Tag Archives: classic

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Transferring the Design Language of Classic Game Consoles to Cars

Something like this should be an assignment at every industrial design program–and it was conceived of by a used car dealer in the UK. The imaginative folks over at Jennings Ford Direct have commissioned an unknown designer to render “8 Classic Game Consoles Redesigned as Cars,” whereby s/he essentially transfers the design language from one series of objects onto another:

Atari 2600

Atari brought the arcade experience to your home in the early 1980s. With its faux-wood panelling and chunky black chassis, you’ll be eager to flick that satisfying ‘On’ lever in our street level version.

NES

The NES car is inspired equally by the early Nintendo’s blocky 8-bit graphics and the boxy console itself. Just as the Nintendo Entertainment System took gaming from geek territory into family pastime, you’ll be able to fit the whole tribe into this one!

Sega Genesis/Megadrive

The Sega Genesis, or Megadrive as it was known outside of North America, dragged console culture into the 16-bit age. The machine that gave us Sonic the Hedgehog was a sleeker number than its predecessors. You’ll want to get its pacy automobile equivalent onto the open road to put it to the test.

Playstation 2

With a 128-bit, 294 Mhz Emotion Engine running under the hood, Sony’s breakthrough games machine is the godfather of 21st century consoles. Just one look at the powerful Playstation car will tell you that now we mean business.

Gamecube

Nintendo’s PS2-rival was a prettier machine both inside and out. The superior graphics of the games were matched by the elegant indigo box that powered them. The vehicular version is similarly elegant – and easy to park!

Game Boy Color

It’s funny to think that the graphics of handheld consoles used to be in black and white. Sega and Atari both beat Nintendo off the mark when it came to producing a color screen – but when the Game Boy Color arrived, its batteries had far better staying power. The Game Boy car, therefore, is a neat little runaround that’ll keep going as long as you need it.

Xbox 360

The Xbox 360 introduced console gaming as we know it today. With its superior graphics, built-in hard drive, DVD player, web access and usb ports, the machine is ready to communicate with the outside world. We reckon this makes the car version just about ‘driverless’-ready – and versatile enough for town, arena, and off-road.

Nintendo Switch

Finally consoles have gone truly mobile: the Switch is a powerful home console that you can pick up and play on the go. Naturally, its car version is a sporty 2-seater that looks like it’s ready for anything!

If you were an ID professor giving this assignment, what two object categories would you have your students connect? Assume that it’s an exercise and not practical. I’d like to see mid century modern superyachts, modernist farm tractors and Memphis-style exercise machines.


Core77

Incredibly Detailed Beauty And The Beast-Themed Wedding Photo Shoot Brings To Life The Disney Classic

An impressive Beauty and the Beast-themed wedding photo shoot has brought to life Disney’s romantic 1991 classic, which is getting a reboot this weekend with the release of a live-action version starring Emma Watson. The fairy tale-inspired affair included details that eagle-eyed fans will undoubtedly spot, such as a candelabra, a clock and a chipped teacup – nods to the enchanted characters Lumiere, Cogsworth and Chip, respectively. Photographer Raelyn Martellino even dyed her own used wedding dress to replicate Belle’s famous yellow gown.

More info: Raelyn Martellino (h/t: dailymail, huffingtonpost)

The invitations, meanwhile, proclaim ‘Be our guests’ – just like the hit performed by American actor Jerry Orbach and English actress Angela Lansbury in the 1991 movie.

“I already have brides asking me for inspiration,” Martellino told the Huffington Post. “I even have one who is planning a big Beauty and the Beast adult birthday party. I’m pretty sure we’ll be seeing all kinds of red roses, candelabras, tea cups, and clocks with arms this year. I’m hoping we’ll even see some yellow dresses!”










Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Design Job: Build Classic Holiday Products as Studio Next’s Plastics Fabricator in Minneapolis, MN

As a Plastics Fabricator at Studio Next, you will perform all tasks involved in the production of Party City point of purchase products. This includes bending, cutting, molding, sanding, assembling, packaging, machine set up, running and applying graphics or plastic graphic channels. Creating Vac Form Patterns and molds from solid models.

