Tag Archives: beautiful

Escape Into The Glass Rivers And Lakes Of These Beautiful Wood Tables

If getting lost in a coffee table sounds improbable, you may change your mind once you see these beautiful furnishings. Artist and designer Greg Klassen transforms reclaimed wood into mesmerizing works of art embedded with glass rivers and lakes. Klassen’s newest works include a variety of coffee tables of different sizes and shapes, as well as wall hangings.

More info: Greg Klassen (h/t: inhabitat, colossal)

“The collection is inspired by the exciting edges and vivid grains found in the trees sustainably taken from the banks of the Nooksack River that twists below my studio,” wrote Klassen.







DYT. Design is all around us.

Escape Into The Glass Rivers And Lakes Of These Beautiful Wood Tables

If getting lost in a coffee table sounds improbable, you may change your mind once you see these beautiful furnishings. Artist and designer Greg Klassen transforms reclaimed wood into mesmerizing works of art embedded with glass rivers and lakes. Klassen’s newest works include a variety of coffee tables of different sizes and shapes, as well as wall hangings.

More info: Greg Klassen (h/t: inhabitat, colossal)

“The collection is inspired by the exciting edges and vivid grains found in the trees sustainably taken from the banks of the Nooksack River that twists below my studio,” wrote Klassen.







DYT. Design is all around us.

Escape Into The Glass Rivers And Lakes Of These Beautiful Wood Tables

If getting lost in a coffee table sounds improbable, you may change your mind once you see these beautiful furnishings. Artist and designer Greg Klassen transforms reclaimed wood into mesmerizing works of art embedded with glass rivers and lakes. Klassen’s newest works include a variety of coffee tables of different sizes and shapes, as well as wall hangings.

More info: Greg Klassen (h/t: inhabitat, colossal)

“The collection is inspired by the exciting edges and vivid grains found in the trees sustainably taken from the banks of the Nooksack River that twists below my studio,” wrote Klassen.







DYT. Design is all around us.

Beautiful Portrait Photos Of Ziegfeld Follies Showgirls From The 1920s Taken By Alfred Cheney Johnston

Alfred Cheney Johnston (1885 – 1971) was a New York City-based photographer known for his portraits of Ziegfeld Follies showgirls as well as of actors and actresses from the worlds of stage and film.

h/t: vintag.es

Johnston was born into an affluent New York banking family, which subsequently moved to Mount Vernon, New York. Initially he studied painting and illustration at the National Academy of Design in New York, but after graduating in 1908, his subsequent efforts to earn a living as a portrait painter did not meet with success. Instead, reportedly at the suggestion of longtime family friend and famed illustrator Charles Dana Gibson, he started to employ the camera previously used to record his painting subjects as his basic creative medium.

In approximately 1917, Johnston was hired by famed New York City live-theater showman and producer Florenz Ziegfeld as a contracted photographer, and was affiliated with the Ziegfeld Follies for the next fifteen years or so. He photographed several hundred actresses and showgirls (mainly in New York City, and whether they were part of the Follies or not) during that time period.


























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These Beautiful Photos Of Subway Stations Will Transport You From Your Daily Commute

T-Centralen, Stockholm, Sewden

“Honestly, I’m just really obsessed with looking at photos of metros,” says Montreal-based photographer Chris Forsyth. The photography student at Montreal’s Dawson College has been documenting the unique interiors of the Canadian city’s 68 transit stations, which date to the 1960s, for nearly two years.

Mre info: Chris Forsyth, Instagram (h/t: atlasobscura)

Prague, Czech Republic

His work, he says, focuses on accentuating the design he finds most people could appreciate if they realized it were there.

“[I’m] just trying to bring out that overlooked beauty in the architecture that I find people tend to miss when they’re on their daily commute.”

Bahnhof Berlin Messe Nord/ICC

Forsyth recently took his Montreal Metro Project on the road, to European cities—Berlin, Munich, and Stockholm—to explore the hidden architectural splendor of their transit systems.

