Tag Archives: Been

Uncovering Tools That Haven’t Been Touched Since 1941

Hey readers, here’s Part 2 of the New Deal tool chest find (Part 1 is here) by guest writer Dr. James E. Price. Dr. Price is an anthropologist, archaeologist and an accomplished joiner. You’ll find his bio down at the bottom. He’s managed to acquire a toolbox, still filled with tools, originally issued by the U.S. Government in 1933 for the Civilian Conservation Corps (read our story on the CCC here). It’s a very rare find with great American historical significance.

The rest of the entry is in Price’s words, edited for length and clarity. The photos and captions below are his.

Dr. Price writes:

Each of the tools in the chest was numbered by a stamp or engraving on the tool itself and there is a numbered brass tack beside the place it goes in the chest. I promised you that I would feature the tools on this page one at a time and you can assist with the research of its manufacturer, the years it was offered, a picture of it in a period catalog, or any other information pertinent to each tool.

We start this evening with the claw hammer which is Number 32 and is secured in the top till by a brass spring clip. The manufacturer’s imprint is on one cheek of the hammer and the other side is stamped “USVA”. The latter stands for The US Veterans Administration. They were used at The VA Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri.

Thank you for sharing your knowledge about a tool if you have information on it.

The subject clawhammer is in the top till.
The imprint has been damaged but it appears to read, “C. OGDEN, NEW YORK”. The “C” is somewhat questionable.
You can see the original inventory number stamp, “32”, on the wooden handle right behind the head.
The other side of the hammer head is stamped, “USVA”.

Next I continued cleaning and stabilizing tools in the top till. Here I’ll show you the three little Stanley Hurwood screwdrivers and two awls. The three screwdrivers are on the upper left of the photo below, each one in a spring clip with their tips in slots in a piece of wood glued in the end of the till. They are each marked “26”. One of the awls, the one with a beech handle, marked “25” is above the screwdrivers and the other one with an ebonized handle, stamped, “48” is to the left of the hammer. All the tools in the top till are marked, “USVA”.

This is a closeup of the three Stanley Hurwood screwdrivers.
The words “STANLEY HURWOOD, PAT. APPL’D FOR” are stamped on the handle of each screwdriver. The handles appear to be rosewood.
This awl is stamped “25” and the handle is beech. In small letters the wood is stamped “BUCK MFG. CO.”
The upper awl has an ebonized handle with no manufacturing marks but is stamped “48”.

It is likely the tools were issued in 1933 or 1934 and probably never used after the beginning of WWII. The chest and its tools gives us an intimate view of what was needed by finish carpenters in those years. To my knowledge no other complete government-issued tool chest and its contents survived from The New Deal Era so this one is a unique cultural resource that demands careful preservation and study.

Hand-tool beginners who frequently ask what tools they need, take heed. If you assemble a set of tools of the functional types found in this chest, you will have enough tools to make lots of wonderful wooden things.

The photo below shows the back left corner of the bottom of the chest. Note the three gimlets resting in holes in an upright board and the block plane secured to that board with a leather strap.

The tools were rusty from being in the bottom of the chest. Tools in the three tills above this bottom tier are not nearly as rusty.
The block plane is a Stanley 220 and the blade has been hollow ground so it saw use. The japanning is near 100%. This photo shows the disassembled plane after cleaning. No attempt was made to remove stains remaining after the powder rust was removed.
The gimlets did not fare as well as the block plane. They had a rust encrustation on the steel bits. Once the rust was removed some pitting is evident. The handles are rosewood.
I was born December 28, 1944 and the chest and its tools are a decade older than me but probably ceased to be used right before I was born. Of course I had to try out the gimlets knowing that my hand was the next one to use them since they were put away in the bottom of the chest by the carpenter who last used them.
This is a photo of the gimlets and Stanley 220 block plane cleaned and stabilized before I returned them to their proper place in the bottom of the chest that has been their home for 80 years.
This photo shows the three gimlets and block plane back in the chest.
The New Deal Tool Chest and its tools are currently on public exhibition in the lobby of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways Headquarters in Van Buren, Missouri. The exhibit will go through October, 2017.
This is a photo of the top three tills and their contents on display by The ONSR Interpretative Division of this National Park.