View the full design job here
Core77

This Artist Duo Uses Face As A Canvas To Recreate Famous Classic Paintings

1

Art has a different way of inspiring the audience, and for photographer Tatiana Jablonskaya and makeup artist Oksana Vinogradova, it inspired them to re-create paintings on a canvas they knows very well — on the face. The Belarus-based artists has taken classic paintings like Van Gogh’s “Starry Night”, Edvard Munch’s “The Scream”, Kazimir Malevich’s abstract paintings and transformed them into makeup masterpieces.

More info: Tatiana Jablonskaya, Oksana Vinogradova

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

This Artist Duo Uses Face As A Canvas To Recreate Famous Classic Paintings

1

Art has a different way of inspiring the audience, and for photographer Tatiana Jablonskaya and makeup artist Oksana Vinogradova, it inspired them to re-create paintings on a canvas they knows very well — on the face. The Belarus-based artists has taken classic paintings like Van Gogh’s “Starry Night”, Edvard Munch’s “The Scream”, Kazimir Malevich’s abstract paintings and transformed them into makeup masterpieces.

More info: Tatiana Jablonskaya, Oksana Vinogradova

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

What Paris banning pre-1997 cars means for classic owners

Filed under: ,

Officials explain that getting rid of old cars will reduce air pollution in the French capital.

Continue reading What Paris banning pre-1997 cars means for classic owners

What Paris banning pre-1997 cars means for classic owners originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 06 Jun 2016 11:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink |  Email this |  Comments
Autoblog

1985 Porsche 911 rally-style classic to be auctioned for good cause

Filed under: , , , , , , ,

This heavily modified, air-cooled Porsche 911 has been built as a tribute to Porsche’s legendary Safari models and is slated for auction on April 10.

Continue reading 1985 Porsche 911 rally-style classic to be auctioned for good cause

1985 Porsche 911 rally-style classic to be auctioned for good cause originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 04 Apr 2016 19:29:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | Email this | Comments
Autoblog

Classic Disney Characters Reimagined In The Beautifully Eerie Style Of Tim Burton

1

Artist and animator Andrew Tarusov recently posed a simple question: “What if Tim Burton directed all Disney classic movies?”

h/t: mymodernmet, buzzfeed

2

The Los Angeles-based creative answered his own query with a series of eerie illustrations that are a mashup of Disney’s iconic characters and Burton’s signature style. Tarusov’s whimsical works show just how drastic this change could be.

3

“I love Tim Burton’s style — how it looks vintage, stylish, and cute,” Tarusov told Buzzfeed. “Everything is made as a horror movie, but at the same time it’s not horror. It could be any genre.”

4
5
6
7
8
9
10


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

16 Classic Photos That Capture Nylon Stockings’ Allure In The 1940s And 1950s

0

Before the 1920s, stockings, if worn, were worn for warmth. In the 1920s, as hemlines of dresses rose, people began to wear stockings to cover the exposed legs. These stockings were sheer, first made of silk or rayon (then known as “artificial silk”), and after 1940 of nylon.

The introduction of nylon in 1939 by chemical company DuPont began a high demand for stockings in the United States with up to 4 million pairs being purchased in one day. Nylon stockings were cheap, durable, and sheer compared to their cotton and silk counterparts. When America entered World War II on December 11, 1941, DuPont ceased production of nylon stockings and retooled their factories to produce parachutes, airplane cords, and rope. This led to a mass shortage and creation of a black market for stockings. At the end of the war DuPont announced that the company would return to producing stockings but could not meet demand. This led to a series of disturbances in American stores labeled the nylon riots until DuPont was able to ramp up production.

h/t: vintag.es

Woman inspecting her nylon stockings, 1942
1
Thomas D. McAvoy—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

A model wearing “hotsies,” wool-lined silk faille girdle and bra, 1942
2
Gjon Mili—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

“Curtain” stockings, 1943
3
Walter Sanders—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

