Tag Archives: 2017

Milan Design Week 2017: Form Follows Fiction

As the industry’s biggest annual trade fair, the Salone del Mobile is certainly an occasion to reflect on the state of design today—both implicitly and explicitly as certain schools and organizations take the opportunity to critique the commercial pretense of both the Salone and the mobile. This year, two venues in particular captured a more cerebral notion of design week, though the skepticism—about making more stuff—also took various forms around Milan.

Once again, Atelier Clerici—a perennial exhibition set in the eponymous Palazzo in the heart of Milan—served as a kind of embassy for Dutch design, anchored by the Design Academy Eindhoven and a half-dozen kindred spirits. (Full disclosure: I am currently a student in the Masters Design Curating & Writing program at the DAE.) Curated by Jan Boelen, the head of the Masters in Social Design, the heady exhibition was conceived as a high-concept critique of contemporary newsmedia in the context of design weeks, Milan, and reportage in general. Set in a darkened mock TV studio, the slick production value of #TVClerici relegated artifacts to the periphery of the double-height space, such that the daily performances would literally take center stage. 

Enter a uccaption (optional)

Once again, Atelier Clerici—a perennial exhibition set in the eponymous Palazzo in the heart of Milan — served as a kind of embassy for Dutch design, anchored by the Design Academy Eindhoven and a half-dozen kindred spirits. (Full disclosure: I am currently a student in the Masters Design Curating & Writing program at the DAE.) Curated by Jan Boelen, the head of the Masters in Social Design, the heady exhibition was conceived as a high-concept critique of contemporary newsmedia in the context of design weeks, Milan, and reportage in general. Set in a darkened mock TV studio, the slick production value of #TVClerici relegated artifacts to the periphery of the double-height space, such that the daily performances would literally take center stage.

With the galleria transformed into a black-box playhouse, #TVClerici could best be described as an overambitious bit of theater, brazenly skipping ahead to meta-meta-level critique as a performance about media. In that sense, the concept soared over the heads of visitors without quite scratching the surface of the sensationalist culture it set out to expose, not so much a mirror for society but rather another spectacle among others. After all, a daily series of scheduled performances — staged, semi-scripted segments—are not fictional events but decidedly real ones.

Contrived though the “look behind the curtain” may have been, the concept stopped short of onanism, thanks largely to the pseudo-professional production (down to the trucker caps) and earnest dramaturgy (i.e. recent grad Olle Lundin). All told, #TVClerici did offer commentary on specific issues in culture —gender, identity, etc. — precisely by renouncing design and aspiring to art.

The balance of the offerings at Atelier Clerici were rather more conventional, with several notable presentations in the gilded halls of the neoclassical former residence. As a counterpoint to the void of the stage, two other exhibitors opted for a single massive plinth in the center of the room. Amsterdam-based periodical MacGuffin (pictured above) literally and figuratively examined the sink—each issue explores a single subject at length—while the Envisions collective reprised their graphically arresting mise-en-scène of models and form studies. (Other participants included Het Nieuwe Instituut, Fictional Journal, Space Caviar, Z33, and more; see more images below and find more details here.)

See more images of Finsa by Envisions here.

If Boelen’s boldest statement was to bring the Design Academy from the periphery of Milan (i.e. Ventura Lambrate) to the very heart of the city, it was another exhibition tucked in a relatively quiet corner of town that posed a veritable counterpoint. Isolated if not insulated from the other design week festivities, Cascina Cuccagna, a converted urban farmhouse, hosted another polemical group exhibition. 

Forgoing the knowingness of a hashtag for a pithy declaration, Capitalism Is Over was clearly billed as “a provocation or parody,” its overarching message (per the title) at once blunt and pointed. Curators Raumplan commissioned editorial and documentary photography to illustrate the point, the former imagery serving as a kind of ad campaign, the latter physically and metaphorically sited at the center of the second-story space. (In the wings around the courtyard, smaller galleries offered an eclectic mix of projects in varied media, from data visualization to spoken word, to round out the exhibition.)

The spirit of the Capitalism Is Over comes in the guise of architecture photography: On one hand, “But It Used to Be So Cool” documents Olivetti’s headquarters in Ivrea as a throwback to post-war prosperity; on the other hand, “Bigger Faster Cheaper” offers Gursky-esque imagery of IKEA and Amazon logistics hubs in Piacenza. The typewriter company, of course, represents the boom time between 1945–1975, Trente Glorieuses, since eclipsed by the rise of neo-liberal economic models that have resulted in the likes of IKEA and Amazon. The two series of photographs invite facile, fertile comparison—vaguely nationalist nostalgia versus unbounded robo-futurism—in the face of a so-called post-capitalist era, the “fictional framework” of the entire exhibition.

It was a sentiment that resonated not only throughout the Cascina Cuccagna—Capitalism Is Over also included a few room-sized installations and a single “stockroom” gallery with design objects (pictured above)—but also in other exhibitions in Ventura Lambrate.

