Tag Archives: browser

Vivaldi browser now packs a History feature to dig into your browsing habits

The latest version of the Vivaldi browser is out sporting a new History feature that’s unlike the same component in competing browsers. The new feature includes graphics, statistics, and a calandar-based view for easy tracking.

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Skype for Outlook.com preview launches in the UK, coming to the US soon

Skype for Outlookcom preview launches in the UK, coming to the US soon

Outlook.com’s 60 million-plus users will have another feature to take advantage of soon, as Skype is previewing built-in web access to its service. Currently available in the UK (headed to the US and Germany in “coming weeks,” — worldwide this summer) it lets users make calls directly from their inbox via a browser plugin available for Internet Explorer, Chrome and Firefox. Users with existing Skype accounts will also need to link their account to to the website which will allow their contacts to be merged, with the idea of having more choices of how to reach out to close contacts. Gmail’s added easy access to hangouts and even Facebook has integrated Skype-connected video into its messaging so we suppose it’s necessary for feature parity, with the added bonus of Skype’s large install base. There are two demo videos embedded after the break, or you can head to Skype’s blog for more details.

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Source: Skype Blog, Outlook Blog

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Skype for Outlook.com preview launches in the UK, coming to the US soon

New Chrome Beta extension from Google lets you view Office files directly in the browser

New Chrome Beta extension from Google lets you view Office files directly in the browser

One of the more unique features of Google’s web browser for Chromebooks has been the ability to open and view Microsoft Office files directly in the browser (as opposed to pushing them to Drive), but that’s so far remained confined to those devices. Google’s decided to change that today, though, releasing a new extension for Chrome Beta that allows the same functionality in the browser for Windows and Mac. There’s no indication yet as to when it will make it to the stable release of Chrome, but beta users can install the extension now at the source link below.

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Via: TechCrunch

Source: Chrome Web Store, Google Chrome Blog

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New Chrome Beta extension from Google lets you view Office files directly in the browser

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Google increases Chrome’s security, singles out shady browser extensions

DNP Google increases Chrome's security, singles out shady browser extensions

We know Google isn’t afraid to make it rain for the sake of Chrome’s security, but today’s provisions appear to be an inside job. Laying the smack down on toxic browser extensions, the company introduced a new set of security measures that label applications in violation of its safety guidelines as malware. These potential threats try to bypass the browser’s silent installation blockers by manipulating its management settings. Once installed, the malicious software is enabled by default and cannot be removed or disabled from within Chrome. Google cautions that within a week people will begin seeing download alerts when attempting to install an identified threat. In the meantime, we suggest you start making plans to check out your current extensions just to be sure your setup has a clean bill of health.

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Via: The Next Web

Source: Google Online Security Blog

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Google increases Chrome’s security, singles out shady browser extensions

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BitTorrent Surf plugin launches in beta on both Chrome and Firefox

BitTorrent Surf plugin launches in beta, available for both Chrome and Firefox

After four months in the alpha incubator, BitTorrent has released its Surf file-sharing plugin in beta not just for Chrome, its initial browser, but for Firefox as well. In an effort to make downloading and discovery easier, the new plugin has a status window for monitoring file progress plus a recommendation engine that’ll offer suggestions based on search terms. BitTorrent claims the results “prioritize legitimate content” and will “help creators and fans connect.” With ventures like SoShare, Sync and live-streaming in the works, this is yet another sign that a brand (arguably) once synonymous with illicit activities is at least trying to go legit.

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Source: BitTorrent (1), (2)

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BitTorrent Surf plugin launches in beta on both Chrome and Firefox

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Mozilla CEO talks Firefox OS release details, app ecosystems and carrier bloatware

Mozilla CEO talks openness, app ecosystems and carrier bloatware

Gary Kovacs, (current) CEO of Mozilla, just took the stage here at D:Dive Into Mobile 2013 in New York City. It’s apt to be his last major stage appearance before stepping aside in order to “go back to his roots,” as described here, and hosts Ina Fried and Walt Mossberg were on hand to grill him on ongoing developments before he heads for other pastures. To start, Walt asked why the browser needed to be the operating system on a phone. Kovacs’ reply?

“The browser doesn’t need to be the operating system; it needs to incorporate the web. Such that discovery is easy, such that multiple stores can be accessed from the device — so we aren’t locked in, or generally encouraged to be locked within a single ecosystem.”

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Mozilla CEO talks Firefox OS release details, app ecosystems and carrier bloatware

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Hiring Developers? Codassium Combines Collaborative Code Editing And Video Chat Into One Web App

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As just about any startup in the valley world could tell you, hiring good developers is one helluva process.