Stay tuned as I go through the rest. As I continue to remove tools from the chest I’ll describe them after I have given them a light cleaning.

________________________________

Anthropologist and archaeologist Dr. James E. Price grew up watching his father make ax handles, gun ramrods, sassafras boat paddles, cedar turkey calls and furniture. His father taught him the art of joinery. “Woodworking was important on our Ozark farm. My family owned a small sawmill which produced lumber for use on the farm. We built buildings, repaired wagons, made furniture and boat paddles, and many other objects and structures of wood.”

Dr. Price, a sixth generation Ozark dweller, prizes the careful process of using hand tools to create objects that he sees as useful, functional art. “Without using any fossil fuel source, I can take a pile of boards and make them into an object of beauty. The tools are the instrument, and the piece becomes a kind of permanent music. If it doesn’t burn or blow away, it can last a thousand years—it will be impossible to pull apart.”


Core77

Uncovering Tools That Haven’t Been Touched Since 1941

Hey readers, here’s Part 2 of the New Deal tool chest find (Part 1 is here) by guest writer Dr. James E. Price. Dr. Price is an anthropologist, archaeologist and an accomplished joiner. You’ll find his bio down at the bottom. He’s managed to acquire a toolbox, still filled with tools, originally issued by the U.S. Government in 1933 for the Civilian Conservation Corps (read our story on the CCC here). It’s a very rare find with great American historical significance.

The rest of the entry is in Price’s words, edited for length and clarity. The photos and captions below are his.

Dr. Price writes:

Each of the tools in the chest was numbered by a stamp or engraving on the tool itself and there is a numbered brass tack beside the place it goes in the chest. I promised you that I would feature the tools on this page one at a time and you can assist with the research of its manufacturer, the years it was offered, a picture of it in a period catalog, or any other information pertinent to each tool.

We start this evening with the claw hammer which is Number 32 and is secured in the top till by a brass spring clip. The manufacturer’s imprint is on one cheek of the hammer and the other side is stamped “USVA”. The latter stands for The US Veterans Administration. They were used at The VA Hospital in St. Louis, Missouri.

Thank you for sharing your knowledge about a tool if you have information on it.

The subject clawhammer is in the top till.
The imprint has been damaged but it appears to read, “C. OGDEN, NEW YORK”. The “C” is somewhat questionable.
You can see the original inventory number stamp, “32”, on the wooden handle right behind the head.
The other side of the hammer head is stamped, “USVA”.

Next I continued cleaning and stabilizing tools in the top till. Here I’ll show you the three little Stanley Hurwood screwdrivers and two awls. The three screwdrivers are on the upper left of the photo below, each one in a spring clip with their tips in slots in a piece of wood glued in the end of the till. They are each marked “26”. One of the awls, the one with a beech handle, marked “25” is above the screwdrivers and the other one with an ebonized handle, stamped, “48” is to the left of the hammer. All the tools in the top till are marked, “USVA”.

This is a closeup of the three Stanley Hurwood screwdrivers.
The words “STANLEY HURWOOD, PAT. APPL’D FOR” are stamped on the handle of each screwdriver. The handles appear to be rosewood.
This awl is stamped “25” and the handle is beech. In small letters the wood is stamped “BUCK MFG. CO.”
The upper awl has an ebonized handle with no manufacturing marks but is stamped “48”.

It is likely the tools were issued in 1933 or 1934 and probably never used after the beginning of WWII. The chest and its tools gives us an intimate view of what was needed by finish carpenters in those years. To my knowledge no other complete government-issued tool chest and its contents survived from The New Deal Era so this one is a unique cultural resource that demands careful preservation and study.