Sherbrooke (Montreal Metro)

Métro Fabre

Jarry station’s ceiling is an icon of Montreal’s metro.

Champ-de-Mars (Montreal Metro)

Sherbrooke (Montreal Metro)

Sherbrooke (Montreal Metro)

Metro De L’eglise

U-Bahn Station Fröttmaning

Marienplatz

Solna Centrum Tunnelbanestasjon

Acadie (Montreal Metro)

Square-Victoria-OACI


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

These Beautiful Photos Of Subway Stations Will Transport You From Your Daily Commute

T-Centralen, Stockholm, Sewden

“Honestly, I’m just really obsessed with looking at photos of metros,” says Montreal-based photographer Chris Forsyth. The photography student at Montreal’s Dawson College has been documenting the unique interiors of the Canadian city’s 68 transit stations, which date to the 1960s, for nearly two years.

Mre info: Chris Forsyth, Instagram (h/t: atlasobscura)

Prague, Czech Republic

His work, he says, focuses on accentuating the design he finds most people could appreciate if they realized it were there.

“[I’m] just trying to bring out that overlooked beauty in the architecture that I find people tend to miss when they’re on their daily commute.”

Bahnhof Berlin Messe Nord/ICC

Forsyth recently took his Montreal Metro Project on the road, to European cities—Berlin, Munich, and Stockholm—to explore the hidden architectural splendor of their transit systems.

Sherbrooke (Montreal Metro)

Métro Fabre

Jarry station’s ceiling is an icon of Montreal’s metro.

Champ-de-Mars (Montreal Metro)

Sherbrooke (Montreal Metro)

Sherbrooke (Montreal Metro)

Metro De L’eglise

U-Bahn Station Fröttmaning

Marienplatz

Solna Centrum Tunnelbanestasjon

Acadie (Montreal Metro)

Square-Victoria-OACI


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Beautiful Photos Of Cuba In 1954 That Looks Like A Country Of Freedom

Legendary German photographer Heinrich Heidersberger worked on a cruise ship, the MS Atlantic, in 1954. He took thousands of pictures of Americans sailing from New York to Havana — something Americans haven’t been allowed to do for almost 50 years.

More info: Heinrich Heidersberger, Spiegel (h/t: messynessychic)

An Italian friend convinced Heidersberger to join the cruise on the MS Atlantic in part so Heidersberger could teach him the relatively new art of color photography. The photos disappeared for decades but resurfaced in 2001. Heidersberger himself was impressed by how well the slides were preserved, and a series of prints are now on display in an exhibition called “MS Atlantic, New York – Cuba,” at Hamburg’s Kunstgut Gallery, through April 22.

For Europeans, it’s easy to forget that traveling to Cuba is taboo for Americans. But that hasn’t always been the case. Before Fidel Castro’s revolution in 1959, the Caribbean island was treated as a playground for America’s wealthy, rather like Europeans now treat Mallorca or the south of Portugal. But since the trade and travel embargos set by President Kennedy at the height of the Cold War, in the early ’60s, Cuba has been an illegal destination for Americans.



















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Beautiful Adventure Photography By Eric Bunting

Eric Bunting is a talented 25-year-old self-taught photographer from Minnesnowta, USA. Eric focuses on landscapes, travel, nature, portrait and lifestyle photography.

More info: Eric Bunting, Instagram, Facebook (h/t: photogrist)

“Exposed to the outdoors at an early age he fell in love with exploring every aspect of our natural world. He now strive to share his passion for the outdoors through his photography and adventures,” said Eric.

“There’s no better time than now. Don’t hesitate. Don’t wait. You never know what you may find,” he added.


















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Beautiful Slavic Folklore With Julia Galimova

Another photography event has happened in Russia with famous Russian models Julia Galimova and Ekaterina Soboleva. The photographer that made these amazing photos was Andrey Yakovlev and he did his best to display a beauty of Russian Slavic folklore with a help of his Art-director Lili Aleeva and hair Stylist Oxana Zavrzina. All in all we can say they did the right scene and the whole photography set really has that Slavic folkish touch to it. Enjoy these amazing photos and make sure to visit Slavic rural areas when you drop by because there’s a hidden beauties in them.

