Chinese Power Company Rigs Up Drones That Can Spray Fire

“Drones” is a broad term, encompassing both the friendly multirotor type that carry GoPros over snowboarders, and the more menacing UAV type that fires rockets into convoys. The safe kind requires little more than a credit card to acquire, whereas the dangerous kind needs an encrypted satellite uplink and a team of burnt-out pilots manning workstations in Nevada.

Those differing barriers of entry are why I don’t like the idea of weaponizing the former. Yet it’s happening, though the people doing it may not realize they’re doing it. First graffiti artist Katsu rigged up a drone that could spraypaint. If multirotor drones can spray paint, then they can spray other compressed gasses, which I imagine has to give a terrorist ideas. And now a power company in China has rigged up a drone that can spray fire.

What’s happening is that airborne garbage is getting caught on overhead high voltage lines. The company reckons that the most efficient way to get it off is to burn it off–I guess this is what happens when you don’t have an OSHA or an EPA–and a multirotor is easier to send up than a worker in a hydraulic bucket.

All I can think about is how much damage something like this could do in, say, Manhattan. A firefighter’s bane is a blaze he cannot easily get to, and what we see here seems like the ideal way to start hard-to-reach fires.

Via Gizmodo


Core77

Beautiful Photos Of Cuba In 1954 That Looks Like A Country Of Freedom

Legendary German photographer Heinrich Heidersberger worked on a cruise ship, the MS Atlantic, in 1954. He took thousands of pictures of Americans sailing from New York to Havana — something Americans haven’t been allowed to do for almost 50 years.

More info: Heinrich Heidersberger, Spiegel (h/t: messynessychic)

An Italian friend convinced Heidersberger to join the cruise on the MS Atlantic in part so Heidersberger could teach him the relatively new art of color photography. The photos disappeared for decades but resurfaced in 2001. Heidersberger himself was impressed by how well the slides were preserved, and a series of prints are now on display in an exhibition called “MS Atlantic, New York – Cuba,” at Hamburg’s Kunstgut Gallery, through April 22.

For Europeans, it’s easy to forget that traveling to Cuba is taboo for Americans. But that hasn’t always been the case. Before Fidel Castro’s revolution in 1959, the Caribbean island was treated as a playground for America’s wealthy, rather like Europeans now treat Mallorca or the south of Portugal. But since the trade and travel embargos set by President Kennedy at the height of the Cold War, in the early ’60s, Cuba has been an illegal destination for Americans.



















Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Chinese Power Company Rigs Up Drones That Can Spray Fire

“Drones” is a broad term, encompassing both the friendly multirotor type that carry GoPros over snowboarders, and the more menacing UAV type that fires rockets into convoys. The safe kind requires little more than a credit card to acquire, whereas the dangerous kind needs an encrypted satellite uplink and a team of burnt-out pilots manning workstations in Nevada.

Those differing barriers of entry are why I don’t like the idea of weaponizing the former. Yet it’s happening, though the people doing it may not realize they’re doing it. First graffiti artist Katsu rigged up a drone that could spraypaint. If multirotor drones can spray paint, then they can spray other compressed gasses, which I imagine has to give a terrorist ideas. And now a power company in China has rigged up a drone that can spray fire.

What’s happening is that airborne garbage is getting caught on overhead high voltage lines. The company reckons that the most efficient way to get it off is to burn it off–I guess this is what happens when you don’t have an OSHA or an EPA–and a multirotor is easier to send up than a worker in a hydraulic bucket.

All I can think about is how much damage something like this could do in, say, Manhattan. A firefighter’s bane is a blaze he cannot easily get to, and what we see here seems like the ideal way to start hard-to-reach fires.

Via Gizmodo


Core77

Davis Furniture Industries’ Sexy Wall Hooks

Last week we looked at unusual hanger designs, this week I’m looking at hooks. Specifically the ones from North-Carolina-based Davis Furniture Industries, which licenses European designs. Like these polished chrome Bits created by Walter Zwick:

And this Lux double hook by Christian Hoisl:

The Plane by Gino Carollo incorporates Ash wood, and pleasingly leaves the grain visible beneath the paint:

My favorite of theirs isn’t a standalone hook, but more of a system. This is their Line line, which features a pull-down bar and three fixed knobs. (I’m guessing this one was designed in-house as no designer is credited.)

Check out more of Davis’ stuff here.


Core77

People still live in Henry Ford’s failed jungle utopia

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Who needs experts?

Continue reading People still live in Henry Ford’s failed jungle utopia

People still live in Henry Ford’s failed jungle utopia originally appeared on Autoblog on Tue, 21 Feb 2017 11:36:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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The Story of Mar-a-Lago, the “Winter White House”

Marjorie Merriweather Post was once the wealthiest woman in the United States. The daughter of breakfast cereal magnate C.W. Post, she inherited the Postum Cereals Company after his death in 1914, when she was just 27; she subsequently attained a net worth of $ 250 million, about $ 5 billion in today’s dollars.