First you’ve gotta find the rare developer who isn’t already drowning in job offers. Then you’ve gotta sit down and chat ‘em up to make sure they’ll be a good fit for your team. Then you’ve gotta make sure they can actually, you know, code. All in all, the process can take weeks, with a dozen false starts along the way.

By combining a collaborative code editor with live video chat, Codassium makes the process a bit less painful.

While I personally find the idea of coding on-the-fly while someone I hope will give me lots of money stares at my face terrifying, it’s a pretty standard part of the developer interview process. Sometimes the interviewer will ask you to code out a bit of functionality with whatever language they use internally to gauge just how well you grok the nuances. Sometimes they’ll ask you how you might make a certain operation more efficient. Other times, they’ll just throw in a bit of broken code and say “Quick! Find the bug!” while sounding an air raid alarm and blasting a fire extinguisher in your face*.

Generally, this part of the process entails having the interviewee come into your office (which, in many cases, means flying them out to wherever you may be), or trying to juggle a video chat app like Skype alongside something like Collabedit. Codassium takes those two pieces of the puzzle, crams them together, and sticks them in one browser window.

Using Codassium is quite simple. You click one button to start a chat, give your browser permission to access your webcam, then share the unique URL with whoever else you want to join in on the conversation. I’m not sure if they’ve set a hard cap on how many people can be video chatting in one room at once, but I was able to cram in 6 talking heads before I ran out of room onscreen.

Codassium is built with Google’s rather awesome (if a bit nascent) WebRTC framework. The upside: that means the video chat works without Flash or any other third-party plugin. The downside: it also means that it currently only works in Chrome (or a pretty recent nightly build of Firefox).

While Codassium isn’t quite as fully featured as something like Sublime Edit (it currently lacks support for tabs, for example), it has most of the basic bases covered. It handles tabs as you’d expect, and does syntax highlight for most of the major languages, from Python and Javascript to C++ and Objective-C.

While I don’t see myself leading any developer interviews anytime soon (I’m a half-way decent coder, if I do say so myself, but we’ve got people waaaaay more suited for that task here at TC), I like it for a totally different reason. I recently took a bit of a hiatus from writing to brush up on a few rusty skills, coding included. I’m fortunate enough to have a few friends who are way better coders than I am, and they were often willing to lend a hand whenever I’d get stuck trying to wrap my head around a particularly tough topic. This usually meant hopping on the phone and pasting bits of code back and forth over Skype, which was… not awesome. I would’ve loved to have had something like Codassium in my toolbox at the time.

Codassium is built by Wreally Studios, a small firm out of LA that just builds a lot of neat stuff. If you’re a journo or some other archetype that often finds themselves transcribing audio recordings, be sure to check out their audio player/notepad mashup app, Transcribe, as well.

[* I dont know if this actually happens, but I like to imagine that it does.]

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Hiring Developers? Codassium Combines Collaborative Code Editing And Video Chat Into One Web App

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Chrome Beta for Android adds fullscreen for phones, tab history on tablets

Chrome Beta for Android hits 27 adds fullscreen mode for phones, tab history on tablets

Chrome Beta for Android just hit version 27 today, delivering with it a few nice enhancements to what is already arguably the best mobile browser on the market. The two biggest tweaks are the ability to view your tab history on the tablet version by holding down the browser back button and the addition of a fullscreen mode on the phone. Scrolling down to make the address bar disappear on a handset is a extremely welcome change. A lack of fullscreen browsing was one of the few quirks of Chrome that occasionally had us contemplating a return to the stock Android browser. There are a couple of other, less notable, tweaks such as support for client side certificates. The Omnibar will also now continue to display any search terms you enter, instead of the URL for the results. You can see the full change log at the source and download Chrome Beta for Android at the more coverage link.

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Source: Chrome Releases

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Chrome Beta for Android adds fullscreen for phones, tab history on tablets

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Firefox 20 official with a seamless download manager, private windows (video)

Some Firefox releases have more noticeable changes than others. We’d say that the newly finalized Firefox 20 is firmly in that first camp. The new release gives desktop users a Safari-like download manager that pops out from the toolbar, making it possible to check on a big download without anything so ungainly as a separate window. Also new are more refined approaches to private browsing that can open a new window (on the desktop) or tab (on Android) for those extra-personal, secretive… gift-shopping sessions, according to Mozilla. Whether or not you believe that euphemism, there’s no doubt that Android users receive their own specific treat through support for lower-end ARMv6 phones, including relative oldies like the HTC Legend and Samsung Galaxy Q. Hit the source links to stay current with Firefox, no matter how innocuous your intentions might be.Filed under: Internet, SoftwareCommentsVia: Mozilla BlogSource: Mozilla, Google Play

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Firefox 20 official with a seamless download manager, private windows (video)