More info: Andrey Yakovlev & Lili Aleeva (h/t: slavforum)













Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Beautiful Slavic Folklore With Julia Galimova

Another photography event has happened in Russia with famous Russian models Julia Galimova and Ekaterina Soboleva. The photographer that made these amazing photos was Andrey Yakovlev and he did his best to display a beauty of Russian Slavic folklore with a help of his Art-director Lili Aleeva and hair Stylist Oxana Zavrzina. All in all we can say they did the right scene and the whole photography set really has that Slavic folkish touch to it. Enjoy these amazing photos and make sure to visit Slavic rural areas when you drop by because there’s a hidden beauties in them.

More info: Andrey Yakovlev & Lili Aleeva (h/t: slavforum)













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Miami Artist Renders Beautiful Persian Rugs With Acrylic And Ink

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Jason Seife, the Miami-based artist beautifully renders the exquisite patterns found on old Persian carpets using a combination of acrylic and ink. Along with familiar geometric motifs, Seife’s rugs feature colors you seldom find on heavy textiles.

More info: Instagram, The Robert Fontaine Gallery (h/t: designfaves)

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The Robert Fontaine Gallery writes, “What initially drew him to these works was not only the aesthetic but the dense history and meaning behind the imagery.”

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Beautiful New Zealand: Earth’s Mythical Islands

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Milford Sound, perhaps New Zealand’s most famous scenic location, was long overlooked by early sailors and explorers, who didn’t realise the narrow entrance concealed an enormous and beautiful interior. It wasn’t discovered by Europeans until 1812. Named the eighth “wonder of the world”, its actually one of the wettest places on Earth, with rainfall creating cascades of waterfalls, some reaching a 1,000m in length. (Photo by Tom Walker/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Tuatara hatch after one of the longest incubations of any reptile. Hatchlings clamber out from an underground egg chamber which their mother dug around 16 months ago. (Photo by Christina Karliczek/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Steep cliffs reaching heights of up to 130m define the coastlines of the Snares Islands, making it an arduous climb for the penguins that breed there. (Photo by Mark Macewen/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Snares penguins have carved out a labyrinth of well-trodden paths through the forest to their nest sites, creating the unique spectacle of streets of penguin commuters in what looks like a dwarf jungle. The gnarled trunks they walk under are unusual too as they belong to trees of the daisy family. (Photo by Mark MacEwen/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Glow-worms are the larvae of a species of fly called a fungus gnat. Up close, they are worm-like in appearance and use their lights to attract flying insects into a trap of sticky threads. (Photo by Alex Hasskerl/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Kea are the only true alpine parrots in the world and thrive as cunning opportunists in the freezing conditions of the Southern Alps. Kea are thought to have developed their wide array of food-finding strategies during the last great ice age, where they learned to adapt using their unusual powers of curiosity. (Photo by Tom Walker/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Nimble and agile climbers, stoats hunt by following their nose at any time, day or night, requiring nearly a quarter of their body weight in prey on a daily basis. Stoats were introduced to New Zealand in 1883, many coming from Lincolnshire in the UK. (Photo by Nick Easton/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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A kiwi lays an enormous egg which takes up about 20% of the mother’s body weight- a human baby takes up only 5% in comparison. The unique bird also has nostrils at the tip of its bill, enabling it to sniff out invertebrate prey underground. Around the same size and shape as a stout chicken, a kiwi is in fact related to the ostrich. (Photo by Screen Grab/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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The sole surviving member of an ancient lineage of reptiles which flourished on Earth during the Jurassic period, tuatara are uniquely specialised to the temperate climate of New Zealand. (Photo by Claire Thompson/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Named after its constant fizzing of carbon dioxide bubbles reminiscent of champagne, “Champagne pool” is one of New Zealand’s most well-known geothermal features. Despite it being 900 years old, it’s relatively young for a hot spring and gets its distinctive orange colour from toxic mineral sulphides. (Photo by Nick Easton/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Fantails are some of New Zealand’s smallest and most agile birds, surviving in some of the most toxic and corrosive environments in New Zealand. (Photo by Tom Walker/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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New Zealand’s sea lions are one of the rarest and most threatened sea lions in the world. In 1993, a single female nicknamed “Mum” recolonised the mainland after being absent there for the last 100 years. Now most of the mainland population are her direct descendants. (Photo by Christina Karliczek/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Sirocco is a kakapo, a large nocturnal parrot, who has his very own Facebook page with more than 170,000 likes. (Photo by Holly Wallace/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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This species of tusked weta can grow up to 3.6cm in length. In a land over-run with land-based predators, its ingenious strategy to escape danger has proved very useful. It jumps into water and can hold its breath for more than five minutes – enough time for predators to give up and move on. (Photo by Nick Easton/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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One of the highest-living buttercups in the world, this species is a scree-slope specialist which can only live at altitudes upwards of 1,500m. Specific to a few regions of the South Island, they bloom in the summer months. (Photo by BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Carnivorous and capable of sniffing out prey in their mossy forest homes, these snails feed mainly on earthworms. (Photo by James Reardon/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Pukeko chicks are raised in multi-parent families. Incubation of eggs is predominantly by the males, but all parents contribute to the care of young chicks. This can mean they hatch in a nest with up to 18 other siblings. (Photo by Nick Easton/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Giant weta are some of the heaviest insects in the world and a prehistoric speciality of New Zealand. They can weigh as much as a small bird. (Photo by Claire Thompson/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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New Zealand’s first sheep were set ashore by Captain Cook in 1773. At their peak in 1982, there were 22 sheep for every person in New Zealand. Nowadays, the numbers have fallen by a third and are now estimated at just over seven sheep per person. (Photo by Nick Easton/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Beautiful New Zealand: Earth’s Mythical Islands

