The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 2: Final Rendering

Here in Part 2 industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, has just one more step to complete before building a model of his solar charger design: Nailing that all-important final rendering.

Some of you will do this all on paper, some digitally. Strebel has developed his own workflow combining the two for greater efficiency. Here he provides some practical rendering tips including why he starts with orange and 20% grey, why black comes last, how to get gradations on paper without pastel dust getting everywhere, what’s faster to do on paper vs. faster to do digitally, and more. Check it out:

Missed Part 1? Check it out here.


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Millions Of Crabs Invade Cuba’s Bay Of Pigs


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters

Crabs coming from the surrounding forests cross a highway on their way to spawn in the sea in Playa Giron, Cuba on April 25, 2017. Each year, after the first spring rains, millions of red, yellow and black landcrabs march for days from the surrounding forests to the bay on Cuba’s southern coast to spawn in the sea.


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Lounging Meets Transportation With Hammocraft | Autoblog Minute

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Wyoming based company Hammocraft has made a frame that allows you to attach a hammock to some of your favorite water crafts. Designed to be used with paddle boards and kayaks this metal frame was inspired by the desire to lounge on the go. The Hammocraft frame is currently a Kickstarter project.

Continue reading Lounging Meets Transportation With Hammocraft | Autoblog Minute

Lounging Meets Transportation With Hammocraft | Autoblog Minute originally appeared on Autoblog on Wed, 26 Apr 2017 02:32:49 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 2: Final Rendering

Here in Part 2 industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, has just one more step to complete before building a model of his solar charger design: Nailing that all-important final rendering.

Some of you will do this all on paper, some digitally. Strebel has developed his own workflow combining the two for greater efficiency. Here he provides some practical rendering tips including why he starts with orange and 20% grey, why black comes last, how to get gradations on paper without pastel dust getting everywhere, what’s faster to do on paper vs. faster to do digitally, and more. Check it out:

Missed Part 1? Check it out here.


Core77

The Industrial Design Prototyping Process, Part 2: Final Rendering

Here in Part 2 industrial designer Eric Strebel, founder of Botzen Design, has just one more step to complete before building a model of his solar charger design: Nailing that all-important final rendering.

Some of you will do this all on paper, some digitally. Strebel has developed his own workflow combining the two for greater efficiency. Here he provides some practical rendering tips including why he starts with orange and 20% grey, why black comes last, how to get gradations on paper without pastel dust getting everywhere, what’s faster to do on paper vs. faster to do digitally, and more. Check it out:

Missed Part 1? Check it out here.


Core77

Deborah Simon’s ‘Flayed’ Bears Reflect On Human, Animal Relationships

Deborah Simon, a Virginia-born, New York-based artist, creates sculptures that explore “the reality of the animal and the vulnerability imbued in toy.” Though her sculptures appear to be taxidermy, series like “Flayed Animals” are made entirely from hand. She uses materials like polymer clay, faux fur, acrylic paint, wire, foam, glass, and embroidery materials to create these animals, mostly focusing on bears.

More info: Deborah Simon (h/t: hifructose)
















Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

Spotted On Coroflot: The Imbue Travel Teacup 

When the Imbue tea mug first got posted to Coroflot, I was a bit put off by the heavy proportions of the wooden lid and made some snap judgments about the overall value of the design. (Nothing personal, the Whole Foods/greenwashed vibe has its place.) However, while really savoring a spring flu over the weeks since, I’ve found myself wishing for this exact type of travel mug and realized most of the mobile tea options out there are fairly uncool. So it’s only fair to double back and give it some love.

The Imbue Magnetic Tea Vessel was designed by Ashkon Nima, and its strength isn’t in those Look At Me, I Recycle rustic materials, it’s the dead simple integrated strainer. We’ve beaten the ancient horse of tea straining at home a thousand times over, but making tea on the go can still be messy. Where do you put your teabag? How do you keep from over steeping while you’re sprinting for the train? 

In this case, your unwanted tea leaves just stay inside the magnetic strainer, integrated into the cap. It turns out that bulky cap I found a little ostentatious at first makes more sense—visually and literally—when you realize the mug is also meant to work upside down. 

Steep your tea with the mug upside down and the strainer at the bottom, then flip it up when you’re ready to call it done and use the deep-sided cap to catch drips. I love me a low fuss daily tool, and this delivers without getting into twee (or drippy or clanky) tea ball territory. 

This would be particularly nice to use with my schmancy oolongs and other teas that can be re-steeped for different subtle effects (at least once I get my sense of smell back). The reality of over-steeped tea isn’t going to kill anybody, but having a choice is great.


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Design Job: Delicious Design! Astor Chocolate is Seeking a Graphic Designer in Lakewood Township, NJ

Graphic Designer Astor Chocolate is a premier luxury chocolate manufacturer, with its fundamental strength being its innovation, creativity and dedication to creating premium products. We provide our customers with the opportunity to promote them, leaving an everlasting impression of distinction and quality. We work in an

View the full design job here
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NASA’s 3D-Printed Metallic Fabric

Rocket ships have something in common with UPS trucks: There are only so many packages you can fit in there. Hauling stuff into space is expensive, and it would be better if the things you needed to get up there could be folded up for transport, to make room for more stuff.

At the same time, these foldable items need to be made from robust materials. Thus NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been 3D printing metallic, chain-mail-like fabrics.

“We call it ‘4-D printing’ because we can print both the geometry and the function of these materials,” said [NASA Systems Engineer Raul] Polit Casillas. “If 20th Century manufacturing was driven by mass production, then this is the mass production of functions.”

Fabricating spacecraft designs can be complex and costly, said Andrew Shapiro-Scharlotta of JPL, whose office funds research for early-stage technologies like the space fabric. He said that adding multiple functions to a material at different stages of development could make the whole process cheaper. It could also open the door to new designs.

“We are just scratching the surface of what’s possible,” Shapiro-Scharlotta said. “The use of organic and non-linear shapes at no additional costs to fabrication will lead to more efficient mechanical designs.”

The space fabrics have four essential functions: reflectivity, passive heat management, foldability and tensile strength. One side of the fabric reflects light, while the other absorbs it, acting as a means of thermal control. It can fold in many different ways and adapt to shapes while still being able to sustain the force of pulling on it.

The JPL actually has an in-house rapid-prototyping “Atelier” that Polit Casillas is in charge of. If the fabrics prove durable enough in space, the next steps, Polit Casillas says, will be to figure out how to both print them in space and recycle them on the spot, to be able to quickly re-purpose the material.


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