While Kvadrat launched the much-publicized upcycling initiative Really., Design School Kolding took a more poetic approach to repurposing waste materials and offcuts. For Super Supermarket, the Danish academy partnered with the textile manufacturer and 13 other brands, from Fritz Hansen to Ecco to Royal Dansk, repackaging scraps of leather, metal, plastic, and even potato pulp into faux-grocery items. Thoughtfully conceived and executed, the retail setting offered a delightfully subversive twist on both consumption and upcycling, coming as close as possible to having one’s cake and eating it too.

But perhaps the most compelling fiction came from yet another school. Further afield in the Lambrate district, Burg Halle staged How Do We Deal with This?, a performative investigation into the topic of borders. The chainlink fence and whitewashed medical setting alluded to more pressing problems in society, those for which design alone may not be able to offer a solution, literally encapsulating the placebo effect of late-capitalist consumer culture in the form of a pill.

Ostensibly about geopolitical borders, the metaphor applies to design as well: Where do we draw the line between art and commerce? At Atelier Clerici, the DAE’s transgressive presentation format was a kind of sleight of hand, eliding the distinction between the design and how it is represented. Did #TVClerici overstep the definition of design by extending it to include media writ large—i.e. conflating TV “production” with the design and manufacturing of objects? Moreover, will capitalism ever be “over?”

Either way, the show must go on.


Core77

Overpriced and underwhelming | 2017 Nissan Sentra NISMO

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Looking for a nice little compact performance car? Better look elsewhere.

Continue reading Overpriced and underwhelming | 2017 Nissan Sentra NISMO

Overpriced and underwhelming | 2017 Nissan Sentra NISMO originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 18 Apr 2017 18:25:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Milan Design Week 2017: Best in Glass

Just over a century ago, Paul Scheerbart noted that “the new glass environment will completely transform mankind, and it remains only to wish that the new glass culture will not find too many opponents.” Captivated by Bruno Taut’s 1914 glass pavilion, the writer painted a utopian picture of a crystalline future, equally panoramic and kaleidoscopic, all thanks to the transparent building material. Suffice it to say that he would have been chagrined to learn that visitors to, say, Massimiliano Fuksas’ formidable Fieramilano spend more time in its hangar-like exhibition halls than they do admiring its soaring glass canopy (ditto I.M. Pei’s ziggurat-like Javits Center).

Architectural applications aside, “glass culture” continues to thrive at the scale of product design and craft. From a breakthrough in 3D-printed glass to a collection of pieces from weekend workshop in Portugal, here are a few noteworthy new glass projects from Milan this year.

The Mediated Matter Group – “Ancient Yet Modern”

Led by Neri Oxman, this research group at MIT’s Media Lab first published its findings in optically transparent 3D-printed glass back in 2015. Now, with G3DP2, the whiz-kids have scaled the technology up, from product scale to that of architecture. To show off their latest efforts, the Mediated Matter Group installed “Ancient Yet Modern,” a series of three freestanding columns embedded with synapse-light pulsing lights, at the Triennale di Milano.

Project Team: Chikara Inamura (project lead), Michael Stern, Daniel Lizardo, Tal Achituv, Tomer Weller, Owen Trueblood, Nassia Inglessis, Giorgia Franchin, Kelly Donovan, Peter Houk (project adviser), Prof. Neri Oxman (project and group director).

Project Associates: Andrea Magdanz, Susan Shapiro, David J. Benyosef, Mary Ann Babula, Forrest Whitcher, Robert Philips, Neils La White, Paula Aguilera, Jonathan Williams, Andy Ryan, Jeremy Flower.

Off Portugal presents Glass Cares

On the other end of the proverbial spectrum, OFF Portugal took the time-honored tack of gathering designers for a weekend workshop — in this case, glass-blowing in Marinha Grande. Two days in the making as opposed to two years, the resulting ten pieces offer a nice capsule collection of Portuguese design today as young designers look to move beyond the nation’s ready association with cork. The glass workshop 

The glass workshop and exhibition in Ventura Lambrate marks the debut of OFF Portugal, a joint effort between Vicara, Arquivo 237, and Cencal; future initiatives will explore other craft and manufacturing techniques.

Participating designers: Diana Medina, Eneida Lombe Tavares, Luis Nascimento, studio ojoaoeamaria, Jorge Carreira, Paulo Sellmayer, Samuel Reis, Vitor Agostinho, Manuel Amaral Netto, and Joana Silva

Salviati presents Decode/Recode

Speaking of long traditions, Venice-based Salviati is among the world’s oldest glass factories, dating back to 1859. For this year’s Milan design week, the Murano specialists presented a pair of installations at the newly minted Ventura Centrale district, a series of cavernous makeshift galleries underneath the train tracks. For Decode/Recode, Salviati invited Luca Nichetto and Ben Gorham to create modular works of glass, “Pyrae” and “Strata.”

Having long collaborated with his fellow Venetians — Salviati produced his first piece — Nichetto developed 25 modules that are combined in different configurations to create the 53 totem-pole-like figures, each illuminated from within. Meanwhile, Gorham, a perfumer by profession, opted for luminous towers to showcase glass tiles in various textures and finishes.