1
Milford Sound, perhaps New Zealand’s most famous scenic location, was long overlooked by early sailors and explorers, who didn’t realise the narrow entrance concealed an enormous and beautiful interior. It wasn’t discovered by Europeans until 1812. Named the eighth “wonder of the world”, its actually one of the wettest places on Earth, with rainfall creating cascades of waterfalls, some reaching a 1,000m in length. (Photo by Tom Walker/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Tuatara hatch after one of the longest incubations of any reptile. Hatchlings clamber out from an underground egg chamber which their mother dug around 16 months ago. (Photo by Christina Karliczek/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Steep cliffs reaching heights of up to 130m define the coastlines of the Snares Islands, making it an arduous climb for the penguins that breed there. (Photo by Mark Macewen/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Snares penguins have carved out a labyrinth of well-trodden paths through the forest to their nest sites, creating the unique spectacle of streets of penguin commuters in what looks like a dwarf jungle. The gnarled trunks they walk under are unusual too as they belong to trees of the daisy family. (Photo by Mark MacEwen/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Glow-worms are the larvae of a species of fly called a fungus gnat. Up close, they are worm-like in appearance and use their lights to attract flying insects into a trap of sticky threads. (Photo by Alex Hasskerl/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Kea are the only true alpine parrots in the world and thrive as cunning opportunists in the freezing conditions of the Southern Alps. Kea are thought to have developed their wide array of food-finding strategies during the last great ice age, where they learned to adapt using their unusual powers of curiosity. (Photo by Tom Walker/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Nimble and agile climbers, stoats hunt by following their nose at any time, day or night, requiring nearly a quarter of their body weight in prey on a daily basis. Stoats were introduced to New Zealand in 1883, many coming from Lincolnshire in the UK. (Photo by Nick Easton/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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A kiwi lays an enormous egg which takes up about 20% of the mother’s body weight- a human baby takes up only 5% in comparison. The unique bird also has nostrils at the tip of its bill, enabling it to sniff out invertebrate prey underground. Around the same size and shape as a stout chicken, a kiwi is in fact related to the ostrich. (Photo by Screen Grab/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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The sole surviving member of an ancient lineage of reptiles which flourished on Earth during the Jurassic period, tuatara are uniquely specialised to the temperate climate of New Zealand. (Photo by Claire Thompson/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Named after its constant fizzing of carbon dioxide bubbles reminiscent of champagne, “Champagne pool” is one of New Zealand’s most well-known geothermal features. Despite it being 900 years old, it’s relatively young for a hot spring and gets its distinctive orange colour from toxic mineral sulphides. (Photo by Nick Easton/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Fantails are some of New Zealand’s smallest and most agile birds, surviving in some of the most toxic and corrosive environments in New Zealand. (Photo by Tom Walker/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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New Zealand’s sea lions are one of the rarest and most threatened sea lions in the world. In 1993, a single female nicknamed “Mum” recolonised the mainland after being absent there for the last 100 years. Now most of the mainland population are her direct descendants. (Photo by Christina Karliczek/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Sirocco is a kakapo, a large nocturnal parrot, who has his very own Facebook page with more than 170,000 likes. (Photo by Holly Wallace/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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This species of tusked weta can grow up to 3.6cm in length. In a land over-run with land-based predators, its ingenious strategy to escape danger has proved very useful. It jumps into water and can hold its breath for more than five minutes – enough time for predators to give up and move on. (Photo by Nick Easton/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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One of the highest-living buttercups in the world, this species is a scree-slope specialist which can only live at altitudes upwards of 1,500m. Specific to a few regions of the South Island, they bloom in the summer months. (Photo by BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Carnivorous and capable of sniffing out prey in their mossy forest homes, these snails feed mainly on earthworms. (Photo by James Reardon/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Pukeko chicks are raised in multi-parent families. Incubation of eggs is predominantly by the males, but all parents contribute to the care of young chicks. This can mean they hatch in a nest with up to 18 other siblings. (Photo by Nick Easton/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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Giant weta are some of the heaviest insects in the world and a prehistoric speciality of New Zealand. They can weigh as much as a small bird. (Photo by Claire Thompson/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)

