POV of Tesla Driving While Equipped with Autopilot Full Self-Driving Hardware

When Tesla announced that every car they produce is now coming out of the factory with full self-driving hardware, I was a little stunned. I figured the relatively easy highway stuff was one thing, but that navigating towns, cities and crosswalks would be another. Nevertheless, while it’s true that they’ll have to wait for legislators to get their acts together before rolling it out, Tesla has achieved fully self-driving cars that can navigate within complex environments.

In this real-world demonstration video, a guy takes a ride to work (to a Tesla facility, naturally) while his car does all of the driving. It navigates a town environment, tons of traffic and twisty roads while avoiding pedestrians:

While we’re only shown three camera views, Tesla’s system uses eight cameras that provide a 360-degree view. The camera footage is combined with sonar and radar to provide a “neural net” that “provides a view of the world that a driver alone cannot access, seeing in every direction simultaneously and on wavelengths that go far beyond the human senses.”

One temporary setback is that Tesla’s updated system doesn’t yet have the “experience” generated by their last-generation system. This means that, temporarily, new Tesla owners will actually have less capabilities than first-gen owners. As the company explains:

Before activating the features enabled by the new hardware, we will further calibrate the system using millions of miles of real-world driving to ensure significant improvements to safety and convenience. While this is occurring, Teslas with new hardware will temporarily lack certain features currently available on Teslas with first-generation Autopilot hardware, including some standard safety features such as automatic emergency braking, collision warning, lane holding and active cruise control. As these features are robustly validated we will enable them over the air, together with a rapidly expanding set of entirely new features. As always, our over-the-air software updates will keep customers at the forefront of technology and continue to make every Tesla, including those equipped with first-generation Autopilot and earlier cars, more capable over time.


Core77

As “Rogue One” Approaches, Energy Company Calculates Daily Operating Cost of the Death Star

Whenever someone’s referred to as the “architect of destruction” of a particular thing, that person is rarely an actual architect. Except, of course, in the case of the Death Star’s architect; last year we heard him mount an impassioned defense of his design for that ill-advised exhaust port.

Now for some more Death Star infrastructure talk. British power company Ovo Energy took a close look at the battle station’s operations, contacted experts in a variety of fields, and calculated its daily operating costs in British pounds. While they’ve obviously considered energy-hogs like that planet-destroying laser, they’ve also examined the costs of electricity, laundry, garbage disposal and recycling, and food and drink:

It must be noted that Ovo, being a British company, has rather Anglicized the needs of Death Star occupants. For example, in “Feeding the Crew” an allowance has been made for two cups of tea per day, as well as a bizarrely low-protein diet for Stormtroopers: Porridge for breakfast, baked bread (alone!) for lunch, and freaking casserole for dinner. Is it a wonder that New York City and other world capitals don’t have any British restaurants?


Core77

November: The happy-days-are-here-again, maybe, Edition

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Chevy Volt, Ford Focus Hybrid, Nissan Leaf all had strong sales in November.

Continue reading November: The happy-days-are-here-again, maybe, Edition

November: The happy-days-are-here-again, maybe, Edition originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 05 Dec 2016 09:15:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Autoblog

A Wood-Fired DIY Hot Tub, a Retractable Ceiling Bed Mechanism, Moving an Entire Shop, How to Make a Box with a Pop-Up Insert & More

Making a Box with a Pop-Up Insert

Swan conceived of a low-tech mechanism to add a small surprise to these boxes. Here he shows you how he made them and how the mechanism works:

DIY Retractable Ceiling Bed

Using a garage door opener and sliding-door hardware, Ana and Jacob White figured out how to rig up a retractable ceiling bed for their latest tiny house design:

Shop Tour

Linn from Darbin Orvar gives us a tour of her shop—or shops, I should say, as her work is divided (hand tools/power tools) between two freestanding structures outside of her house:

DIY Wood-Fired Hot Tub in Progress

This one’s really just a bit of a teaser, as the finished build video isnt done yet: Ben Uyeda has been working on a design for a wood-fired hot tub. Here he’s testing out the heating mechanism:


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using Biscuits For Shelf Pins

John Heisz has worked out a way to retroactively drill shelf pins, by not drilling at all: He uses a biscuit joiner and a couple of simple jigs.

How To Cut Mat Board

Chris Salomone shows you how to gussy up your walls, by framing your artwork in custom-cut mat boards:

Moving Into The Colorado Shop

If you’ve got a shop, hopefully you’ll never have to move it. The Wood Whisperer famously built a huge “dream shop” outside his home in Arizona, but several years later he’s now had to move to Colorado. Here he shows you the garage that will be his new shop, and some of the $ 6,000 moving process:

Turning an Ice Cream Scoop on a Foot-Powered Lathe

If you’ve got a lathe, that’s a fast way for making last-minute gifts (assuming said gifts require handles). Here Shannon Rogers explains, then demonstrates:


Core77

This Archaeology Soap Has Hidden Dinosaurs Inside

1

Bath time is already fun, but why not make it even more enjoyable with this awesome archaeology soap, available on ThinkGeek?

Before you say it, yes, we know it should technically be called paleontology soap, but what’s done is done. And whatever it’s called doesn’t change the fact that it’s the coolest soap around. Why? Because it’s got dinosaurs inside it!

More info: ThinkGeek (h/t: boredpanda)

2

The soap is made to replicate the layers of the earth, and each layer contains different elements such as bentonite clay and pumice that wear away at different rates, just like in real life!

3

The soap is a 13oz, 3-inch cube, which is pretty huge for a bar of soap, and it apparently smells like dirt with a hint of peppermint (don’t ask). Want one? Then head on over to ThinkGeek.

4


Design You Trust. Design, Culture & Society.