Hand-tool beginners who frequently ask what tools they need, take heed. If you assemble a set of tools of the functional types found in this chest, you will have enough tools to make lots of wonderful wooden things.

The photo below shows the back left corner of the bottom of the chest. Note the three gimlets resting in holes in an upright board and the block plane secured to that board with a leather strap.

The tools were rusty from being in the bottom of the chest. Tools in the three tills above this bottom tier are not nearly as rusty.
The block plane is a Stanley 220 and the blade has been hollow ground so it saw use. The japanning is near 100%. This photo shows the disassembled plane after cleaning. No attempt was made to remove stains remaining after the powder rust was removed.
The gimlets did not fare as well as the block plane. They had a rust encrustation on the steel bits. Once the rust was removed some pitting is evident. The handles are rosewood.
I was born December 28, 1944 and the chest and its tools are a decade older than me but probably ceased to be used right before I was born. Of course I had to try out the gimlets knowing that my hand was the next one to use them since they were put away in the bottom of the chest by the carpenter who last used them.
This is a photo of the gimlets and Stanley 220 block plane cleaned and stabilized before I returned them to their proper place in the bottom of the chest that has been their home for 80 years.
This photo shows the three gimlets and block plane back in the chest.
The New Deal Tool Chest and its tools are currently on public exhibition in the lobby of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways Headquarters in Van Buren, Missouri. The exhibit will go through October, 2017.
This is a photo of the top three tills and their contents on display by The ONSR Interpretative Division of this National Park.

Stay tuned as I go through the rest. As I continue to remove tools from the chest I’ll describe them after I have given them a light cleaning.

________________________________

Anthropologist and archaeologist Dr. James E. Price grew up watching his father make ax handles, gun ramrods, sassafras boat paddles, cedar turkey calls and furniture. His father taught him the art of joinery. “Woodworking was important on our Ozark farm. My family owned a small sawmill which produced lumber for use on the farm. We built buildings, repaired wagons, made furniture and boat paddles, and many other objects and structures of wood.”

Dr. Price, a sixth generation Ozark dweller, prizes the careful process of using hand tools to create objects that he sees as useful, functional art. “Without using any fossil fuel source, I can take a pile of boards and make them into an object of beauty. The tools are the instrument, and the piece becomes a kind of permanent music. If it doesn’t burn or blow away, it can last a thousand years—it will be impossible to pull apart.”


Core77

Napoleon’s Veterans Have Been Brought To Life In Color

Monsieur Moret, 2nd Regiment, 1814-15:

Some of the earliest photographs of veterans on Earth are a series of 15 original sepia images of members of Napoleon’s army. They were taken in their advancing years in the 1850s and keep in mind that some of these men were born in the late 1700s.

More info: Facebook (h/t: boredpanda)

Sergeant Taria, Grenadiere de la Garde, 1809-1815:

The portraits measure 12″ tall by 10″ wide and are mounted on stiff card. At some point in the 20th century, the name of each veteran and his regiment was inscribed in pencil on the reverse of each photograph. The identity of the photographer is unknown, but the originals form a part of a collection held at the Brown University Library where you can see the entire collection.

Monsieur Loria 24th Mounted Chasseur Regiment Chevalier of the Legion of Honor:

Some are distorted visually, which is due to subject movement as exposure times for the era were far longer than today. However, a handful of the photographs are beautifully detailed and lend well to the art of colorization. Over 60 hours of work has gone into realizing these men in true color once again. All the pictures are colorized by My Colorful Past via the Brown University Library.