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New Zealand’s first sheep were set ashore by Captain Cook in 1773. At their peak in 1982, there were 22 sheep for every person in New Zealand. Nowadays, the numbers have fallen by a third and are now estimated at just over seven sheep per person. (Photo by Nick Easton/BBC Pictures/The Guardian)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Beautiful Portraits Of Women During The Later 19th And Early 20th Centuries

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Constant Puyo, 1903

Pictorialism, an approach to photography that emphasizes beauty of subject matter, tonality, and composition rather than the documentation of reality. The Pictorialist perspective was born in the late 1860s and held sway through the first decade of the 20th century. It approached the camera as a tool that, like the paintbrush and chisel, could be used to make an artistic statement. Thus photographs could have aesthetic value and be linked to the world of art expression.

h/t: vintag.es

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Constant Puyo, Apparition, 1910

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Constant Puyo, 1896

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Constant Puyo, 1896

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Constant Puyo, 1896

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Constant Puyo, 1896

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Constant Puyo, 1896

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Constant Puyo, 1896

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Constant Puyo, 1896

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Constant Puyo, 1896

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Adolph de Meyer, 1896

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Adolph de Meyer, 1896

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Adolph de Meyer, 1896

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Adolph de Meyer, 1896

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Baron Adolph De Meyer – The Cup, 1896

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Baron Adolph De Meyer

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The Black Bowl by George Seeley, circa 1907

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Portrait of Martine McCulloch by Gertrude Käsebier, 1910

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Mary Pickford, 1917 by Nelson Evans

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Dolores, Vogue, May 1919 by Adolph de Meyer


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This Artist Upcycles Textile Waste Into Beautiful And Elegant Resin Stools

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Designer Ammar Kalo has found a beautiful new use for discarded textiles in fabrications, a series of resin stools topped with colorful pieces of fabric. After the fabric is carefully arranged by hand, Kalo traps the pieces of cloth in resin that’s cured until solid. The low-tech production requires few raw materials.

h/t: inhabitat

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“While the prototypes are produced using general purpose polyester resin, the intention is to make larger quantities using green resin, bio plastic, or bio resin in order to make a more ‘green’ product,” says Kalo.

