Tag Archives: back

Design Experience That Matters, Book Review: The Back of the Napkin

Cartoons! They carpet the walls of our studio, and they make frequent appearances in Design that Matters presentations and TED talks. In his 2009 book, The Back of the Napkin, design thinker and professional doodler Dan Roam demonstrates how simple cartoons can help us to explain and visualize complex concepts, brainstorm more effectively and extract meaning from piles of data.

The Back of the Napkin argues that if you can draw a smiley face and a stick figure, you’re ready to become a visual thinker. The book demonstrates how even simple doodles can help ideas jump off the page.

DtM’s value is expressed in terms of novel solutions to tough problems. Where powerpoint slides and bullet points can lead to anxiety and boredom, drawing cartoons makes people happy. Happy people are more creative. Creativity pays the bills at DtM.

But there’s more! We’ve found loads of resources describing human-centered design research methods, including IDEO’s Method Cards and the LUMA Institute’s Innovating for People. Back of the Napkin is the first book we found that explains the kinds of visual “frameworks” we use for data-reduction. Frameworks help us to organize the enormous undifferentiated mass of observations and insights we collect during field research. Frameworks lead to qualitative design principles, and then to quantitative product requirements and specifications. Roam’s framework examples on pages 130-133 are worth the price of the book.

And if you buy this or any of the other books through the links in this email, Amazon will send part of the proceeds to DtM!

[The Back of the Napkin]

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This “Design Experience that Matters” series is provided courtesy of Timothy Prestero and the team at Design that Matters (DtM). As a nonprofit, DtM collaborates with leading social entrepreneurs and hundreds of volunteers to design new medical technologies for the poor in developing countries. DtM’s Firefly infant phototherapy device is treating thousands of newborns in 21 counties from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. In 2012, DtM was named the winner of the National Design Award.


Core77

A Dinner Through The Eyes Of A Photographer & Chef – A Series Of Portraits Taking You Back To The Origin Of A Menu

In a series of portraits, Robbie Postma (chef) and Robert Harrison (photographer) take the viewer back to the origin of a menu. Through visual imagination and culinary flair, they evoke every step of a fine dining experience, but rather than focusing of the final, finessed dishes, MENU makes the raw, unprocessed ingredients the heroes. Served on the closest place you can get to a chef’s mind: on his face.

More info: Robert Harrison, Instagram

When creating these images, Postma and Harrison stuck to the same principles and values a chef would when creating a menu: paying a lot of attention to the details, the composition, the preparation and of course the ingredients. From cutlery to coffee bean, every component is painstakingly prepared to produce the ultimate effect. And every grain of rice was added by hand, without the aid of digital manipulation. MENU is hand crafted. Just like the best food.





Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Superbike-inspired Nike Air Jordan IV Motorsport sneakers going back into production

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The shoes were sold to commemorate the team’s fourth anniversary.

Continue reading Superbike-inspired Nike Air Jordan IV Motorsport sneakers going back into production

Superbike-inspired Nike Air Jordan IV Motorsport sneakers going back into production originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 22 Mar 2017 17:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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The Brilliant Way FDR Got America Back to Work—While Beautifying the Country and Protecting Our Environment

We’re currently working up an entry on a very cool toolbox of historical significance. But before we can get to it, we have to give you this brief history lesson to provide some context. We hope you’ll find it interesting on its own merits.

In 1933 America was doing poorly; the Great Depression meant millions of people were starving and out of work. When Franklin Delano Roosevelt took office in January of 1933, he brought with him a couple of brilliant ways to improve the lives of citizens while boosting the long-term health of the country. Two of the New Deal programs he used to do this were the Civilian Conservation Corps and the Works Progress Administration.

The Civilian Conservation Corps, as the name suggests, was focused on conservation. The CCC took hundreds of thousands, then millions, of young, unemployed men and sent them to camps. (I know that doesn’t sound promising, stick with me here!) 

At the camps these men were provided food, shelter, free medical care and a living wage. They were trained in how to build, fix and grow things, and then they were put to work in teams.

They renovated America’s national parks. They created trails and built roads. They did landscaping to control erosion, dug ditches to contain flooding. They built public camping grounds, picnic grounds and service buildings. They planted nearly three billion trees, strengthening America’s forests. 

“This type of work,” President Roosevelt told Congress, “is of definite, practical value, not only through the prevention of great present financial loss, but also as a means of creating future national wealth.”

Additionally, getting these men–70% of whom were malnourished at the CCC’s start in 1933–fed and having them perform physical labor improved their physical health and well-being. 