Spektacularis at Matter and Muse

An entirely unexpected joint effort between Filipino industrial designers and Czech master glassblowers, Spektacularis was one of three exhibitors in Matter and Muse, which occupied a modest gallery at the Palazzo Litta. The mutual unfamiliarity yielded expected results, hybrid objets d’art that incorporate elements of both cultures.

Participating designers: Stanley Ruiz, Liliana Manahan, Gabriel Lichauco, Jiri Panicek

“Prism” collection by Tomás Alonso

Atelier Swarovski Home at Palazzo Crespi

The Austrian crystal producer unveiled its latest home decor collections, developed by designers such as 2016 Swarovski Designer of the Future winners Studio Brynjar & Veronika and Tomás Alonso, who extended his collection. Scintillating though the wares may be, the gilded setting stole the show.

“Prism” collection by Tomás Alonso
“Prism” collection by Tomás Alonso
“Currents” collection by Studio Brynjar & Veronika

Other new Swarovski Home collections (not pictured) were designed by Aldo Bakker, Barbara Barry, Andre Kikoski, and Greg Lynn.

Roll & Hill launched Ladies & Gentlemen Studio‘s new “Kazimir” chandelier at Euroluce. Art/design history buffs can probably guess which Suprematist painter inspired the Brooklyn-based duo.

Also noteworthy

Naturally, this is just a selection of works in glass from design week in Milan; here are a few others that also caught our eye at the Salone and beyond. 

The New York-based lighting company also debuted the “Coax” collection by John Hogan
Meanwhile, at SaloneSatellite, Berlin’s Mendelheit Design Lab showed a mix of products, including several glass pieces. Created in a mold made from up to 128 different blocks, the “Tombola” generative vase can take countless forms.
Germans Ermics exhibited three ombre pieces at Rossana Orlandi; the chair, in particular, is an homage to Shiro Kuramata (forgive the awkward photo and check out more on his website)


Core77

Breaking records, enterprise fundings are up nearly 80% in Q1 2017

 After a lackluster year for enterprise technology venture capital investments, 2017 kicked off with a record breaking quarter for enterprise technology startups. Following 4 straight quarters of decreasing investment, investors poured a record-breaking $ 5 billion dollars into enterprise technology startups in the first quarter of 2017 alone – a nearly 80% increase from the previous… Read More


TechCrunch

Autoblog Editors Choice: Best of the 2017 New York Auto Show

We select the five best reveals of the 2017 New York Auto Show, with vehicles from Honda, Lincoln, Jeep, Toyota, and Dodge.

Continue reading Autoblog Editors Choice: Best of the 2017 New York Auto Show

Autoblog Editors Choice: Best of the 2017 New York Auto Show originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 14 Apr 2017 17:30:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog Editors Choice: Best of the 2017 New York Auto Show

We select the five best reveals of the 2017 New York Auto Show, with vehicles from Honda, Lincoln, Jeep, Toyota, and Dodge.

Continue reading Autoblog Editors Choice: Best of the 2017 New York Auto Show

Autoblog Editors Choice: Best of the 2017 New York Auto Show originally appeared on Autoblog on Fri, 14 Apr 2017 17:30:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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The Best Photographs Taken With ‘Krappy Kameras’ In 2017


Photograph © Kim Kew Shaw (1st Place, 2017 Krappy Kamera Competition), Holga

The main condition one needs to fulfil to participate in the competition is using inexpensive cameras such as Holga, Diana, or Ansco or cheap lenses. Several days ago, Soho Photo Gallery in NYC closed the exhibition of the winning works of the annual Krappy Kamera contest. According to the organizers, their task is to show that using expensive equipment is not the main element in taking valuable and talented photographs.

More info: Soho Photo (h/t: birdinflight)


Photograph © Eddie Wexler (2nd Place; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competiton) Diana


Photograph © DeAnna Foran (3rd Place; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competiton) Diana


Photograph © John Armstrong (HM; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Darlene DeVita (HM; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Lensbaby on Canon


Photograph © Ian MacLellan (HM; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Pinhole


Photograph © Jonas Yip (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Julie Mihaly (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Diana


Photograph © Armen Dolukhanyan (HM; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Pinhole


Photograph © Gregory Russo (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Kate Oiseau (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Jennifer Rinchey (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Anna Soper(2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Jacqueline Walters (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

The Best Photographs Taken With ‘Krappy Kameras’ In 2017


Photograph © Kim Kew Shaw (1st Place, 2017 Krappy Kamera Competition), Holga

The main condition one needs to fulfil to participate in the competition is using inexpensive cameras such as Holga, Diana, or Ansco or cheap lenses. Several days ago, Soho Photo Gallery in NYC closed the exhibition of the winning works of the annual Krappy Kamera contest. According to the organizers, their task is to show that using expensive equipment is not the main element in taking valuable and talented photographs.