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“Of Beasts And Beauty”: Artist Creates Beautiful Animal Jewelry Out Of Silver And Bronze

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According to designer Michael Tatom: “About 25 years ago I was mainly a jeweler, doing all the typical jewelry for a retail store. But on the side I was carving stone in my brother’s studio, doing smooth animal forms with facet lines for the muscle definition. Eventually, I started doing them in bronze and many years later at the urging of my wife I applied that style to a jewelry line and launched the “Of beasts and beauty” store.”

h/t: boredpanda

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“Now I barely have time for anything else! With each piece I try to create something that is beautiful from every angle and has movement, every arc leading into another. I have included a few photos of wax carvings before they are cast and a partially carved bracelet. Most of my jewelry and small sculptures are carved from this hard wax. Larger sculptures are made with hard oil clay.”, Michael told Bored Panda.

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“I start a project by looking at photos then I do a profile drawing. I apply the drawing to the wax and transfer a basic line drawing to it, then I start carving, occasionally looking at photos for details. Mostly I just go by feel (which drives my realist artist friends crazy). At some point I realize I have managed to make something that has special movement or expression and I know I’m almost done. I still do a lot of contemporary gold/diamond/colored stone jewelry but the animal jewelry/sculpture is where my heart is.”, he added.

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Beautiful Pen Drawings By The Dutch Artist Laura Brouwers

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The artist’s pen name is Cyarin but her real name is Laura Brouwers, and she is from the Netherlands. The artist herself is very appreciative towards her watchers/followers on social media and even hosts a ‘Sketch Me Cyarin’ event every month or so in which she’ll select a few random followers who have tagged her in an image on their instagram.

A sweatpants kind of day uvu ✨ Thanks for coming to my stream for those who did!!

A photo posted by Laura Brouwers (@cyarine) on

Outfit of the day~ This shirt has been with me for years and it's still comfy as heck. Have a great evening! ;A;

A photo posted by Laura Brouwers (@cyarine) on


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Beautiful, Dramatic Illustrations Of Ocean Waves And Galaxies In Coffee Mugs By Victoria Siemer

wavescoffeecup2-640x456

Victoria Siemer is a New York-based graphic designer created a heartbreaking ‘Human Error’ series, which gives your morning cup of coffee an additional dose of surrealism with her latest project, entitled ‘Coffee Cup Manipulations’.

wavescoffeecup3-640x465

Digitally orchestrating big ocean waves, beautiful currents sweeping against rocks on shores and the calming visuals of mysterious galaxies, Siemer skillfully fits them into the confines of regular mugs and teacups, serving up a dramatic visual against the otherwise normal backdrop of a typical morning scene.

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Drift Away: Beautiful Handcrafted Eco-Friendly Jewelry Made From Driftwood And Bioresin

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The societal pressures of living in a fast-paced city can be daunting and stifling. We become engulfed by its constant demands and expectations that may often weigh us down.

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Through the use of natural driftwood, this collection symbolises the spirit of breaking free from all things harmful to live freely. The organic form and pattern of driftwood result in a unique, one-of-a-kind creation – serving as a reminder to be our truest self and not succumb to uniformity.

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The pieces are designed and handcrafted by Amado Gudek studio in Singapore using Mopani drfitwood, eco-friendly wooden beads and bioresin.

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“The societal pressures of living in a fast-paced city can be daunting and stifling. We become engulfed by its constant demands and expectations that may often weigh us down. Our latest collection, ‘Drift away’ – seeks to inspire the act of freeing oneself from that very struggle.”, says the designers.

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“Through the use of natural driftwood, the collection symbolises the spirit of breaking free from all things harmful to live freely. The organic form and pattern of driftwood result in a unique, one-of-a-kind creation, so no two pieces are ever alike. On another dimension, this serves as a reminder to be our truest self and not succumb to uniformity.”

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