“Curtain” stockings, 1943
4
Walter Sanders—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Nylon stockings, 1945
5
Peter Stackpole—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Model wearing black stockings, fitted dress coat, fur trimmed hat and fur muff, adjusting garter, 1946
6
Gjon Mili—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Model with stockings, 1948
7
Peter Stackpole—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Lace stockings with panels that run to mid-calf and enhance slim ankles, 1948
8
Nina Leen—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Chorus girl Linda Lombard, resting her legs after a tough night on stage, 1949
9
George Silk—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Model wearing black nylon hose permanently attached to high heeled satin mules by Herbert Levine, 1950
10
Gjon Mili—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Dancer Mary Ellen Terry talking with her legs up in telephone booth, 1952
11
Gordon Parks—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Cancan dancers flinging up their legs while they dance in Paris, 1952
12
Nat Farbman—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Model wearing new stay-up stocking with elastic cord spiraling around thigh, 1954
13
Gjon Mili—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Teenage girls resting feet at a formal dance, 1954
14
Cornell Capa—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Stockings and garters, 1954
15
Gordon Parks—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

Scene at a beatnik night club, 1960
16
A. Y.—The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Hairstylist Paints Hair Into Classic Paintings

1
Starry Night by Van Gogh

Some haircuts are inspired by more than “I hate being bald and hats are expensive” sentiment. Ursula Goff, for example, gets her inspiration from classical paintings. Her color scheme roughly approximates the hues in Van Gogh’s Starry Night or Edward Munch’s The Scream. It’s amazing how you can see the resemblance just by the arrangement of colors.

h/t: boredpanda, demilked

2
The Scream by Edvard Munch

3
The Kiss by Gustav Klimt

4
Water Lilies by Claude Monet

5
Drowning Girl by Roy Lichtenstein

6
Red Canna Lily by Georgia O’Keeffe

7
Girl With a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer

8
Birth of Venus by Botticelli

9
Marilyn Monroe by Andy Warhol


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Which Classic Car Design Would You Revive?

Let’s have a bit of fun here: Given that it’s now easier to start up a replica car company in the U.S., let’s say that you had the funding to do it and unlimited licensing options. Which car design would you choose to revive? Remember that:

– Under the Low Volume Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Act, the design’s got to be more than 25 years old–and you’ll probably have to go further back than that to find a true design classic. (Can anyone think of a single U.S. marque that produced a lustworthy car in the ’80s and ’90s?)

– We’re assuming American designs; we’ll save the European designs for another entry

– You can assume modern underpinnings, technology and safety features, so don’t worry about the poor mileage, horrendous plate-glass windshields and drum brakes of the past

I’ll pick five to get you started:

1940 Cadillac Series 62 – Bohman & Schwartz

Designed by the legendary Harley Earl (and here with a custom body by the Bohman & Schwartz coachworks of the era), you can almost hear the swing music when you look at this thing. A fine example of streamlined design, the nose recalls a locomotive or the prow of a ship, while B & S have added a fanciful plunging beltline. This bad boy had enough room inside to seat six freaking adults.

1949 Buick Roadmaster

One of the transition vehicles, in my humble opinion, between the streamlined ’40s and the jet fighter ’50s design aesthetics. The absurdly chunky grill looked like it was made to chew the road up in its chrome teeth. The nonsensical but handsome “VentiPorts” on the side recalled a ship’s portholes, but were supposedly there to help ventilate the engine. This vehicle represents a time when American excess actually had aesthetic value.

1959 Chevy Impala

I had the good fortune to see one of these driving down the road once. I know the design doesn’t make any functional sense. I know it’s too much. I know the one in the photo has been lowered beyond what you got straight out of the factory. But when you see one of these things glide past you, you get a funny feeling in your stomach.

1963 Corvette Split-Window Coupe

I’ll always have a soft spot for the ’63 split window, because it was a function of manufacturing limitations. Designer Bob McLean wanted that crazy compound curve shape for the rear window and no one knew how to make it. So they split it in two, inconveniently placing a strip of metal obscuring the driver’s visibility. Today we could retrofit it with backup cameras and finally provide a perfectly unobstructed view.

1967 Pontiac GTO

To be honest, I don’t even find this car that attractive (though I think the single hood scoop on the ’65 and later models looks better than the dual ones on the original ’64). The reason I’d bring this car back is because it was symbolic of American auto design clearly moving in a new direction—the ’50s were never coming back. Sure, the muscle car design aesthetic eventually led the U.S. auto industry into ruin, but for the next few, all-too-brief years, we still had it.

Okay, your turn. Show us some good ones!


Core77