Tag Archives: blade

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

The Blade Runner 2049 Set Design Is Officially Not Going To Suck

The newest Blade Runner 2049 trailer is out and the visuals are worth getting excited for. I promise we aren’t pivoting to a fan site for Ridley Scott adjacent projects, but good set design deserves as much love as we can throw at it. It’s not that I’m anti-CGI, but practical effects can still launch a movie from good to great. It’s why we still care about the first Blade Runner today.

I won’t dig into the new storyline pieces, I’m just thrilled to see solid visual callbacks to the 1982 original that feel cohesive and familiar enough to come through in a tight edit. Vaulted pyramidic buildings and crumbling edifices are dotted throughout, with enough clean futuristic interiors to keep novelty and surprise up. We’ll definitely get grit and apocalyptic tech and downtown lights and flying cars, along with gutted hopeless buildings to match our grizzled old friend Deckard and the future in general.

Production designer Dennis Gassner has some deeply atmospheric credits under his belt (Skyfall and Waterworld among them) and the dedication to world building really pops once you tune out the cops and gaze at the environments. 

Plenty has already been said about director Denis Villeneuve (of Arrival and Sicario fame) and cinematographer Roger Deakins (Hail, Caesar!, Sicario, and dozens of other incredibly shot classics). So let’s just marinate in some stills of the enormous practical effects that “overwhelmed” Ryan Gosling while filming, fantasize about their fabrication shop, and mark our calendars for October. 


Core77

A Reciprocating Saw Blade That’s Designed to Break

Recip saw blades are typically thrown out when the teeth near the tang become dull—even when the ones near the tip remain sharp and new. The traditional way around this was to make use of the saw’s adjustable shoe, which can shift cutting to a fresh set of teeth an inch or so out from the clamp that holds the tang.

Most of the wear on a blade occurs an inch or so out from the shoe.

But what do you do when your saw does not have an adjustable shoe or the blade is so long the shoe lacks the throw to bring all of the teeth into prime cutting position? 

A second tang is punched into the center of the body.

Someone at DeWalt asked that question and came up with the idea for the Breakaway Blade, which is punched through the body in such a way that a worn blade can be broken in two to expose a second tang.

A 9-inch blade being snapped in two. The piece on the left is essentially a new 6-inch blade.

With the second tang in the clamp, a fresh set of teeth can be used for cutting. The design is akin to that of the blade in a snap-blade utility knife.

A 6-inch blade snapped in two.

DeWalt is not the first company to make a recip blade with more than one tang. Lenox makes an abrasive blade with tangs on either end. It works for that blade because with abrasive grit there is no direction of cut. Toothed blades cut on the in-stroke, so it wouldn’t work to put a tang on both ends.

Breakaway blades come in 6- and 9-inch lengths and are currently available for cutting metal: steel and copper pipe, conduit, metal studs, and the like. I doubt these will be adapted to wood-cutting applications because the opening through the center will weaken the blade and possibly cause it to kink if it binds. Binding is less of a problem with cutting metal than it is with wood. Also, it’s possible to cut wood and drywall without the shoe against the work—making it easier to use more of the teeth. It’s harder to do this with metal.

It makes sense DeWalt would be the company to come up with this design. Why? Because most recip saws have adjustable shoes but many of DeWalt’s do not. The availability of the Breakaway Blade makes up for the lack of that feature. And the ability to “start new” with a partially worn blade would be of value to those whose saws have adjustable shoes by allowing them to utilize even more teeth than before.


Core77

A Reciprocating Saw Blade That’s Designed to Break

Recip saw blades are typically thrown out when the teeth near the tang become dull—even when the ones near the tip remain sharp and new. The traditional way around this was to make use of the saw’s adjustable shoe, which can shift cutting to a fresh set of teeth an inch or so out from the clamp that holds the tang.

Most of the wear on a blade occurs an inch or so out from the shoe.

But what do you do when your saw does not have an adjustable shoe or the blade is so long the shoe lacks the throw to bring all of the teeth into prime cutting position? 

A second tang is punched into the center of the body.

Someone at DeWalt asked that question and came up with the idea for the Breakaway Blade, which is punched through the body in such a way that a worn blade can be broken in two to expose a second tang.

A 9-inch blade being snapped in two. The piece on the left is essentially a new 6-inch blade.

With the second tang in the clamp, a fresh set of teeth can be used for cutting. The design is akin to that of the blade in a snap-blade utility knife.

A 6-inch blade snapped in two.

DeWalt is not the first company to make a recip blade with more than one tang. Lenox makes an abrasive blade with tangs on either end. It works for that blade because with abrasive grit there is no direction of cut. Toothed blades cut on the in-stroke, so it wouldn’t work to put a tang on both ends.

Breakaway blades come in 6- and 9-inch lengths and are currently available for cutting metal: steel and copper pipe, conduit, metal studs, and the like. I doubt these will be adapted to wood-cutting applications because the opening through the center will weaken the blade and possibly cause it to kink if it binds. Binding is less of a problem with cutting metal than it is with wood. Also, it’s possible to cut wood and drywall without the shoe against the work—making it easier to use more of the teeth. It’s harder to do this with metal.

It makes sense DeWalt would be the company to come up with this design. Why? Because most recip saws have adjustable shoes but many of DeWalt’s do not. The availability of the Breakaway Blade makes up for the lack of that feature. And the ability to “start new” with a partially worn blade would be of value to those whose saws have adjustable shoes by allowing them to utilize even more teeth than before.