More info: Soho Photo (h/t: birdinflight)


Photograph © Eddie Wexler (2nd Place; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competiton) Diana


Photograph © DeAnna Foran (3rd Place; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competiton) Diana


Photograph © John Armstrong (HM; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Darlene DeVita (HM; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Lensbaby on Canon


Photograph © Ian MacLellan (HM; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Pinhole


Photograph © Jonas Yip (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Julie Mihaly (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Diana


Photograph © Armen Dolukhanyan (HM; 2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Pinhole


Photograph © Gregory Russo (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Kate Oiseau (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Jennifer Rinchey (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Anna Soper(2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Photograph © Jacqueline Walters (2017 Krappy Kamera Competition) Holga


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Milan Design Week 2017: Everyone is a Winner at HEAD Genève’s Salone Ludico

As of last year, mobile gaming revenue surpassed that of console and PC. Angry Birds or Pokémon Go may be great ways to kill time, but digital games need not be solitary pursuits confined to screens—on the contrary, distraction can aspire to reveal something more profound. Case in point, a series of interactive games developed by the Master students in the Media Design department of HEAD Genève, unveiled in Milan last week.

Easily a highlight of the Fuorisalone, Salone Ludico was tucked away on a side street of the Brera District, away from the bustling retail arteries where design-week revelers spill into the streets when the wine starts flowing. From April 4–9, the students transformed Mimmo Scognamiglio Artecontemporanea into a futuristic gaming den, a “salone ludico,” the latter term meaning “play.” The space may have resembled a white-walled gallery space at first glance, but the projects on view were less objets d’art than properly interactive artworks—proposals to show both for how gaming can be more than mere distraction, and  how design can mean more than just tables and chairs.

From a card game based on particle physics to a supine VR experience of the afterlife, all 12 of the projects—upwards of 18 months in the making—are thoughtfully conceived and rigorously executed. Standouts included Benoît Renaudin‘s speculative wunderkamer from 3017 (featuring Swiss-designed items enhanced by audio commentary), and Margaux Charvolin and Jessica Friedling‘s app-powered alchemical cocktail-making contraption.

“Murmures” by Benoît Renaudin
“Penultimo” by Margaux Charvolin and Jessica Friedling.
Detail view of Penultimo

But the best part was that the projects weren’t merely on view—to be admired and photographed for social media—but that they worked more or less flawlessly: Visitors could actually navigate “Bloodbank,” a side-scrolling video game, with a lit match; experience a “concert” at home via “KBPS”; and, of course, actually taste the cocktail that they just whipped up.

Doesn’t that sound better than star ratings or experience points?

“Ximoan” by Patrick Donaldson, Yoann Douillet, Raphaël Henocq and Laurent Monnet
“Oniri Islands” by Marion Bareil and Tourmaline Studio
“DarkLight” by Sarah Bourquin, Jessica Friedling, Valérie Pierrehumbert and Eun-Sun Lee
“Democrapcy” by Yoann Douillet, Mélissa Pisler, Israel Viadest, Marion Bareil and Léa Schönfelder
“Gravity” by Sébastien Beureux, Jessica Friedling, Charles-Henri Hayoz and Vincent de Vevey, adapted from PadPad by Jérémie Lasnier

More information about the exhibition and all of the projects is available at SaloneLudico.ch.


Core77

What grownups drive (fast) | 2017 Subaru Forester 2.0XT Touring Review

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Comfortable, quirky, and plenty powerful, with some solid updates for 2017.

Continue reading What grownups drive (fast) | 2017 Subaru Forester 2.0XT Touring Review

What grownups drive (fast) | 2017 Subaru Forester 2.0XT Touring Review originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 10 Apr 2017 15:30:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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2017 Ford F-250 recalled because they could roll while in park

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If you own a 2017 F-250 powered by 6.2-liter gasoline engine, you’ll want to pay attention.

Continue reading 2017 Ford F-250 recalled because they could roll while in park

2017 Ford F-250 recalled because they could roll while in park originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 02 Apr 2017 08:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Celebrating Old and New Technology at Air Max Day 2017

March 26, 1987 brought us one of the most infamous sneakers in history—the Air Max 1. While Air Max technology was originally introduced eight years earlier in the Tailwind, the Air Max 1 was the first time the air technology was made at a larger scale and visible from the outside. Since its debut as both a function and fashion staple with the Air Max 1, air technology has been through quite the evolution. With its countless appearances in coveted collaborations with athletes, brands and sneaker stores like Atmos, to its key role in various sneaker silhouettes, Nike’s air technology has made itself a staple in just about every sneaker collector’s closet.

The original Air Max 1 

Yesterday, Nike hosted events celebrating Air Max’s big 30th birthday. While other countries celebrated in their own ways, here in New York City, we had a go big or go home mentality, as per usual. Celebrations were hosted in multiple locations throughout the city, each with their own surprises. Here’s a taste of what went down during the big birthday bash at our three favorite locations: 

The Nike Air Vapormax

Before getting into specific locations, it’s important to note the star of yesterday’s show: The Nike Air Vapormax. This brand new silhouette takes Nike’s air technology to the next level with a sole that incorporates huge air pockets that make the Air Max 1’s visible air tech look like nothing. With previous Air Max models, you’re walking on a sole with air as a small buffer, but with the Vapormax, you’re basically just walking on air. 

