidecar

Laura Kampf continues modifying her bicycle, this time creating a kind of cargo sidecar that can haul lumber or her trusty pooch:

Making An Upside-Down Drawer For Band Saw Blade Storage

Last week John Heisz made an unusual vertical folding drawer. This week he makes an unusual upside-down drawer for storing bandsaw blades:

Four Homemade Drill-Powered Tools

We’ve saved the nuttiest for last. The aptly-named Crazy PT creates four homemade tools powered by a cordless drill, including a paper cut-off wheel that can slice through PVC and a DIY handheld vacuum:


Core77

An Upside-Down Drawer Design, a Bicycle Cargo Sidecar, Working with Sheet Metal, Cutting PVC Using Paper & More

Drone Accident

Improvisational problem solving from La Fabrique DIY here, who need to perform a quick rescue mission following a (bloodless) drone accident:

Working With Sheetmetal

Not all of us have access to a sheet metal brake, but if you have no experience with sheet metal and are curious how to work it, this video by the Samurai Carpenter is worth a watch. As someone who’s cut (and ruined the edge of) sheet metal using snips, I had no idea that you could cut it instead with a freaking utility knife!

Simple Tool Handle

By his own account Bob Clagett doesn’t have much experience with lathes, so here he’s learning on the fly as he creates a tool handle:

Concrete LED Light Cube

A multimaterial project from Linn from Darbin Orvar, who creates a Lexan, concrete and LED accent light:

Bicycle Sidecar

Laura Kampf continues modifying her bicycle, this time creating a kind of cargo sidecar that can haul lumber or her trusty pooch:

Making An Upside-Down Drawer For Band Saw Blade Storage

Last week John Heisz made an unusual vertical folding drawer. This week he makes an unusual upside-down drawer for storing bandsaw blades:

Four Homemade Drill-Powered Tools

We’ve saved the nuttiest for last. The aptly-named Crazy PT creates four homemade tools powered by a cordless drill, including a paper cut-off wheel that can slice through PVC and a DIY handheld vacuum:


Core77

An Upside-Down Drawer Design, a Bicycle Cargo Sidecar, Working with Sheet Metal, Cutting PVC Using Paper & More

Drone Accident

Improvisational problem solving from La Fabrique DIY here, who need to perform a quick rescue mission following a (bloodless) drone accident:

Working With Sheetmetal

Not all of us have access to a sheet metal brake, but if you have no experience with sheet metal and are curious how to work it, this video by the Samurai Carpenter is worth a watch. As someone who’s cut (and ruined the edge of) sheet metal using snips, I had no idea that you could cut it instead with a freaking utility knife!

Simple Tool Handle

By his own account Bob Clagett doesn’t have much experience with lathes, so here he’s learning on the fly as he creates a tool handle:

Concrete LED Light Cube

A multimaterial project from Linn from Darbin Orvar, who creates a Lexan, concrete and LED accent light:

Bicycle Sidecar

Laura Kampf continues modifying her bicycle, this time creating a kind of cargo sidecar that can haul lumber or her trusty pooch:

Making An Upside-Down Drawer For Band Saw Blade Storage

Last week John Heisz made an unusual vertical folding drawer. This week he makes an unusual upside-down drawer for storing bandsaw blades:

Four Homemade Drill-Powered Tools

We’ve saved the nuttiest for last. The aptly-named Crazy PT creates four homemade tools powered by a cordless drill, including a paper cut-off wheel that can slice through PVC and a DIY handheld vacuum:


Core77

An Upside-Down Drawer Design, a Bicycle Cargo Sidecar, Working with Sheet Metal, Cutting PVC Using Paper & More

Drone Accident

Improvisational problem solving from La Fabrique DIY here, who need to perform a quick rescue mission following a (bloodless) drone accident:

Working With Sheetmetal

Not all of us have access to a sheet metal brake, but if you have no experience with sheet metal and are curious how to work it, this video by the Samurai Carpenter is worth a watch. As someone who’s cut (and ruined the edge of) sheet metal using snips, I had no idea that you could cut it instead with a freaking utility knife!