Core77

A Reciprocating Saw Blade That’s Designed to Break

Recip saw blades are typically thrown out when the teeth near the tang become dull—even when the ones near the tip remain sharp and new. The traditional way around this was to make use of the saw’s adjustable shoe, which can shift cutting to a fresh set of teeth an inch or so out from the clamp that holds the tang.

Most of the wear on a blade occurs an inch or so out from the shoe.

But what do you do when your saw does not have an adjustable shoe or the blade is so long the shoe lacks the throw to bring all of the teeth into prime cutting position? 

A second tang is punched into the center of the body.

Someone at DeWalt asked that question and came up with the idea for the Breakaway Blade, which is punched through the body in such a way that a worn blade can be broken in two to expose a second tang.

A 9-inch blade being snapped in two. The piece on the left is essentially a new 6-inch blade.

With the second tang in the clamp, a fresh set of teeth can be used for cutting. The design is akin to that of the blade in a snap-blade utility knife.

A 6-inch blade snapped in two.

DeWalt is not the first company to make a recip blade with more than one tang. Lenox makes an abrasive blade with tangs on either end. It works for that blade because with abrasive grit there is no direction of cut. Toothed blades cut on the in-stroke, so it wouldn’t work to put a tang on both ends.

Breakaway blades come in 6- and 9-inch lengths and are currently available for cutting metal: steel and copper pipe, conduit, metal studs, and the like. I doubt these will be adapted to wood-cutting applications because the opening through the center will weaken the blade and possibly cause it to kink if it binds. Binding is less of a problem with cutting metal than it is with wood. Also, it’s possible to cut wood and drywall without the shoe against the work—making it easier to use more of the teeth. It’s harder to do this with metal.

It makes sense DeWalt would be the company to come up with this design. Why? Because most recip saws have adjustable shoes but many of DeWalt’s do not. The availability of the Breakaway Blade makes up for the lack of that feature. And the ability to “start new” with a partially worn blade would be of value to those whose saws have adjustable shoes by allowing them to utilize even more teeth than before.


Core77

A Sliding Camera Gantry, How NOT to Unfold a Bandsaw Blade, DIY Tool Comparisons & More

Here’s a special Part 3 to our Makers Roundup. Matthias Wandel visited John Heisz’s shop, and this bromance/rivalry yielded a lot of content:

Sliding Camera Gantry

This is a quick one of Wandel touring Heisz’s shop. Watch for the two parts in the middle and end where you see Heisz’s wicked, normally unseen sliding camera gantry:

Two Ways Not to Unfold a Bandsaw Blade!

Wandel and Heisz troll the safety trolls, with Wandel showing you how not to do this:

DIY Dovetailed Beam Compass

Wandel shows the features of his DIY beam compass design:

Looking Over John’s Homemade Bandsaw

Wandel points out some of the smart design features of Heisz’s homemade bandsaw:

Comparing Strip Sanders

Which is better? You decide

Homemade Clamp Rivalry

Here they improvise a clever way to test the strength of each of their clamp designs.

Box Joint Jig Rivalry

Wandel and Heisz breaking each other’s stones over their respective designs for tablesaw box joint jigs. Some of you may cringe but I found it funny:


Core77

A Sliding Camera Gantry, How NOT to Unfold a Bandsaw Blade, DIY Tool Comparisons & More

Here’s a special Part 3 to our Makers Roundup. Matthias Wandel visited John Heisz’s shop, and this bromance/rivalry yielded a lot of content:

Sliding Camera Gantry

This is a quick one of Wandel touring Heisz’s shop. Watch for the two parts in the middle and end where you see Heisz’s wicked, normally unseen sliding camera gantry:

Two Ways Not to Unfold a Bandsaw Blade!

Wandel and Heisz troll the safety trolls, with Wandel showing you how not to do this:

DIY Dovetailed Beam Compass

Wandel shows the features of his DIY beam compass design:

Looking Over John’s Homemade Bandsaw

Wandel points out some of the smart design features of Heisz’s homemade bandsaw:

Comparing Strip Sanders

Which is better? You decide

Homemade Clamp Rivalry

Here they improvise a clever way to test the strength of each of their clamp designs.

Box Joint Jig Rivalry

Wandel and Heisz breaking each other’s stones over their respective designs for tablesaw box joint jigs. Some of you may cringe but I found it funny:


Core77

A Sliding Camera Gantry, How NOT to Unfold a Bandsaw Blade, DIY Tool Comparisons & More

Here’s a special Part 3 to our Makers Roundup. Matthias Wandel visited John Heisz’s shop, and this bromance/rivalry yielded a lot of content:

Sliding Camera Gantry

This is a quick one of Wandel touring Heisz’s shop. Watch for the two parts in the middle and end where you see Heisz’s wicked, normally unseen sliding camera gantry:

Two Ways Not to Unfold a Bandsaw Blade!

Wandel and Heisz troll the safety trolls, with Wandel showing you how not to do this:

DIY Dovetailed Beam Compass

Wandel shows the features of his DIY beam compass design:

Looking Over John’s Homemade Bandsaw

Wandel points out some of the smart design features of Heisz’s homemade bandsaw:

Comparing Strip Sanders

Which is better? You decide

Homemade Clamp Rivalry

Here they improvise a clever way to test the strength of each of their clamp designs.

Box Joint Jig Rivalry

Wandel and Heisz breaking each other’s stones over their respective designs for tablesaw box joint jigs. Some of you may cringe but I found it funny:


Core77