Sneakeasy at Nike Clubhouse

At the Sneakeasy exhibit tucked away in Nike’s Clubhouse, Nike product specialists walked visitors through the history of air technology and explained Air Vapormax features. 

“The Nike Air Vapormax is the lightest, most high performing, most flexible Air Max we’ve ever created, weighing at just 8.8 oz in a men’s size 9 and with a range of motion similar to the Nike Free RN.”

There was also a chance for visitors to customize their own pair of Vapomax sneakers in an ultra fancy Nike id room, a room dedicated to the history of Nike’s air technology and a small exhibit centered around this year’s Vote Forward contest.

The first sneaker to incorporate air technology! Notice it’s not visible in the sole yet.
A cool display featuring inspiration for the Vote Forward contest.
Cool display Pt. 2
Nike id options

The third floor of the exhibit had a few more surprises—my favorite being a wall of custom Air Max sneakers designed by Alex Lee and Ava Nirui. Their cheeky designs all play on the name ‘Air Max’ in different ways:

“Food Processair”
“Horticultair”
“Erasair”
“Air RC”

Nike Soho

Nike’s new multi-level retail complex in Soho was the hub of the celebration, housing multiple installations, interactive activities and most importantly, a ton of free stuff (no complaints). My favorite display was a huge wall of different Air Max models accompanied by a giant movable screen. As you move the screen across the wall, different descriptions pop up over the sneaker you’re looking at.

One of my favorite Air Max’s—the Air 180 Easter Eggs!
Up close and personal!

NikeLab 21 Mercer

NikeLab released three very special sneakers, all incorporating the Vapormax sole. The most exciting release—and I’m guessing you’ll agree—is the Marc Newson x Nike NikeLab Air Vapormax. This isn’t the first time the Industrial Designer has collaborated with Nike (remember these?), and I certainly hope it’s not the last:

At NikeLab 21 Mercer

A very limited number of the funky sneaker-moccasins were released yesterday. Unfortunately, the smallest size released was an 8 men’s, and I’m a 7. Purchasing was out of the question, but that didn’t take away from the nerdy moment I was able to enjoy. I have to say, they’re very comfortable and fun to wear—the Vapormax sole is extremely light and easy to move around in.

I wish you were mine.

Air Max Day was a fun time all around. I always enjoy sneaker events because of the pure enthusiasm fans and collectors have about shoes—maybe because it justifies my obsession. There’s nothing like seeing or being a sneakerhead in a sneaker store, on a sneaker holiday—except maybe seeing or being a kid in a candy store the day after Halloween (when all the candy is half-priced, of course). Till next year, Air Max Day!


Core77

Celebrating Old and New Technology at Air Max Day 2017

March 26, 1987 brought us one of the most infamous sneakers in history—the Air Max 1. While Air Max technology was originally introduced eight years earlier in the Tailwind, the Air Max 1 was the first time the air technology was made at a larger scale and visible from the outside. Since its debut as both a function and fashion staple with the Air Max 1, air technology has been through quite the evolution. With its countless appearances in coveted collaborations with athletes, brands and sneaker stores like Atmos, to its key role in various sneaker silhouettes, Nike’s air technology has made itself a staple in just about every sneaker collector’s closet.

The original Air Max 1 

Yesterday, Nike hosted events celebrating Air Max’s big 30th birthday. While other countries celebrated in their own ways, here in New York City, we had a go big or go home mentality, as per usual. Celebrations were hosted in multiple locations throughout the city, each with their own surprises. Here’s a taste of what went down during the big birthday bash at our three favorite locations: 

The Nike Air Vapormax

Before getting into specific locations, it’s important to note the star of yesterday’s show: The Nike Air Vapormax. This brand new silhouette takes Nike’s air technology to the next level with a sole that incorporates huge air pockets that make the Air Max 1’s visible air tech look like nothing. With previous Air Max models, you’re walking on a sole with air as a small buffer, but with the Vapormax, you’re basically just walking on air. 

Sneakeasy at Nike Clubhouse

At the Sneakeasy exhibit tucked away in Nike’s Clubhouse, Nike product specialists walked visitors through the history of air technology and explained Air Vapormax features. 

“The Nike Air Vapormax is the lightest, most high performing, most flexible Air Max we’ve ever created, weighing at just 8.8 oz in a men’s size 9 and with a range of motion similar to the Nike Free RN.”

There was also a chance for visitors to customize their own pair of Vapomax sneakers in an ultra fancy Nike id room, a room dedicated to the history of Nike’s air technology and a small exhibit centered around this year’s Vote Forward contest.