A Wood-Fired DIY Hot Tub, a Retractable Ceiling Bed Mechanism, Moving an Entire Shop, How to Make a Box with a Pop-Up Insert & More

Making a Box with a Pop-Up Insert

Swan conceived of a low-tech mechanism to add a small surprise to these boxes. Here he shows you how he made them and how the mechanism works:

DIY Retractable Ceiling Bed

Using a garage door opener and sliding-door hardware, Ana and Jacob White figured out how to rig up a retractable ceiling bed for their latest tiny house design:

Shop Tour

Linn from Darbin Orvar gives us a tour of her shop—or shops, I should say, as her work is divided (hand tools/power tools) between two freestanding structures outside of her house:

DIY Wood-Fired Hot Tub in Progress

This one’s really just a bit of a teaser, as the finished build video isnt done yet: Ben Uyeda has been working on a design for a wood-fired hot tub. Here he’s testing out the heating mechanism:


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using Biscuits For Shelf Pins

John Heisz has worked out a way to retroactively drill shelf pins, by not drilling at all: He uses a biscuit joiner and a couple of simple jigs.

How To Cut Mat Board

Chris Salomone shows you how to gussy up your walls, by framing your artwork in custom-cut mat boards:

Moving Into The Colorado Shop

If you’ve got a shop, hopefully you’ll never have to move it. The Wood Whisperer famously built a huge “dream shop” outside his home in Arizona, but several years later he’s now had to move to Colorado. Here he shows you the garage that will be his new shop, and some of the $ 6,000 moving process:

Turning an Ice Cream Scoop on a Foot-Powered Lathe

If you’ve got a lathe, that’s a fast way for making last-minute gifts (assuming said gifts require handles). Here Shannon Rogers explains, then demonstrates:


Core77

A Wood-Fired DIY Hot Tub, a Retractable Ceiling Bed Mechanism, Moving an Entire Shop, How to Make a Box with a Pop-Up Insert & More

Making a Box with a Pop-Up Insert

Swan conceived of a low-tech mechanism to add a small surprise to these boxes. Here he shows you how he made them and how the mechanism works:

DIY Retractable Ceiling Bed

Using a garage door opener and sliding-door hardware, Ana and Jacob White figured out how to rig up a retractable ceiling bed for their latest tiny house design:

Shop Tour

Linn from Darbin Orvar gives us a tour of her shop—or shops, I should say, as her work is divided (hand tools/power tools) between two freestanding structures outside of her house:

DIY Wood-Fired Hot Tub in Progress

This one’s really just a bit of a teaser, as the finished build video isnt done yet: Ben Uyeda has been working on a design for a wood-fired hot tub. Here he’s testing out the heating mechanism:


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using Biscuits For Shelf Pins

John Heisz has worked out a way to retroactively drill shelf pins, by not drilling at all: He uses a biscuit joiner and a couple of simple jigs.

How To Cut Mat Board

Chris Salomone shows you how to gussy up your walls, by framing your artwork in custom-cut mat boards:

Moving Into The Colorado Shop

If you’ve got a shop, hopefully you’ll never have to move it. The Wood Whisperer famously built a huge “dream shop” outside his home in Arizona, but several years later he’s now had to move to Colorado. Here he shows you the garage that will be his new shop, and some of the $ 6,000 moving process:

Turning an Ice Cream Scoop on a Foot-Powered Lathe

If you’ve got a lathe, that’s a fast way for making last-minute gifts (assuming said gifts require handles). Here Shannon Rogers explains, then demonstrates:


Core77

2011-2016 Toyota Sienna recalled for sliding doors that won’t stay shut

Filed under: ,,,

There are over 1,200 brand-new unsold Sienna minivans on dealer lots that have to be fixed.

Continue reading 2011-2016 Toyota Sienna recalled for sliding doors that won’t stay shut

2011-2016 Toyota Sienna recalled for sliding doors that won’t stay shut originally appeared on Autoblog on Sun, 04 Dec 2016 12:08:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink |  Email this |  Comments
Autoblog

A Wood-Fired DIY Hot Tub, a Retractable Ceiling Bed Mechanism, Moving an Entire Shop, How to Make a Box with a Pop-Up Insert & More

Making a Box with a Pop-Up Insert

Swan conceived of a low-tech mechanism to add a small surprise to these boxes. Here he shows you how he made them and how the mechanism works:

DIY Retractable Ceiling Bed

Using a garage door opener and sliding-door hardware, Ana and Jacob White figured out how to rig up a retractable ceiling bed for their latest tiny house design:

Shop Tour

Linn from Darbin Orvar gives us a tour of her shop—or shops, I should say, as her work is divided (hand tools/power tools) between two freestanding structures outside of her house:

DIY Wood-Fired Hot Tub in Progress

This one’s really just a bit of a teaser, as the finished build video isnt done yet: Ben Uyeda has been working on a design for a wood-fired hot tub. Here he’s testing out the heating mechanism:


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Using Biscuits For Shelf Pins

John Heisz has worked out a way to retroactively drill shelf pins, by not drilling at all: He uses a biscuit joiner and a couple of simple jigs.

How To Cut Mat Board

Chris Salomone shows you how to gussy up your walls, by framing your artwork in custom-cut mat boards:

Moving Into The Colorado Shop

If you’ve got a shop, hopefully you’ll never have to move it. The Wood Whisperer famously built a huge “dream shop” outside his home in Arizona, but several years later he’s now had to move to Colorado. Here he shows you the garage that will be his new shop, and some of the $ 6,000 moving process:

Turning an Ice Cream Scoop on a Foot-Powered Lathe

If you’ve got a lathe, that’s a fast way for making last-minute gifts (assuming said gifts require handles). Here Shannon Rogers explains, then demonstrates:


Core77