Simple Tool Handle

By his own account Bob Clagett doesn’t have much experience with lathes, so here he’s learning on the fly as he creates a tool handle:

Concrete LED Light Cube

A multimaterial project from Linn from Darbin Orvar, who creates a Lexan, concrete and LED accent light:

Bicycle Sidecar

Laura Kampf continues modifying her bicycle, this time creating a kind of cargo sidecar that can haul lumber or her trusty pooch:

Making An Upside-Down Drawer For Band Saw Blade Storage

Last week John Heisz made an unusual vertical folding drawer. This week he makes an unusual upside-down drawer for storing bandsaw blades:

Four Homemade Drill-Powered Tools

We’ve saved the nuttiest for last. The aptly-named Crazy PT creates four homemade tools powered by a cordless drill, including a paper cut-off wheel that can slice through PVC and a DIY handheld vacuum:


Core77

An Upside-Down Drawer Design, a Bicycle Cargo Sidecar, Working with Sheet Metal, Cutting PVC Using Paper & More

Drone Accident

Improvisational problem solving from La Fabrique DIY here, who need to perform a quick rescue mission following a (bloodless) drone accident:

Working With Sheetmetal

Not all of us have access to a sheet metal brake, but if you have no experience with sheet metal and are curious how to work it, this video by the Samurai Carpenter is worth a watch. As someone who’s cut (and ruined the edge of) sheet metal using snips, I had no idea that you could cut it instead with a freaking utility knife!

Simple Tool Handle

By his own account Bob Clagett doesn’t have much experience with lathes, so here he’s learning on the fly as he creates a tool handle:

Concrete LED Light Cube

A multimaterial project from Linn from Darbin Orvar, who creates a Lexan, concrete and LED accent light:

Bicycle Sidecar

Laura Kampf continues modifying her bicycle, this time creating a kind of cargo sidecar that can haul lumber or her trusty pooch:

Making An Upside-Down Drawer For Band Saw Blade Storage

Last week John Heisz made an unusual vertical folding drawer. This week he makes an unusual upside-down drawer for storing bandsaw blades:

Four Homemade Drill-Powered Tools

We’ve saved the nuttiest for last. The aptly-named Crazy PT creates four homemade tools powered by a cordless drill, including a paper cut-off wheel that can slice through PVC and a DIY handheld vacuum:


Core77

An Upside-Down Drawer Design, a Bicycle Cargo Sidebar, Working with Sheet Metal, Cutting PVC Using Paper & More

Drone Accident

Improvisational problem solving from La Fabrique DIY here, who need to perform a quick rescue mission following a (bloodless) drone accident:

Working With Sheetmetal

Not all of us have access to a sheet metal brake, but if you have no experience with sheet metal and are curious how to work it, this video by the Samurai Carpenter is worth a watch. As someone who’s cut (and ruined the edge of) sheet metal using snips, I had no idea that you could cut it instead with a freaking utility knife!

Simple Tool Handle

By his own account Bob Clagett doesn’t have much experience with lathes, so here he’s learning on the fly as he creates a tool handle:

Concrete LED Light Cube

A multimaterial project from Linn from Darbin Orvar, who creates a Lexan, concrete and LED accent light:

Bicycle Sidecar

Laura Kampf continues modifying her bicycle, this time creating a kind of cargo sidecar that can haul lumber or her trusty pooch:

Making An Upside-Down Drawer For Band Saw Blade Storage

Last week John Heisz made an unusual vertical folding drawer. This week he makes an unusual upside-down drawer for storing bandsaw blades:

Four Homemade Drill-Powered Tools

We’ve saved the nuttiest for last. The aptly-named Crazy PT creates four homemade tools powered by a cordless drill, including a paper cut-off wheel that can slice through PVC and a DIY handheld vacuum:


Core77

Design Job: Live on the Cutting Edge of Design Research as a Junior Software Designer at IBM Design in Austin, TX

Welcome to the New Era of IBM Design. We are transforming the way IBM thinks. We are transforming the way IBM designs products. And we are transforming IBM’s culture. We are looking for talented and motivated designers to drive an era of design-led innovation.