The first sneaker to incorporate air technology! Notice it’s not visible in the sole yet.
A cool display featuring inspiration for the Vote Forward contest.
Cool display Pt. 2
Nike id options

The third floor of the exhibit had a few more surprises—my favorite being a wall of custom Air Max sneakers designed by Alex Lee and Ava Nirui. Their cheeky designs all play on the name ‘Air Max’ in different ways:

“Food Processair”
“Horticultair”
“Erasair”
“Air RC”

Nike Soho

Nike’s new multi-level retail complex in Soho was the hub of the celebration, housing multiple installations, interactive activities and most importantly, a ton of free stuff (no complaints). My favorite display was a huge wall of different Air Max models accompanied by a giant movable screen. As you move the screen across the wall, different descriptions pop up over the sneaker you’re looking at.

One of my favorite Air Max’s—the Air 180 Easter Eggs!
Up close and personal!

NikeLab 21 Mercer

NikeLab released three very special sneakers, all incorporating the Vapormax sole. The most exciting release—and I’m guessing you’ll agree—is the Marc Newson x Nike NikeLab Air Vapormax. This isn’t the first time the Industrial Designer has collaborated with Nike (remember these?), and I certainly hope it’s not the last:

At NikeLab 21 Mercer

A very limited number of the funky sneaker-moccasins were released yesterday. Unfortunately, the smallest size released was an 8 men’s, and I’m a 7. Purchasing was out of the question, but that didn’t take away from the nerdy moment I was able to enjoy. I have to say, they’re very comfortable and fun to wear—the Vapormax sole is extremely light and easy to move around in.

I wish you were mine.

Air Max Day was a fun time all around. I always enjoy sneaker events because of the pure enthusiasm fans and collectors have about shoes—maybe because it justifies my obsession. There’s nothing like seeing or being a sneakerhead in a sneaker store, on a sneaker holiday—except maybe seeing or being a kid in a candy store the day after Halloween (when all the candy is half-priced, of course). Till next year, Air Max Day!


Core77

Celebrating Old and New Technology at Air Max Day 2017

March 26, 1987 brought us one of the most infamous sneakers in history—the Air Max 1. While Air Max technology was originally introduced eight years earlier in the Tailwind, the Air Max 1 was the first time the air technology was made at a larger scale and visible from the outside. Since its debut as both a function and fashion staple with the Air Max 1, air technology has been through quite the evolution. With its countless appearances in coveted collaborations with athletes, brands and sneaker stores like Atmos, to its key role in various sneaker silhouettes, Nike’s air technology has made itself a staple in just about every sneaker collector’s closet.

The original Air Max 1 

Yesterday, Nike hosted events celebrating Air Max’s big 30th birthday. While other countries celebrated in their own ways, here in New York City, we had a go big or go home mentality, as per usual. Celebrations were hosted in multiple locations throughout the city, each with their own surprises. Here’s a taste of what went down during the big birthday bash at our three favorite locations: 

The Nike Air Vapormax

Before getting into specific locations, it’s important to note the star of yesterday’s show: The Nike Air Vapormax. This brand new silhouette takes Nike’s air technology to the next level with a sole that incorporates huge air pockets that make the Air Max 1’s visible air tech look like nothing. With previous Air Max models, you’re walking on a sole with air as a small buffer, but with the Vapormax, you’re basically just walking on air. 

Sneakeasy at Nike Clubhouse

At the Sneakeasy exhibit tucked away in Nike’s Clubhouse, Nike product specialists walked visitors through the history of air technology and explained Air Vapormax features. 

“The Nike Air Vapormax is the lightest, most high performing, most flexible Air Max we’ve ever created, weighing at just 8.8 oz in a men’s size 9 and with a range of motion similar to the Nike Free RN.”

There was also a chance for visitors to customize their own pair of Vapomax sneakers in an ultra fancy Nike id room, a room dedicated to the history of Nike’s air technology and a small exhibit centered around this year’s Vote Forward contest.

The first sneaker to incorporate air technology! Notice it’s not visible in the sole yet.
A cool display featuring inspiration for the Vote Forward contest.
Cool display Pt. 2
Nike id options

The third floor of the exhibit had a few more surprises—my favorite being a wall of custom Air Max sneakers designed by Alex Lee and Ava Nirui. Their cheeky designs all play on the name ‘Air Max’ in different ways:

“Food Processair”
“Horticultair”
“Erasair”
“Air RC”

Nike Soho

Nike’s new multi-level retail complex in Soho was the hub of the celebration, housing multiple installations, interactive activities and most importantly, a ton of free stuff (no complaints). My favorite display was a huge wall of different Air Max models accompanied by a giant movable screen. As you move the screen across the wall, different descriptions pop up over the sneaker you’re looking at.

One of my favorite Air Max’s—the Air 180 Easter Eggs!
Up close and personal!

NikeLab 21 Mercer

NikeLab released three very special sneakers, all incorporating the Vapormax sole. The most exciting release—and I’m guessing you’ll agree—is the Marc Newson x Nike NikeLab Air Vapormax. This isn’t the first time the Industrial Designer has collaborated with Nike (remember these?), and I certainly hope it’s not the last:

At NikeLab 21 Mercer

A very limited number of the funky sneaker-moccasins were released yesterday. Unfortunately, the smallest size released was an 8 men’s, and I’m a 7. Purchasing was out of the question, but that didn’t take away from the nerdy moment I was able to enjoy. I have to say, they’re very comfortable and fun to wear—the Vapormax sole is extremely light and easy to move around in.