Monsieur Ducel Mameluke de la Garde, 1813-1815:

Grenadier Burg, 24th Regiment of the Guard, 1815:

Monsieur Dupont, Fourier for the 1st Hussar:

Quartermaster Fabry, 1st Hussars:

Monsieur Dreuse of 2nd Light Horse Lancers of the Guard, c. 1813-14:

Monsieur Maire 7th Hussars c. 1809-15:


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Napoleon’s Veterans Have Been Brought To Life In Color

Monsieur Moret, 2nd Regiment, 1814-15:

Some of the earliest photographs of veterans on Earth are a series of 15 original sepia images of members of Napoleon’s army. They were taken in their advancing years in the 1850s and keep in mind that some of these men were born in the late 1700s.

More info: Facebook (h/t: boredpanda)

Sergeant Taria, Grenadiere de la Garde, 1809-1815:

The portraits measure 12″ tall by 10″ wide and are mounted on stiff card. At some point in the 20th century, the name of each veteran and his regiment was inscribed in pencil on the reverse of each photograph. The identity of the photographer is unknown, but the originals form a part of a collection held at the Brown University Library where you can see the entire collection.

Monsieur Loria 24th Mounted Chasseur Regiment Chevalier of the Legion of Honor:

Some are distorted visually, which is due to subject movement as exposure times for the era were far longer than today. However, a handful of the photographs are beautifully detailed and lend well to the art of colorization. Over 60 hours of work has gone into realizing these men in true color once again. All the pictures are colorized by My Colorful Past via the Brown University Library.

Monsieur Ducel Mameluke de la Garde, 1813-1815:

Grenadier Burg, 24th Regiment of the Guard, 1815:

Monsieur Dupont, Fourier for the 1st Hussar:

Quartermaster Fabry, 1st Hussars:

Monsieur Dreuse of 2nd Light Horse Lancers of the Guard, c. 1813-14:

Monsieur Maire 7th Hussars c. 1809-15:


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

The Grand Tour’s test track near Swindon has been found

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It’s at an airbase that also houses 250,000 objects owned by the Science Museum of London.

Continue reading The Grand Tour’s test track near Swindon has been found

The Grand Tour’s test track near Swindon has been found originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 18 Nov 2016 17:17:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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California’s clean-vehicle rebate funds have been mostly given to the wealthy

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Have money, get money.

Continue reading California’s clean-vehicle rebate funds have been mostly given to the wealthy

California’s clean-vehicle rebate funds have been mostly given to the wealthy originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 10 Nov 2016 08:55:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Over a million hydrogen miles have already been driven in the US

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All these miles come from First Element’s True Zero stations.

Continue reading Over a million hydrogen miles have already been driven in the US

Over a million hydrogen miles have already been driven in the US originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 16 Aug 2016 17:31:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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12 Pictures That Anyone Who’s Been Pregnant Will Understand Perfectly

1

Pregnancy brings a new meaning to the life of every woman. It’s an unforgettable period of immense joy coupled with worry and excitement. Expectant mothers can talk for hours about all sorts of their pregnancy-related concerns like insomnia, proper nutrition, morning sickness, and many more. And if you’ve ever been pregnant, chances are you have lots of funny and touching stories to tell about how it feels when you have a little person growing inside you.

h/t: brightside

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Before Photoshop – 14 Historic Photos That Have Been Manipulated

0

Though photo manipulation has become more common in the age of digital cameras and image editing software, it actually dates back almost as far as the invention of photography. Gathered below is an overview of some of the more notable instances of photo manipulation in history. For recent years, an exhaustive inventory of every photo manipulation would be nearly impossible, so we focus here on the instances that have been most controversial or notorious, or ones that raise the most interesting ethical questions.

h/t: vintag.es, fourandsix, twistedsifter, nydailynews

Abraham Lincoln’s Head on John Calhoun’s Body, circa 1860

1
One of the most famous pictures of President Abraham Lincoln is as fact-based as the upcoming movie Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter. Lincoln’s head was placed atop South Carolina politician John Calhoun’s body in this 1860 photo. Interestingly enough, Calhoun died in 1850.