Morale was raised through the performance of important, meaningful work. The training and experience gave them marketable skills they could use to find work after the economy improved. Education programs in the camps taught the illiterate to read.

The Works Progress Administration was similar to the CCC, but focused on public works, building roads, bridges, schools, libraries, courthouses, police and fire stations, hospitals, museums, community centers, playgrounds, et cetera. They also laid crucial infrastructure, installing water mains, sewage and electricity to areas that previously had none.

The WPA also had a subsidiary project called Federal Project Number One, where they employed thousands of artists, designers, musicians and writers. 

You can see more of the graphic design work that came out of this program here.

By the time World War II obviated the need for both of these programs, 8.5 million people had participated in the WPA and a further three million had participated in the CCC. As a country, we came out of these programs stronger, smarter, more skilled and with money in our pockets. We also had better roads and infrastructure, more usable national parks and beautiful new municipal buildings. 

Okay, history lesson over. Stay tuned for the toolbox story.


Core77

The Brilliant Way FDR Got America Back to Work—While Beautifying the Country and Protecting Our Environment

We’re currently working up an entry on a very cool toolbox of historical significance. But before we can get to it, we have to give you this brief history lesson to provide some context. We hope you’ll find it interesting on its own merits.

In 1933 America was doing poorly; the Great Depression meant millions of people were starving and out of work. When Franklin Delano Roosevelt took office in January of 1933, he brought with him a couple of brilliant ways to improve the lives of citizens while boosting the long-term health of the country. Two of the New Deal programs he used to do this were the Civilian Conservation Corps and the Works Progress Administration.

The Civilian Conservation Corps, as the name suggests, was focused on conservation. The CCC took hundreds of thousands, then millions, of young, unemployed men and sent them to camps. (I know that doesn’t sound promising, stick with me here!) 

At the camps these men were provided food, shelter, free medical care and a living wage. They were trained in how to build, fix and grow things, and then they were put to work in teams.

They renovated America’s national parks. They created trails and built roads. They did landscaping to control erosion, dug ditches to contain flooding. They built public camping grounds, picnic grounds and service buildings. They planted nearly three billion trees, strengthening America’s forests. 

“This type of work,” President Roosevelt told Congress, “is of definite, practical value, not only through the prevention of great present financial loss, but also as a means of creating future national wealth.”

Additionally, getting these men–70% of whom were malnourished at the CCC’s start in 1933–fed and having them perform physical labor improved their physical health and well-being. 

Morale was raised through the performance of important, meaningful work. The training and experience gave them marketable skills they could use to find work after the economy improved. Education programs in the camps taught the illiterate to read.

The Works Progress Administration was similar to the CCC, but focused on public works, building roads, bridges, schools, libraries, courthouses, police and fire stations, hospitals, museums, community centers, playgrounds, et cetera. They also laid crucial infrastructure, installing water mains, sewage and electricity to areas that previously had none.

The WPA also had a subsidiary project called Federal Project Number One, where they employed thousands of artists, designers, musicians and writers. 

You can see more of the graphic design work that came out of this program here.

By the time World War II obviated the need for both of these programs, 8.5 million people had participated in the WPA and a further three million had participated in the CCC. As a country, we came out of these programs stronger, smarter, more skilled and with money in our pockets. We also had better roads and infrastructure, more usable national parks and beautiful new municipal buildings. 

Okay, history lesson over. Stay tuned for the toolbox story.


Core77

The Brilliant Way FDR Got America Back to Work—While Beautifying the Country and Protecting Our Environment

We’re currently working up an entry on a very cool toolbox of historical significance. But before we can get to it, we have to give you this brief history lesson to provide some context. We hope you’ll find it interesting on its own merits.

In 1933 America was doing poorly; the Great Depression meant millions of people were starving and out of work. When Franklin Delano Roosevelt took office in January of 1933, he brought with him a couple of brilliant ways to improve the lives of citizens while boosting the long-term health of the country. Two of the New Deal programs he used to do this were the Civilian Conservation Corps and the Works Progress Administration.

The Civilian Conservation Corps, as the name suggests, was focused on conservation. The CCC took hundreds of thousands, then millions, of young, unemployed men and sent them to camps. (I know that doesn’t sound promising, stick with me here!) 

At the camps these men were provided food, shelter, free medical care and a living wage. They were trained in how to build, fix and grow things, and then they were put to work in teams.

They renovated America’s national parks. They created trails and built roads. They did landscaping to control erosion, dug ditches to contain flooding. They built public camping grounds, picnic grounds and service buildings. They planted nearly three billion trees, strengthening America’s forests. 