I wish you were mine.

Air Max Day was a fun time all around. I always enjoy sneaker events because of the pure enthusiasm fans and collectors have about shoes—maybe because it justifies my obsession. There’s nothing like seeing or being a sneakerhead in a sneaker store, on a sneaker holiday—except maybe seeing or being a kid in a candy store the day after Halloween (when all the candy is half-priced, of course). Till next year, Air Max Day!


Core77

Sony World Photography Awards 2017 Shortlist


Nature category, open shortlist. “Diamond-dust”. A picture taken in Nagano-ken, Japan, at an altitude of about 1,700 metres. Diamond dust can be seen on only a few occasions during the cold season. (Photo and caption by Masayasu Sakuma/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Daily life category, professional shortlist. “Inhabitants of the empty”. Syuzanna sits in a shelter made from an old car in front of the abandoned building where she lives in Gyumri, Armenia. (Photo and caption by Yulia Grigoryants/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Daily life category, professional shortlist. “A country doctor and her calling”. Family doctor Floarea Ciupitu visits a house in the village of Gângiova in south-west Romania, where she has worked for the past three decades. (Photo and caption by Ioana Moldovan/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Culture category, open shortlist. “Georgian baptism”. An infant is baptised according to the Orthodox rite in a church in Tbilisi, Georgia. (Photo and caption by Beniamino Pisati/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Culture category, open shortlist. “Mourning ceremony”, pictured in Iran. (Photo and caption by Emrah Karakoç/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Wildlife category, open shortlist. “Buffaloes and stars”. This picture, taken at Zimanga game reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, used an in-camera multiple exposure, with the first lit for the buffaloes and the second focused on the stars. (Photo and caption by Andreas Hemb/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, professional shortlist. “Hamza & Shukra”, from the series Racism in India: the African Portraits. (Photo and caption by Mahesh Shantaram/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, open shortlist. “Present and past” shows 85-year-old Carmen Sajeras, born in Cuba from a family of Spanish immigrants. (Photo and caption by Anisleidy Martínez Fonseca/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, professional shortlist. “Raul Rodrigues Jr” in Apple Valley, California, US. Photographers Edoardo Delille and Giulia Piermartiri went on the road to meet Latinos pledging their vote to Donald Trump. (Photo and caption by Giulia Piermartiri & Edoardo Delille/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Current affairs and news category, professional shortlist. “Caught in the crossfire”. Iraqi men from the Hawija region wait to be questioned by Kurdish security personnel at a base near Kirkuk, Iraq. (Photo and caption by Ivor Prickett/2017 Sony World Photography Awards/Panos Pictures)


Current affairs and news category, professional shortlist. “We are taking no prisoners”. Libyan forces affiliated to the Tripoli government walk around a huge chandelier at the Ouagadougou congress complex in Sirte, Libya. (Photo and caption by Alessio Romenzi/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Sport category, professional shortlist. “Pumping iron in Russia”. Participants wait backstage during a regional bodybuilding championship in Stavropol, southern Russia. (Photo and caption by Eduard Korniyenko/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Travel category, open shortlist. “Lady in red”, shot with a drone on the eastern part of the Luštica peninsula in Montenegro. (Photo and caption by Placido Faranda/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Street photography category, open shortlist. “Metropolis”. A reflection in a window interrupts a street scene. (Photo and caption by Tavepong Pratoomwong/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Still life category, open shortlist. “Palm trees routine” was shot during a visit to the Muralla Roja residential complex in Alicante, Spain. (Photo and caption by Andrés Gallardo Albajar/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Sony World Photography Awards 2017 Shortlist


Nature category, open shortlist. “Diamond-dust”. A picture taken in Nagano-ken, Japan, at an altitude of about 1,700 metres. Diamond dust can be seen on only a few occasions during the cold season. (Photo and caption by Masayasu Sakuma/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Daily life category, professional shortlist. “Inhabitants of the empty”. Syuzanna sits in a shelter made from an old car in front of the abandoned building where she lives in Gyumri, Armenia. (Photo and caption by Yulia Grigoryants/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Daily life category, professional shortlist. “A country doctor and her calling”. Family doctor Floarea Ciupitu visits a house in the village of Gângiova in south-west Romania, where she has worked for the past three decades. (Photo and caption by Ioana Moldovan/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Culture category, open shortlist. “Georgian baptism”. An infant is baptised according to the Orthodox rite in a church in Tbilisi, Georgia. (Photo and caption by Beniamino Pisati/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Culture category, open shortlist. “Mourning ceremony”, pictured in Iran. (Photo and caption by Emrah Karakoç/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Wildlife category, open shortlist. “Buffaloes and stars”. This picture, taken at Zimanga game reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, used an in-camera multiple exposure, with the first lit for the buffaloes and the second focused on the stars. (Photo and caption by Andreas Hemb/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, professional shortlist. “Hamza & Shukra”, from the series Racism in India: the African Portraits. (Photo and caption by Mahesh Shantaram/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, open shortlist. “Present and past” shows 85-year-old Carmen Sajeras, born in Cuba from a family of Spanish immigrants. (Photo and caption by Anisleidy Martínez Fonseca/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Portraiture category, professional shortlist. “Raul Rodrigues Jr” in Apple Valley, California, US. Photographers Edoardo Delille and Giulia Piermartiri went on the road to meet Latinos pledging their vote to Donald Trump. (Photo and caption by Giulia Piermartiri & Edoardo Delille/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Current affairs and news category, professional shortlist. “Caught in the crossfire”. Iraqi men from the Hawija region wait to be questioned by Kurdish security personnel at a base near Kirkuk, Iraq. (Photo and caption by Ivor Prickett/2017 Sony World Photography Awards/Panos Pictures)