General Ulysses. S. Grant on a Horse in Front of Troops, circa 1864

2
Researchers at the Library of Congress uncovered this gem after extensive detective work. The image appears to show General Ulsses S. Grant in front of his troops at City Point, Virginia during the American Civil War. Investigation now shows the image to be made of three separate prints: (1) the head is taken from a portrait of Grant; (2) the horse and body are those of Major General Alexander M. Cook; and (3) the background is of Confederate prisoners captured at the battle of Fisher’s Hill, Virginia.

Kent State Massacre Fencepost Removal, 1970

3
In this Pulitzer Prize winning photograph by John Filo, we see Mary Ann Vecchio screaming as she kneels over the body of student Jeffrey Miller at Kent State University. The Kent State Shootings occurred when National Guardsmen had fired into a crowd of demonstrators, killing four and wounding nine. The photo originally featured a visually distracting fencepost behind Mary Ann Vecchio’s head, but this was removed by an unknown photo editor in the early 1970’s. The modified photo then was published in Life magazine and other publications.

General Sherman Posing with His Generals, circa 1865

4
In this famous photograph taken by Matthew Brady, General Sherman is seen posing with his generals. General Francis P. Blair (standing far right) was added to the photograph as he was not in attendance for that specific shot. His image was taken from the second photograph shown, which was taken during the same sitting.

Russian Premier Josef Stalin Airbrushes Out His Enemies, circa 1930

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Photo-editing wasn’t just limited to glorifying or adding to actual history, it has also been used to erase history as well. Russian Premier Josef Stalin was notorious for airbrushing people out of pictures when he no longer had use for them. In this example from 1930, a commissar is out of sight soon after being out of Stalin’s mind.

Mao Tse-tung Removes Po Ku, 1936

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Mao Tse-tung was equally vindictive once people proved to no longer be useful to his Communist regime in China. Po-Ku, once a trusted ally, was airbrushed out of this early photo of the Chinese leader in 1936.

Hitler Removes Joseph Goebbels, 1937

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Taking cues from other famous despots, German Fuhrer Adolf Hitler made propaganda whiz Joseph Goebbels disappear from this 1937 photo. Goebbels would remain Hitler’s most trusted advisor until they both committed suicide in the last days of World War II. The bottom photo shows Joseph Goebbels in the original photo on the right.

Canadian PM William Lyon Mackenzie King Removes King George VI, 1939

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Not all people were removed to erase history, as shown in this doctored photo of Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie with Queen Elizabeth from 1939. While running for re-election, Mackenzie must have thought he would be more electable if King George VI was removed from this picture when it was used for an election poster.

Russian Cosmonaut Grigoriy Nelyubov Removed, 1961

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The first humans to go into space were a team of Russian Cosmonauts in 1961. They originally were to be a nine person team that was reduced to eight after Grigoriy Nelyubov was removed from both the squad and their photo for what was termed misbehavior. The original photograph, bottom, shows all 9 Russian Cosmonauts who went into space in April 1961.

Benito Mussolini Removes Horse Handler, 1942

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Benito Mussolini didn’t want to look like he needed help atop a horse as he triumphantly raised a sword in the air, he had the horse handler removed from this 1942 photo (bottom).

Fidel Castro Removes Carlos Franqui, 1968

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Fidel Castro (r.) approved a Soviet intervention in Czechoslovakia in the summer of 1968 causing Carlos Franqui (bottom c.) to split with Castro’s regime. Castro then decided to split with any images including Franqui.

US Olympic Hockey Team Adds Missing Players, 1960

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In this rather obvious tampering, the faces of Bill Cleary (front row, third from left), Bob Cleary (middle row, far left), and John Mayasich (top row far left), are superimposed onto the bodies of Bob Dupuis, Larry Alm and Herb Brooks. It’s unclear why those players were selected as ‘replacements’. The US Olympic Hockey team defeated the Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia to win its first Olympic Gold Medal in Hockey.