“This type of work,” President Roosevelt told Congress, “is of definite, practical value, not only through the prevention of great present financial loss, but also as a means of creating future national wealth.”

Additionally, getting these men–70% of whom were malnourished at the CCC’s start in 1933–fed and having them perform physical labor improved their physical health and well-being. 

Morale was raised through the performance of important, meaningful work. The training and experience gave them marketable skills they could use to find work after the economy improved. Education programs in the camps taught the illiterate to read.

The Works Progress Administration was similar to the CCC, but focused on public works, building roads, bridges, schools, libraries, courthouses, police and fire stations, hospitals, museums, community centers, playgrounds, et cetera. They also laid crucial infrastructure, installing water mains, sewage and electricity to areas that previously had none.

The WPA also had a subsidiary project called Federal Project Number One, where they employed thousands of artists, designers, musicians and writers. 

You can see more of the graphic design work that came out of this program here.

By the time World War II obviated the need for both of these programs, 8.5 million people had participated in the WPA and a further three million had participated in the CCC. As a country, we came out of these programs stronger, smarter, more skilled and with money in our pockets. We also had better roads and infrastructure, more usable national parks and beautiful new municipal buildings. 

Okay, history lesson over. Stay tuned for the toolbox story.


Core77

The 24 Hour War: Adam Carolla’s new documentary brings the Ford-Ferrari battle back to life

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The film makes the best of limited footage from the era and features new interviews with nearly all the surviving protagonists.

Continue reading The 24 Hour War: Adam Carolla’s new documentary brings the Ford-Ferrari battle back to life

The 24 Hour War: Adam Carolla’s new documentary brings the Ford-Ferrari battle back to life originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 29 Dec 2016 17:55:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog

The 24 Hour War: Adam Carolla’s new documentary brings the Ford-Ferrari battle back to life

Filed under: ,,,,

The film makes the best of limited footage from the era and features new interviews with nearly all the surviving protagonists.

Continue reading The 24 Hour War: Adam Carolla’s new documentary brings the Ford-Ferrari battle back to life

The 24 Hour War: Adam Carolla’s new documentary brings the Ford-Ferrari battle back to life originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 29 Dec 2016 17:55:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink |  Email this |  Comments
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Bizarre, Colorful Hairstyles Feature Images Of Animals Shaved Into Back Of Heads

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Based in Saint Petersburg, Russian hairdresser Aliya Askarova, who is also the creative director of Image Studio Denis Osipov, has created these amazing works of hair art. She first shaves the back of the head according to the shape requested by the customer before dyeing it in all sorts of colors to make the image pop. So far, we have seen hairstyles featuring animals such as a cat, a fox and a whale.

More info: Aliya Askarova (h/t: designtaxi)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Bizarre, Colorful Hairstyles Feature Images Of Animals Shaved Into Back Of Heads

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Based in Saint Petersburg, Russian hairdresser Aliya Askarova, who is also the creative director of Image Studio Denis Osipov, has created these amazing works of hair art. She first shaves the back of the head according to the shape requested by the customer before dyeing it in all sorts of colors to make the image pop. So far, we have seen hairstyles featuring animals such as a cat, a fox and a whale.

More info: Aliya Askarova (h/t: designtaxi)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Bizarre, Colorful Hairstyles Feature Images Of Animals Shaved Into Back Of Heads

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Based in Saint Petersburg, Russian hairdresser Aliya Askarova, who is also the creative director of Image Studio Denis Osipov, has created these amazing works of hair art. She first shaves the back of the head according to the shape requested by the customer before dyeing it in all sorts of colors to make the image pop. So far, we have seen hairstyles featuring animals such as a cat, a fox and a whale.

More info: Aliya Askarova (h/t: designtaxi)

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Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

VW admits that its diesels might never come back to the US

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Who’s ready for Voltswagen?

Continue reading VW admits that its diesels might never come back to the US

VW admits that its diesels might never come back to the US originally appeared on Autoblog on Sat, 17 Sep 2016 15:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog

VW admits that its diesels might never come back to the US

Filed under: ,,,

Who’s ready for Voltswagen?

Continue reading VW admits that its diesels might never come back to the US

VW admits that its diesels might never come back to the US originally appeared on Autoblog on Sat, 17 Sep 2016 15:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Toyota’s chief engineer wants the Supra name back

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Toyota’s Tetsuya Tada is hard at work co-developing a sports car with BMW, but he took some time in Australia to explain how much he loves the Supra name.

Continue reading Toyota’s chief engineer wants the Supra name back

Toyota’s chief engineer wants the Supra name back originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 03 Aug 2016 17:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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