View the full design job here
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How to Make a Shop Stool in 10 Minutes, Build a DIY BBQ Grill Stand and Transform Your Cutting Table Into a Coffee Table

Cutting Table to Coffee Table

This week Laura Kampf builds a very cool coffee table, using mortise-and-tenons for the joinery and what looks like a circular-saw-cutting underlayment for the top. To level off the kerf marks she fills them in with epoxy resin, killing the bubbles with a torch. Check it out:

Mobile Workstation

An entertaining fast-motion build from Jimmy DiResta this week, as he whips up a teacher’s workstation for a makerspace. It’s a lot of fun watching him install the locking mechanisms:

Make a Shop Stool in Ten Minutes

Jesse de Geest shows you his “cribbing ponies,” 2easy-to-make shop stools. Consisting of just two legs, two gussets and a top, you can whip these up out of cut-offs:

An Expensive Planer vs. a Cheap One

Here Matthias Wandel compares a (CAD)$ 200 planer versus a (CAD)$ 750 planer. He does a great job with sponsored content because he doesn’t pull any punches, really gets inside a machine to see what makes it tick, and shows you some real-world-usage details that many power tool reviewers would neglect to address.

Wood Turned Brick Bowl Fix

Wood movement being what it is, Frank Howarth turned a massive maple bowl three years ago and has been letting it dry ever since. With the bulk of its moisture finally shed, now he’s ready to turn it to final dimensions, and comes up with a novel way to replace some defects in the wood:

DIY Barbecue Grill Stand

With the weather getting nice barbecue season is nigh, and here Steve Ramsey shows us how he built the equivalent of a $ 100 grill stand for $ 40:

Building a Trash Can Enclosure, Part 1

An outdoor build from April Wilkerson this week, as she starts to build an enclosure for her trash cans using inexpensive materials. Here in Part 1, she puts up the framing and sheathing before the weather intervenes:

How To Flatten A Workbench Top With Hand Planes

How do you flatten something too large to run across the jointer? Using handplanes, of course. Here Jay Bates demonstrates the technique using a friend’s workbench:

Installing LED Shop Lighting

No build video from Linn/Darbin Orvar this week, just a basic one showing her installing ultra-bright lighting in her shop. It seems like a product plug, but if you’re looking to go LED in your own shop, these may be worth a look:

Lumber Cart for Vertical Wood Storage

Last time Sandra Powell whipped up some brackets to store wood horizontally. This week she builds a tall, narrow cart to store cut-offs vertically:


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Design Job: Remain Cutting Edge as a Sr Digital Design Sculptor at Designworks in LA

Candidates are expected to collaborate, conceptualize, and implement all needed criteria to transform and interpret complex design sketches, tapes and plans into virtual/computer 3D models, using 3D digital/computer modeling packages (Alias, Solidworks, CREO). Must have 5-7 years experience and Bachelor of Fine Arts or Vocational/Specialized Training in Digital Design Sculpting.

View the full design job here
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Design Problem: How Do You Design a Cutting Board for One-Handed Users?

As an untalented chef, I find accurately chopping vegetables to be a difficult and irritating task. But I have it easy in that I have two hands. For folks who only have the use of one hand, the task moves from irritating to impossible.

Design ought be able to help. One good idea for chopping lighter stuff like herbs is a mezzaluna:

If the base is heavy enough it won’t move, enabling the user to mince one-handed.

When it comes to cutting, slicing or peeling heavier stuff—say, apples, zucchinis or potatoes—a more involved solution is required. One example is the Etac Deluxe One-Handed Food Prep and Cutting Board:

Here we see two solutions. One is the T-track and the clamping plate, which obviously locks down with a cam clamp at the end of the lever. That’s fine if you’re slicing something large in half, but not so good for cutting repetitive narrow slices. The sharp vertical pins are meant to solve that, as the end user can impale a potato or the like in place, then repetitively chop down the length of it. The problem with the pins is that you may accidentally strike them with your knife, and the pins themselves provide a hazard when you’re handling the board (see video at the bottom of this entry).