Bottles and Cigarettes Removed from a Meeting Photo of Willy Brandt

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German Chancellor of West Germany, Willy Brandt met with Leonid Brezhnev, the First Secretary of the Commuist Party for drinks and smokes, which the original photo (bottom) portrays. When this image ran in the German press, the bottles and cigarettes were removed (top).

Watch Removed from WWII Russian Flag Raising Photograph, 1945

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The editor-in-chief of Russian Magazine Ogoniok, removed a soldier’s watch as they raised the soviet flag atop the German Reichstag building during WWII. The reason? If you look closely, the soldier has a watch on his other hand as well. This suggests that ‘looting’ may have occurred before this photo was taken.


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

There Has Been A Dead Cockroach In The Anthropology Building’s Stairwell For At Least Two Weeks. Some Enterprising Person Has Now Made Her A Little Shrine.

3rd December
1

A professor at Texas A&M University posted these photos to Facebook.

“There has been a dead cockroach in the Anthropology building’s stairwell for at least two weeks.. Some enterprising person has now made her a little shrine.”

4th December
2

“Interesting.”

Note the clip.

4th December
3

Later that day…

4th December
4

More tributes that afternoon. Some flowers and notes, coins, and a Band-Aid.

5th December
5

“There is a candle now and a little coffin for the carcass… And for the record, I had nothing to do with the genesis of this memorial.”

The tributes continue to flow. A lollipop, bottlecaps and a cigarette.

5th December
6

“Somebody built a funeral pyre.”

8th December
7

The Post-It on the wall reads,

“You were always there to say hello to me in the morning, Rosie! We will miss you.”

The sign above:

“Rosie the Roach will be with us until Tuesday, December 14th when a celebration of her life will be conducted. Food and drinks will be served in the main office during the afternoon.”

16th December
8

Rosie’s popularity grew, and she was allowed to lay in state for a while longer than originally anticipated.

More words: “Here lies Rosie, a free roach.”

A generous soul left a joint on the funeral pyre. Someone built a tiny cairn. Can’t identify the currencies of the paper monies left.

16th December
9

More testimonials and poetry.

10

“They cremated the roach this afternoon…”

Vale, Rosie. h/t: imgur


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Some Of Hollywood’s Most Beautiful Women Have Been Given A Shocking Bloody Make-Over To Highlight Domestic Violence

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Stars including Kim Kardashian, Kendall Jenner, Angelina Jolie, Miley Cyrus, Madonna, Gwyneth Paltrow and Emma Watson were made up to look like bruised and battered victims of domestic violence by artist and activist aleXsandro Palombo, for the No Women is Immune from Domestic Violence project.

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In the series of shocking images, Palombo aimed to persuade all victims of abuse to break the silence and raise awareness that no women is immune to abuse, even if you are a celebrity.

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Each of their (fake) battered faces have been plastered on posters with the same message: “Life can be a fairytale if you break the silence. No woman is immune from domestic abuse. #Stopviolenceagainstwomen.”

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Speaking about the campaign, which he has been sharing across social media, he said: “The biggest accomplice of violence is the silence, a silence which every year kills or causes permanent disability more than diseases or accidents.”

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“Domestic violence is a social cancer that knows no boundaries nor social status, it can affect anyone, whether you’re an ordinary person or a celebrity.”

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“To defeat him you need to use the antidote of culture by educating and raising awareness on Respect and Equality. Each of us has do their part to help increase awareness and to change things by any means.”

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The contemporary artist and activist is well-known for using his art to raise awareness about serious social and cultural issues.

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In light of the International Day for Elimination of Violence, Palombo decided to use his skills to depict some of the top celebrities of our time as battered victims.

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h/t: tmi.buzz


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Crazier Examples of What New York City’s “Taxi of Tomorrow” Could Have Been

It’s already been two years since Nissan’s NV200, aka the “Taxi of Tomorrow,” was meant to begin replacing New York City’s fleet. But uptake has apparently been slow, and I have yet to see the Gotham’s streets awash in them.