Current affairs and news category, professional shortlist. “We are taking no prisoners”. Libyan forces affiliated to the Tripoli government walk around a huge chandelier at the Ouagadougou congress complex in Sirte, Libya. (Photo and caption by Alessio Romenzi/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Sport category, professional shortlist. “Pumping iron in Russia”. Participants wait backstage during a regional bodybuilding championship in Stavropol, southern Russia. (Photo and caption by Eduard Korniyenko/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Travel category, open shortlist. “Lady in red”, shot with a drone on the eastern part of the Luštica peninsula in Montenegro. (Photo and caption by Placido Faranda/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Street photography category, open shortlist. “Metropolis”. A reflection in a window interrupts a street scene. (Photo and caption by Tavepong Pratoomwong/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Still life category, open shortlist. “Palm trees routine” was shot during a visit to the Muralla Roja residential complex in Alicante, Spain. (Photo and caption by Andrés Gallardo Albajar/2017 Sony World Photography Awards)


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Why 2017 will be the year of the industry cloud

hand touching visual screen 2016 was another year of impressive growth in the Enterprise cloud software space: Last year there were 31 cloud software companies that were publicly held and commanded a market capitalization north of $ 1 billion. 2016 also was notable because cloud companies with businesses aimed at vertical industries became juicy buyout targets for large horizontal software companies. Read More


TechCrunch

Stockholm Design Week 2017

The largest annual tradeshow for Scandinavian design takes place—fittingly, perhaps—in the middle of the long Nordic winter, when the temperature is typically hovering around freezing. Even so, the quality and quantity of the products and projects brings some 50,000 visitors to the Stockholmsmässan over the course of a week. Taking place from February 6–12, the city’s eponymous design week coincides with the Furniture & Light Fair, which ran from the 7–11th this year, featuring a tasteful selection of new and recent work by independent designers and studios alongside more commercial offerings.

We undertook a whirlwind tour of the fair, which was divided into three main sections with the usual tradeshow fare, as well as a number of special guest exhibitions throughout the Stockholmsmässan. While it was nice to see blockbuster booths from well-known Scandinavian brands such as HAY, Muuto, Normann Copenhagen, Menu, Kvadrat, etc., it was the independent brands and student presentations that offered the latest and greatest projects. 

Here are just a few highlights from the Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair 2017.

Originating from the Hancock Shaker Village in Massachusetts, “Furnishing Utopia” is an ongoing collaboration between over a dozen designers, who have revisited traditional typologies developed by “the first minimalists” from the late 1700s. The Shaker Design Project debuted at NYCxDesign last year and the latest edition includes new pieces alongside the first collection; participants include Core favs Ladies & Gentlemen Studio, Chris Specce, Studio Gorm, Gabriel Tan, Zoë Mowat, Jonah Takagi, and many more.
In the foreground: “Trestle Table” by Studio Gorm; “Brush Study” by Zoë Mowat; “Stepstool” by Anderssen & Voll
“Hancock Basket” by Studio Tolvanen; Broom and Sconce by Tom Bonamici
“Handy” folding ladder and rake by Chris Specce; “Secretary Desk” and “Woven Stools” by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio

Smaller objects such as “The Hand” by Studio Tolvanen, baskets by Studio Gorm, “Brethern Doorstops” by Gabriel Tan, and measuring tools by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio
The Danish Design Maker exhibition included 20 projects and prototypes, such as the “Sui” chair by Studio FEM
“Plusboxes” by Wednesday Architecture 

Muuto was among the many Scandinavian brands at the fair.
Curated by second-year “Design + Change” students, Linnaeus University‘s exhibition showcased speculative projects by third-year “Design and Sustainability students.
UOK” by Sofie Röjne hypothesizes products to suppress the five senses.
Xenotransplantation” by Ebba Johansson addresses organ transplanting between humans and animals, and vice versa
Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture presented “Under Bar Himmel,” a collection of bent-steel chairs.

Konstfack grad Keisuke Kawase
TORU hails from Barcelona
Studio Foy is based in Oslo

Jaime Hayon was this year’s Guest of Honor
The Spanish designer created a pavilion in the atrium of the Stockholmsmässan 
Hayon was the 14th Guest of Honor for the Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair.


Core77