Coroflotter and RISD grad Sichen Sun is working on her own design for a one-handed cutting board. During her research, she came across a one-handed woman’s DIY solution to the problem, that apparently uses rubber bands or some kind of long twist-ties:

Inspired, Sun first experimented with an alternate clamping method, first tackling the problem of how to hold irregularly-shaped items. Her initial mock-up solved this with a clamp that can be flipped around to present either a flat or concave surface to the work:

However, as with the other designs above, there was no provision for advancing the work after each cut. While the end user could put the knife down, undo the clamp, manually advance the ingredients and then re-clamp, Sun sought a more elegant solution. She then struck upon the idea of a rack-and-pinion arrangement:

The idea here is that the gear furthest from the user slides along a track and can be pulled towards the nearer gear, closing the gap until the material is clamped. The end user can then use their body to press against the butt end of the rack after each cut, which turns the gear and advances the ingredient being cut.

Sun’s concept is mechanically sound, but now requires the finessing that will make it practical; while I like that she started by considering how the end user could smoothly operate this design, the next step might be to figure out a way to replace the gears, or at least the exposed portion of them, so that they do not trap food and will not be tricky to clean.

Does anyone have any ideas? Before sounding off you may want to watch JustAddGinger’s video below, where the hostess offers cooking tips and tools as part of her “One Handed Ways” series:


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Canadian Chef Designs the “Ultimate Cutting Board”

When it comes to newfangled cutting board designs, I’m a fan of the Mocubo, which we covered here. But there’s still plenty of room in this market for innovative designs, as evidenced by this Canadian design for the Ultimate Cutting Board:

While I’m not completely sold on this design, pledgers are, as the UCB has racked up nearly $ 100,000 at press time on a $ 37,449 goal. The first thing I wondered was whether the magnets are strong enough to draw the knife astray during fine chopping, or if you’re meant to avoid cutting near the split.

The second thing I thought is that the drop-in containers seem too small to actually be useful. 

Thirdly, something about having a seam in a cutting board bugs me, I feel like juices and whatnot would collect there during prep work.

However, I’m not a professional chef—and UCB developer Michael Motamedi is (he even competed on MasterChef Canada), so it’s safe to assume that what he’s come up with is functional enough for those with true kitchen skills.

If you’re looking to pick up one of the USD $ 124 UCBs, you’d better hurry—at press time there was just four days left.


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Glowforge: Democratizing Laser Cutting with an Inexpensive, Easy to Use Machine

For many would-be makers, there are barriers aplenty that can keep one from realizing one’s dreams. One of the first barriers is not having access to the right tools—the welding rig, 3D printer, laser cutter etc. that you need for your project—or the know-how to work one. But thankfully companies like Glowforge are ready to step in and become barrier removers, by designing better, cheaper tools that are easier to use than their forebears.

Glowforge is currently democratizing laser cutting by designing an affordable, easy-to-use laser cutter/printer that takes clever advantage of software. By integrating affordable smartphone cameras linked to software, their machine enables you to do things like draw directly on your part and have the laser trace-cut it (once you’ve removed your hand, naturally). The hassles of part alignment are all done on the screen of your smart device, rather than on the physical bed of the machine, giving you a WYSIWYG interface that reduces errors. And they reckon that their eponymous machine can rival a $ 10,000-plus laser cutter, but for just under two grand.

Personalized hardwood skin for Macbook Pro / Print Time: 19min / Material Cost: $ 9.00
Plywood iPhone stand / Print Time: 42min / Material Cost: $ 12.00
Walnut veneer Macbook keyboard caps / Print Time: 33min / Material Cost: $ 12.00
Stacked contrasting pen holder / Print Time: 29min / Material Cost: $ 8.00
Engraved glass spice jars / Print Time: 9min / Material Cost: $ 10.00
Kip leather custom satchel / Print Time: 133min / Material Cost: $ 58.00

Take a look at some of the things they’ve produced:

Check out how easy this looks to use:

Here’s a more in-depth video, for those of you interested in the technology behind it, and some of the early successes that drove company founder Dan Shapiro to develop the machine:

For the next 26 days, they’re taking pre-orders for the machine at an astonishing 50% off (i.e. the $ 4,000 model is going for $ 1,995), with shipping scheduled for December of this year. Demand is apparently strong: In the four days since the sale began, they’d racked up $ 3,052,002 in sales!


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