Maybe New York made a mistake in choosing the NV200. Maybe they’d have been better off taking a look at cartoonist/inventor Steven M. Johnson—the guy who did these wacky auto concepts—and his unsolicited ideas for the Taxi of Tomorrow competition, which seem to take actual reality into account. His work is below (captions his).

We all know what everyone’s NYC cabbie fantasy is. Why not enable it?

AGGRESSIVE TAXI: With a narrow front end and a whole body bumper, it means business!
AGGRESSIVE TAXI: On the street, it engages in brutal acts of pushing and crowding.

Miss the Crown Victorias, but like the convenience of the NV200s? In Johnson’s world, you could have it both ways:

TRUNCATE: This design shows a taxi that is only one step from being a Crown Victoria.
TRUNCATE: When the roof trunk is lowered, the taxi looks like a passenger sedan.

Taxis made for economic realities:

PAY WHAT YOU CAN AFFORD: Poverty stalks New York City, as elsewhere! The poor are willing to stand, as on a train or bus.

Sometimes the drivers are so bad, maybe it would be better not to be able to see the road from the passenger seats. And we could save some space to boot.

SMAXI: A Smart Car enlarged elevator-shoe style, that offers a space for backseat passengers.
SMAXI (detail): Rear passengers sit almost underneath the driver!

The NSFW taxi:

RELAXI: A taxi for sleeping, meditating or sex, paid for by the minute or hour.

Not all of the concepts are crazy, this automated taxi that can help prevent traffic jams seems pretty sensible:

TAXIPOD: Passengers are shown boarding a six-passenger cassette in this driverless taxi.
TAXIPOD: On the street, a herd of Taxipods self-organizes, moves and communicates in a cluster.

This last one is my absolute favorite:

BIKE TUNNEL TAXI: This taxi’s body creates a tunnel for bicyclists and motorcyclists.
BIKE TUNNEL: A flashing sign allows bikes to enter the tunnel, or warns of turning and stopping.

See more of Johnson’s work here.


Core77

A Look at What Apple’s Been Cooking

Apple announced several new products at their media event yesterday. We’ll start with the ones of most interest to the general consumer, the iPhone 6S and 6S Plus, which are pushing the UI boundaries with some new tricks.

As we’ve all grown used to swiping and tapping, we seem to have largely maxed out the capabilities of that interface. So in a bid to add more dimensionality–literally–to the way we interact with touchscreens, Apple has developed what they’re calling 3D Touch, which allows a more sophisticated level of interaction:

This is a signature Apple move, demonstrating their prowess at blending both the software and hardware design. But whether 3D Touch will work as well as demonstrated remains to be seen; if you ask me, Apple’s got hardware design down cold but has a long way to go before their software reaches the same quality.

On the tablet front, Apple finally announced the much-anticipated iPad Pro, with a screen size rivaling a proper laptop:

It is interesting (some might say silly) to see those two devices begin to converge, and we’re curious to see what consumer uptake looks like. While Apple has clearly put in the design work, it is the market who will answer the question: What is the functional difference between a laptop and a tablet, and how does each fit (or not fit) into my life?

I was impressed, by the way, by the magnetic-balls connection of the screen to the keyboard. No energy-sapping Bluetooth required.

The new Apple product most likely to excite working industrial designers is their physically smallest: The Apple Pencil.

How cool did that on-screen ruler feature look?

To be able to electronically draw on something close to the size of 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper is bound to be a boon for sketch-happy ID’ers. Well, sketch-happy ID’ers who don’t already have a Cintiq, and are willing to cough up $ 799 for the iPad Pro and $ 99 for the Pencil, that is. 

The new iPhones will ship later this month, while the iPad Pro and the Pencil will roll out in November.


Core77