In 1924 she built a lavish estate called Mar-a-Lago on Palm Beach Island, Florida. The massive structure held 128 rooms spread over 110,000 square feet. It had 58 bedrooms, 33 bathrooms and the dining room was serviced by some 35 footmen.

In her will, Post donated the estate to the American government, hoping it would serve as a winter retreat for U.S. Presidents; but following her death in 1973, no President ever used it, preferring other properties. Thus the government, finding it too expensive to maintain, donated it back to the Post Foundation in 1981.

Post’s three daughters allowed Mar-a-Lago to fall into disrepair and put it on the market. In 1985, Donald Trump made an offer to buy it for $ 28 million. The Post daughters said no, holding out for more money. Trump then told them that he had purchased the plot of land in front of it–which wasn’t true at the time–and promised to build an enormously ugly house that would block Mar-a-Lago’s view and ruin its value.

The Post daughters gave in, and Trump bought the property for just $ 5 million. He paid another $ 3 million for the antiques and furnishings within.

Fascinatingly, Trump subsequently transformed Mar-a-Lago into a members-only social club that broke a dirty, unspoken rule of white-dominated Palm Beach society: Mar-a-Lago readily accepted Jews and blacks. Trump heavily courted celebrities, and anyone who could pony up the $ 50,000 initiation fee (or was comped) could join. Trump supporters will say he did this out of a desire for equality; Trump opposers will say he did this because it was fabulously profitable. Whichever side you’re on, I highly recommend you read the full story on it in both Vanity Fair and The Washington Post. Truth is stranger than fiction.

Today Mar-a-Lago is still a social club, with a portion of the house carved out as a private Trump family residence. He’s renovated the estate and added a 20,000-square-foot ballroom. The membership initiation fee had increased to $ 100,000 in 2012 and remained steady until Trump won the election; now it’s $ 200,000, plus $ 14,000 in annual dues.

Ms. Post had hoped Mar-a-Lago would become a Presidential retreat. Now it is, and it’s even got a new nickname: “The Winter White House.”


Core77

The Story of Mar-a-Lago, the “Winter White House”

Marjorie Merriweather Post was once the wealthiest woman in the United States. The daughter of breakfast cereal magnate C.W. Post, she inherited the Postum Cereals Company after his death in 1914, when she was just 27; she subsequently attained a net worth of $ 250 million, about $ 5 billion in today’s dollars.

In 1924 she built a lavish estate called Mar-a-Lago on Palm Beach Island, Florida. The massive structure held 128 rooms spread over 110,000 square feet. It had 58 bedrooms, 33 bathrooms and the dining room was serviced by some 35 footmen.

In her will, Post donated the estate to the American government, hoping it would serve as a winter retreat for U.S. Presidents; but following her death in 1973, no President ever used it, preferring other properties. Thus the government, finding it too expensive to maintain, donated it back to the Post Foundation in 1981.

Post’s three daughters allowed Mar-a-Lago to fall into disrepair and put it on the market. In 1985, Donald Trump made an offer to buy it for $ 28 million. The Post daughters said no, holding out for more money. Trump then told them that he had purchased the plot of land in front of it–which wasn’t true at the time–and promised to build an enormously ugly house that would block Mar-a-Lago’s view and ruin its value.

The Post daughters gave in, and Trump bought the property for just $ 5 million. He paid another $ 3 million for the antiques and furnishings within.

Fascinatingly, Trump subsequently transformed Mar-a-Lago into a members-only social club that broke a dirty, unspoken rule of white-dominated Palm Beach society: Mar-a-Lago readily accepted Jews and blacks. Trump heavily courted celebrities, and anyone who could pony up the $ 50,000 initiation fee (or was comped) could join. Trump supporters will say he did this out of a desire for equality; Trump opposers will say he did this because it was fabulously profitable. Whichever side you’re on, I highly recommend you read the full story on it in both Vanity Fair and The Washington Post. Truth is stranger than fiction.

Today Mar-a-Lago is still a social club, with a portion of the house carved out as a private Trump family residence. He’s renovated the estate and added a 20,000-square-foot ballroom. The membership initiation fee had increased to $ 100,000 in 2012 and remained steady until Trump won the election; now it’s $ 200,000, plus $ 14,000 in annual dues.

Ms. Post had hoped Mar-a-Lago would become a Presidential retreat. Now it is, and it’s even got a new nickname: “The Winter White House.”


Core77

Meet The Tree That Actually Bleeds When It’s Sliced Open

The bloodwood tree (Pterocarpus angolensis) is a deciduous tree with a high canopy, reaching about 15m in height and has dark bark. The red sap is used traditionally as a dye and in some areas mixed with animal fat to make a cosmetic for faces and bodies. It is also believed to have magical properties for the curing of problems concerning blood, apparently because of its close resemblance to blood. The name bloodwood for these trees stems from the dark red to brown sap that accumulates on wounds on the trunks.








Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

The BMW Z5 looks great with its top down, even in the middle of winter

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Top-down winter driving is wonderful.

Continue reading The BMW Z5 looks great with its top down, even in the middle of winter

The BMW Z5 looks great with its top down, even in the middle of winter originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 20 Feb 2017 16:44:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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